Schenectady still has a bright future

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion I have enjoyed following Schenectady’s revitalization over the last 15 years, thanks to the efforts of countless stakeholders. However, after losing multiple landmarks, I believe we’re missing opportunities to make lasting change while reversing the antiquated message that growth requires a choice between past and future. I’m confident that we have everything we need to implement sustainable building practices, create connected and vibrant neighborhoods citywide, and move toward reducing our reliance on government and outside funding to thrive.I was raised here by hard-working parents who understood the opportunities the city afforded. I’m a proud product of the public school system and community-supported initiatives. My first job was as a newspaper carrier for The Gazette. High grades earned me numerous scholarships, including from local public-benefit organizations. Schenectady got a bad rap back then, and my parents were often heard proudly defending the city, its unique heritage and its untapped potential. These days, I find myself doing that, too, wondering why people fail to realize that urban centers will always share good and bad, and we are no exception.Our local constituents offer invaluable insight into green design alternatives like salvaging demolition materials. Many well-meaning organizations are struggling to remain viable while advocating healthy communities. With a little ingenuity, we can harness the collective power of these groups and make Schenectady a leader in smart growth, sustainable construction and interdependent community. In my graduation speech 21 years ago, I spoke about a bright future and I still believe those words.Caroline (Benedict) BardwellSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationMotorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashSchenectady man dies following Cutler Street dirt bike crashSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%last_img read more

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Mayor throws down planning gauntlet in London

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The end of final salary pensions could sound the death knell for retirement

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Top Birmingham agents plan new niche firm

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Crossing continents

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Unfinished business

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IMF chief sees ‘mild’ virus impact on global economy

first_imgIt is too early to tell the economic toll from the virus outbreak in China, but the hit to global growth should be “mild,” International Monetary Fund chief Kristalina Georgieva said Wednesday.The death toll from the new coronavirus epidemic in China has climbed past 1,350, but hopes have risen that the outbreak could peak later this month.The IMF is expecting a “V-shaped impact,” with a sharp decline in activity in China followed by a sharp recovery, meaning there likely will only be a “mild impact on the rest of the world,” Georgieva said on CNBC. But she cautioned: “It is still too early to make projections,” and the global economy is “somewhat less strong” than it was when China faced the SARS virus epidemic in 2003.”China was different, the world was different. This virus is clearly more impactful and the world economy then was very strong,” she said.The IMF projects China’s economy will grow 6.0 percent this year, compared to 10 percent in 2003.US officials likewise are reluctant to provide forecasts but say the impact on the American economy probably will be short-lived.”There’s no question it’s having a significant impact in China,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told legislators Wednesday. But for the US economy “I don’t expect that the coronavirus will have an impact beyond this year.”He echoed the comments from Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, saying, “we’re obviously monitoring very carefully.” Topics :last_img read more

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Australia says anyone entering the country must self-isolate

first_imgAustralia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison said all people arriving from overseas will have to self isolate for 14 days, as his government stepped up efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus.The order will come into force at midnight, Morrison said in a televised address Sunday. Australia will also ban cruise ships from foreign ports from docking in Australia for 30 days and will prohibit mass gatherings of 500 people or more, though schools will remain open.“We are going to have to get used to some changes in how we live our lives over the next six months or so,” Morrison told reporters after a meeting of the national Cabinet. “We know that the virus cannot be absolutely stopped,” he said. “But we can slow the spread” to protect the most vulnerable in society. The measures announced Sunday are another escalation of the response by the government, which has announced a A$17.6 billion ($10.9 billion) stimulus package to buttress the economy.Following advice from health professionals, Morrison also said “static, non-essential” gatherings should not go ahead if more than 500 people attend. These include places such as stadiums and theaters where people are in close proximity with each other for a sustained period of time, he said. On Friday, he stopped short of an outright ban on mass gatherings as it opted instead to “advise” against them.Nations around the world are trying to shield citizens from the deadly virus. France has shut cafes and restaurants, while Spain declared an emergency as cases rose to more than 145,000 worldwide and the death toll increased to more than 5,700.New Zealand on Saturday announced similar measures to Australia’s, requiring almost every individual who enters the country, including citizens and residents, to self-isolate for 14 days.In Australia, 249 people have been infected, from 197 on Saturday, health authorities said. Morrison said his Cabinet would now meet via teleconference as part of social distancing measures. Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton is in isolation after testing positive.Topics :last_img read more

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Tokyo Olympics president says new Games date could come this week

first_imgMori added that he expected a call this week from Thomas Bach, president of the International Olympics Committee (IOC), to decide new dates, following two suggestions made by the organizing panel last week.”I would imagine Bach is going to call me this week on this,” said Mori, a former Japanese prime minister.”I think the members also have their opinion. We’ve got plenty of time to exchange opinions and after that I’d expect everyone to unite and move ahead for the success of the Games in one voice.”The organizing committee held several calls with the IOC over the last week to discuss benefits and drawbacks of Games held next year, either in spring or summer, he added.On Sunday, citing unidentified sources, public broadcaster NHK said the opening ceremony of the delayed Games was most likely to be on July 23 next year, and the closing ceremony on Aug. 8, each a calendar day earlier than the 2020 schedule.The postponement is the first in the 124-year history of the modern Olympics, although several, including the 1940 Tokyo Games, were cancelled due to war. A decision on a new date for Japan’s Olympics, postponed because of a coronavirus pandemic, could come as early as this week, the president of the Tokyo organizing committee, Yoshiro Mori, said on Monday.Last week’s postponement is a huge blow to Japan, which invested US$13 billion in the run-up to the Games, although financial markets were initially cheered by the decision, with some investors having anticipated cancellation.”We need to swiftly decide on the new date,” Mori said at the start of a committee meeting, its first since the historic decision to delay the Games. Topics :last_img read more

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US death toll spirals amid rush to build field hospitals, find supplies

first_imgNearly 3,900 people have already died from COVID-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus, in the United States, more than the 2,977 who died in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The total confirmed US cases rose to 187,000.White House medical experts say 100,000 to 240,000 people could ultimately perish from the respiratory disease in the United States, despite unprecedented orders by state and local governments largely confining Americans to their homes.In addition to the rules issued by at least 30 states, President Donald Trump, reversing course, said this week that most businesses and schools should remain shut at least through the end of April. Trump, speaking at the White House on Tuesday, said the next two weeks would be “very, very painful” for the country.”We want Americans to be prepared for the hard days that lie ahead. We’re going to through a very tough two weeks and then, hopefully, as the experts are predicting … you’re going to be seeing some real light at the end of the tunnel,” the president said.The US Army Corps of Engineers sought hotels, dormitories, convention centers and large open spaces to build as many as 341 temporary hospitals, Lieutenant General Todd Semonite told the ABC News “Good Morning America” program. The corps has already converted New York City’s Jacob Javits Convention Center into a 1,000-bed hospital.In Los Angeles, the city’s massive convention center was being converted to a federal medical station by the National Guard, Mayor Gil Garcetti said on Twitter. In California, the most populous US state, the number of coronavirus patients has surged over the past few days, with more than 7,600 cases confirmed as of Tuesday and 150 deaths.Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont said on Tuesday the US Strategic National Stockpile of medical supplies was now empty and the state was “on its own” trying to obtain medical equipment to fight the pandemic.A Dutch cruise ship with confirmed cases of the virus and four fatalities on board sought permission to dock in Florida, even as Governor Ron DeSantis said the state could not afford to take on any additional patients.The pandemic has taken a toll on doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers, who are overworked and lack the medical devices and protective gear needed.”The duration itself is debilitating and exhausting and depressing,” New York Governor Andrew Cuomo told a news conference.The governor said his brother, 49-year-old CNN anchor Chris Cuomo, had tested positive for the coronavirus on Tuesday and would host his nightly show from his basement to avoid infecting family members or others.US coronavirus-related deaths still trail those of Italy and Spain, which have more than 11,000 and 8,000 reported fatalities, respectively. China, where the outbreak is believed to have originated, has reported 3,305.Worldwide, there are now more than 800,000 cases of the highly contagious illness caused by the virus and more than 40,000 deaths reported. An intensive-care-unit nurse at a major hospital in Manhattan said he had been shocked by the deteriorating condition of young patients with little or no underlying health issues.”A 28-year-old, healthy fellow ICU nurse is currently so sick that he has difficulty walking up a single flight of stairs without gasping for breath,” said the nurse, requesting anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media. Topics : The US government raced on Tuesday to build hundreds of makeshift hospitals near major cities as healthcare systems were pushed to capacity, and sometimes beyond, by the coronavirus pandemic.Even as millions of Americans hunkered down in their homes under strict “stay-at-home” orders, the death toll, as tallied by Reuters, shot up by more than 850 on Tuesday, by far the most for a single day.Nearly half of the new fatalities were in New York state, the epicenter of the pandemic despite closed businesses and deserted streets. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio pleaded for immediate reinforcements in the country’s biggest city from the Trump administration.center_img “This is the point at which we must be prepared for next week, when we expect a huge increase in the number of cases. What I asked very clearly, last week, was for military medical personnel to be deployed here,” de Blasio said at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Queens, where a field hospital was being hastily built.The sports complex is home to the US Open Tennis Championship, set to begin on Aug. 24. It remains on the calendar despite reports that Wimbledon, the sport’s most prestigious event, is unlikely to go forward as scheduled in June. The US Open and Wimbledon are two of the four Grand Slam tennis tournaments.De Blasio, a Democrat who last year sought his party’s presidential nomination, said he had asked the White House for an additional 1,000 nurses, 300 respiratory therapists and 150 doctors by Sunday.‘Debilitating and exhausting’last_img read more

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