Director of Enterprise Application Services

first_imgThe Director of Enterprise Application Services (EAS) oversees andmanages support for Banner and other applications used throughoutthe university. These support services include installation,configuration, hosting, troubleshooting, technical testing,updates, and integration. The Director of EAS provides technicalleadership, planning, and guidance for the implementation orupgrade of applications, and the design and development of newapplications or interfaces. The Director focuses on oversight andservice to university clients to include second- and third-levelsupport for staff members who are the principal subject-matterexperts for enterprise applications. The Director of EAS reports tothe Associate Vice Chancellor of Information Technology and DeputyChief Information Officer (Deputy CIO). The Director works with theleadership of Information Technology Services (ITS) and directorsof campus departments to provide the enterprise applications andtechnology support required to fulfill the university’s mission,and provide applications support for other departments within thedivision.last_img read more

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A TOUGH ILLNESS THAT REQUIRES TOUGH MEDICINE By Jim Redwine

first_img GAVEL GAMUT By Jim RedwineWeek of March19, 2018A TOUGH ILLNESS THAT REQUIRES TOUGH MEDICINESome medical conditions, say the flu, can be diagnosed and easily cured. Of course, if the flu is actually pneumonia the patient may not fare so well. Some medical conditions even if correctly identified may not be easily treated, certain cancers for example. And some cancers even if properly addressed may metamorphosize into others that are fatal.In our Body Politic a serious condition we must either deal with or be permanently affected by is our Child In Need of Services problem. And even if we do not ignore it, a potentially fatal mistake, the cures we apply will be unavoidably complicated and expensive. Of course, to ignore a cancer is to court our own demise.In this frenetic world of crisis-a-minute news and infuriatingly complex day-to-day existence, we just do not have the time or energy or money to be aware of and address all the problems that may seriously affect us. So we can be forgiven if we would prefer to ignore the extremely complex problems of child and family welfare, especially other people’s children and families.But just as a spot on the skin may be the harbinger of disaster if ignored, if we do not attempt to help an abused or neglected child now, that child or that family may cause all of us harm later. And that harm may be a great deal more difficult and expensive than it would cost to prevent it now.The complexity of our child welfare problem is highlighted by the Indiana Legislature’s scattergun reaction to the criticism of the former State Director of the Department of Family and Child Services who resigned in despair. Just in this year’s session of the General Assembly, fourteen bills concerning DCS matters were introduced. This is a positive sign but just as “all politics is local” we in Posey County, Indiana, just as each of Indiana’s other 91 counties, must take some responsibility for our own situation.In each county, the general needs may be similar but specific needs may call for different approaches. Any solution should include numerous institutions such as the Department of Child Services, the schools, all police agencies, the County Council and Board of Commissioners, the Prosecutor’s office, the medical and mental health agencies and the courts. Of course, the most important constituency in this integrated approach must be the public along with the news media.As I indicated last week I have plenty to do just in the Posey Circuit Court so that’s where I’ll concentrate next week as we work together to craft a comprehensive approach to diagnosing and treating our Child In Need of Services situation in Posey County.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to www.jamesmredwine.comFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Beach Replenishment Update: Project Passes 47th Street

first_imgCheck OCNJ Daily for updates and photos of the progress of work of the Ocean City beach replenishment project for 2015 in the south end of Ocean City between 36th and 59th Streets. Work on the south end beach replenishment project in Ocean City NJ continues into the night as sand gets pumped onto the beach south of 47th Street. DATE: Sunday, May 10PROGRESS: At sundown on Sunday (May 10), work on the south end beach replenishment project was continuing with the pipeline pumping new sand just south of 47th Street. Beaches are closed at 46th Street and 47th Street.WHAT’S NEXT: The project will proceed to 49th Street (anticipated to be complete by mid-May), 55th to 49th (mid-May to mid-June), 55th to 59th (mid-June to mid-July). The southern blocks will require more work to rebuild and repair dunes, so those time frames are longer.READ MORE: Ocean City NJ Beach Replenishment 2015 Daily UpdateFOR DAILY UPDATES by E-MAIL: Sign up for freelast_img read more

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News story: Tax break to help Black cabs go green

first_imgTraditionally, black cabbies have had limited choice in what vehicle they can buy. This has meant that until now, cabbies have been forced to pay charges which their competitors – who can choose more affordable vehicles – can avoid.Not only will today’s exemption save drivers from paying the VED charge but by transferring to a zero emission electric cab they will also benefit from, on average, over £400 a month in fuel savings.This is part of a wider government plan to transform air quality in our towns and cities. It builds on the £7,500 Plug in Taxi Grant, which helps cab drivers buy a zero emission vehicle.And, at Autumn Budget, the government announced a £400 million Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund to support the industry to roll out charge points for electric vehicles across the UK. We are delighted that the Treasury has brought forward previously announced changes to Vehicle Excise Duty for green taxis. These measures will encourage more cabbies to switch to zero emissions transport sooner – meaning improved air quality across the UK. A small number of drivers who already own the vehicle or are expecting to take delivery in March will still have to pay an additional £310 charge. However, LEVC will compensate these drivers to ensure that they are not penalised for being the first to make the transition to a cleaner vehicle. Britain’s black cabs will get a new boost to go green when a tax exemption for electric taxis comes into force this April. The exemption, worth £1,550, will apply to new cabs purchased from April onwards, and follows the Autumn Budget announcement that zero emission taxis worth over £40,000 will no longer have to pay a Vehicle Excise Duty charge.Currently, all cars over £40,000 are required to pay this charge. By exempting zero emission taxis, it is hoped that cabbies will be incentivised to replace their old diesel taxi for a cleaner, greener electric version.If just one switches to a zero emission vehicle, it would rid the country of seven tonnes of carbon dioxide a year. With over 75,000 black cabs operating in England alone, the impact this would have on the environment would be significant.Chancellor of the Exchequer, Philip Hammond said: We’re backing Britain’s black cab drivers to go green. This is a victory for the environment and new technologies, which I am determined to support as we build an economy fit for the future. Ensuring the air in our bustling towns and cities is free from pollution is part of our quest to become the first government to leave the environment in a better state than we found it. CEO of LEVC, Chris Gubbey said:last_img read more

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Kamasi Washington Announces Free Concert To Kick Off NYC’s SummerStage

first_imgRising star Kamasi Washington will play a free concert this summer as a part of Central Park’s SummerStage series. Coming off a year in which the tenor saxophonist released his debut album, The Epic, to rave reviews, Washington will join a long list of celebrated jazz artists to play the NYC series, the first coming in 1986 held at Central Park’s Naumberg Bandshell, featuring the Sun Ra Arkestra.Says Heather Lubov, the executive director of the City Parks Foundation, “For the last couple of years we’ve been identifying a theme, something that’s relevant to New York City.” She adds, “This year, given what seems to be a resurgence of the music particularly with younger jazz artists, it made sense to infuse jazz throughout our festival.”Other performances at this year’s SummerStage will include a June 4th appearance by the McCoy Tyner Quartet and groups led by the bassist Ron Carter and the drummer Roy Haynes as a part of the Blue Note Jazz Festival, as well as Jason Lindner’s Breeding Ground in Marcus Garvey Park on August 26 and the Donny McCaslin Quartet in Tompkins Square Park on August 28 as a part of the Charlie Parker Jazz Festival.SummerStage’s full schedule will be released this April and available here, but in the mean time, you can check out this live performance by Kamasi Washington via Jazz Night In America featuring several cuts from The Epic including “Askim,” “Change of the Guard” and “Henrietta Our Hero.”[Quotes via The New York Times]last_img read more

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Forthcoming John Prine Documentary To Receive Theatrical Release

first_imgA forthcoming documentary about journeyman Americana singer/songwriter John Prine will be screened in movie theaters upon its release at some point in the near future, Rolling Stone reports. The film, which will be titled, John Prine: Hello in There, is currently in post-production but has already been picked up for distribution by Sony Pictures Classics. The film has yet to receive an official release date as of Tuesday’s announcement.Hello in There was directed by Zachary Fuhrer, who also directed the 2012 documentary, Politicians + Prostitutes, and served as an Associate Producer on the 2012 Hollywood feature film, Pain & Gain. Production for the film began in the months leading up to the arrival of Prine’s latest studio album, 2018’s The Tree of Forgiveness. In the months since, it was announced that Prine will be inducted into the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame later this year. John Prine was also nominated for the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame’s class of 2019, but didn’t get the final nod of induction this time around.Related: John Prine’s “Summer’s End” Video Illustrates The Opioid Crisis’ Devastating Effect On FamiliesThe report goes on to state that the film will feature interview footage with a mix of contemporary artists, friends, and peers including Sturgill Simpson, Jason Isbell, and Margo Price. Speaking of Price, the emerging country singer teamed up with Bob Weir this past weekend to pay tribute to Prine during the Americana Pre-Grammy Salute event at the Troubadour in Los Angeles, CA on Saturday night.“Spending time with John Prine over the last year, we’ve learned that he is just as insightful — and hilarious — in everyday life as he is in his songs,” Rolling Stone‘s Patrick Doyle mentioned in a statement about the upcoming film. “From playing at pubs in western Ireland to the Ryman Auditorium, there is nobody better at spellbinding a room.”Prine’s 2019 tour schedule will start up later this month with a run of shows in New Zealand and Australia beginning on February 27th. He’ll return to North America later on this year with highlight performances scheduled at Bonnaroo and Colorado’s Red Rocks Amphitheatre with the Colorado Symphony. Prine will also team up with Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit, Nathaniel Rateliff, Kacey Musgraves, and more for his inaugural All The Best concert destination event in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic come fall on November 11th-15th.Fans can head over to Prine’s website for detailed info on all of his upcoming performances.[H/T Rolling Stone]last_img read more

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Mentors help ease college transition for new Belles

first_imgSaint Mary’s continued to use peer mentors as an integral part of their Belles Beginnings orientation this year, and according to seniors and current peer mentors Katie Frego and Kristie LeBeau, they will continue to play a large role in the first years’ transition throughout the next semester.Through the program, each first year works with an academic advisor based on her intended major, and each advisor picks a current student within the department to act as a peer mentor for the first years, Frego said.“It’s a great way for incoming freshman to meet others within their major and form strong connections,” she said. “These are the girls [they] will be going through classes with for the next four years.”Peer mentors have played a large role in the Belles Beginnings program for several years, and LeBeau said she appreciated the effort her own peer mentor put into making her transition an easy one. LeBeau first felt nervous when she arrived at the College, she said, but her peer mentor helped ease her nerves.“My peer mentor was really helpful in reassuring me that all of those feelings wouldn’t last long,” LeBeau said. “Seeing how much she loved Saint Mary’s made me hold onto the fact that I would get there one day, too. Now, I want to be that source of reassurance to this new class of Belles.”The peer mentors began their job by moving in early for training, Frego said, during which an alumna of the College hosted a workshop with the students.“She taught us how to facilitate small groups and gave us ice-breaker ideas,” Frego said. “She helped us discover our own passions and how to apply those to our groups. She showed us how to get the girls fired up and excited for the next four years.”According to Frego and LeBeau, peer mentors were very involved with their first-year groups from the start of orientation. They introduced them to campus resources such as the Belles Against Violence Office and assisted them with their class schedules.For LeBeau, acting as a peer mentor has been very rewarding.“I really love getting to know this new class of Belles and doing whatever I can to help them fall in love with Saint Mary’s like I did three years ago,” she said.Frego echoed LeBeau and said she is eager to share her passion about Saint Mary’s with the first years.“I’m so passionate about Saint Mary’s,” she said. “I love it, and I want them to feel the same way I do.”The peer mentors’ roles continues past orientation, Frego said, as they assist with the First-Year Common Course, which all first years are required to take. The class is taught by the academic advisors, and the peer mentors also attend and teach two sessions of the class themselves.“The classes are really focused on diving deeper into the history of Saint Mary’s and the history of Holy Cross,” Frego said.There are 10 sessions of the course, and the first years are also required to attend speeches by President Cervelli and Margaret Atwood, an author visiting campus, Frego said. She said the peer mentors are also helping to plan a visit with the first years to Bertrand, Michigan, where the Sisters of the Holy Cross originally lived.Both Frego and LeBeau believe this class of first years shows great potential for success. Frego said her group of first years are both excited and attentive to their studies, and LeBeau said she believes her first years are ready to handle the stresses of college.“This group of girls seems to have the confidence to take on the world,” LeBeau said. “I look at some of the girls from this class and think, ‘Wow, you are ready for this.’ I don’t remember being that confident as a first year. I think that they are all very prepared — whether they know it or not — and will make a strong class of Belles.”Tags: First Year Common Course, first years, peer mentorslast_img read more

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Bullets Over Broadway Star Zach Braff Has a Sundance Hit With Wish I Was Here

first_img Bullets Over Broadway Related Shows Braff previously wrote and directed the 2004 feature film Garden State, which won the Independent Spirit Award for Best First Feature and a Grammy Award for its kick-ass soundtrack. He also wrote the play All New People, which premiered off-Broadway at Second Stage Theatre in 2011. Written with his brother, Adam Braff, Wish I Was Here stars Braff as a struggling L.A. actor, with Kate Hudson as his wife, Gad as his brother and Patinkin as his estranged, ailing father. The film was funded via a Kickstarter campaign which earned $3.1 million from fans, well over its $2 million goal. View Commentscenter_img While he’s making his Broadway debut as the lead of Bullets Over Broadway, Zach Braff will also be prepping his newest film Wish I Was Here for release. The drama, featuring stage stars like Mandy Patinkin and Josh Gad, has just been purchased by Focus Features for $2.75 million following a debut at the Sundance Film Festival. Braff will start singing and dancing in Bullets Over Broadway on March 11 at the St. James Theatre. Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 24, 2014last_img read more

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Edward Bennett on Starring Opposite Nicole Kidman in London’s Photograph 51

first_imgEdward Bennett made headlines in 2008 when he replaced an ailing David Tennant in the Royal Shakespeare Company production of Hamlet. Since then, the actor has gone from further work in Shakespeare to new plays and from strength to strength. He can currently be seen playing Nobel Prize winner Francis Crick at the Noel Coward Theatre in Photograph 51, the Anna Ziegler play about the pioneering English scientist Rosalind Franklin—played here by Nicole Kidman, returning to the London stage after 17 years. The ever-amiable Bennett took time to talk science on stage and acting opposite an Oscar winner.How is it going so far?The reaction so far has been really encouraging. Our play is only 90 minutes, but it’s an epic 90 minutes and incredibly technical. A lot of the previews have been about getting used to the demands of the staging and making sure all the worlds within the play have their own diverse impact. So far so good, I’d say.The production feels like an event—at least from the outside. Does it from the inside, as well?Well, you know as well as I do that the theater is a great leveler. And one of the things [director] Michael Grandage is brilliant at is never making anyone in his company feel like any one part of it is more important than another.Does the “Nicole factor,” so to speak, makes it more than just another play?Sure, and you come in knowing that it’s going to be seen by a lot of people given Nicole’s relatively long hiatus from the British stage and the fuss around [David Hare’s play] The Blue Room and all that. But Grandage is great because once you get started, it’s all hands to the pumps like any other play, really—just with an extra layer of bodyguards at the stage door!Did you see The Blue Room? You may have been too young at the time.It wasn’t that so much as that I had just gone to university [in Cardiff, Wales] and couldn’t afford the trip up to London. But I remember reading about it in the paper and going, “God, that looks amazing” and wishing I could go.What do you think audiences will make of the Nicole Kidman they see onstage this time around?I think they’ll be surprised and that they will find the kind of elegance you can only get with somebody like Nicole Kidman, which is the thing that makes her special, along with her remarkable integrity as an actor. And of course this part means so much to her because of her father [a biochemist who died last year], so you also see something delicate and beautiful in her performance through that.Tell me about your role as Nobel Prize winner Francis Crick.He was a theoretical biophysicist and what stood him apart from other scientists at King’s College was that he and [colleague James] Watson had the vision to look past the facts at what could be the future and as a result was not afraid to make mistakes. And of the two men, Crick was the nice guy—the English chap with wonderful vision who’s incredibly clever and wants to do the right thing while also wanting to win, but Will [Attenborough, who plays Watson] might describe it differently [laughs].What do you think gives this story its dramatic weight?It’s about a historical event that had unequivocal significance to the entire world and will do for the rest of time and at the center of that event is an injustice—[the marginalizing of Franklin’s role in the discovery of DNA]—that had to do with the politics and culture of science and also of the time. And it’s a new play in the West End and that doesn’t happen too often!This play and your work in Orson’s Shadow marks a change from your lengthy immersion in Shakespeare and the classics.I think it’s necessary to change gears at times. All you want as an actor is to do brilliant writing to the best of your ability and the better the writer the better the challenge: Shakespeare is my favorite writer and I could do him forever, but it’s nice to have the opportunity to do new writing and to have an idea about what is happening in the forefront there.As a onetime Hamlet, have you been to the Barbican to catch Benedict Cumberbatch in the role?I haven’t yet but would like to. For a while I didn’t want to see any other Hamlets, though I did see Jude Law’s soon after mine. But I think there was an element of not wanting to be reminded of some of it—not wanting to be the guy who sat there comparing when I’d prefer to just go and enjoy it.Do you know Benedict Cumberbatch at all?No, the only contact I’ve had with him was doing some ADR [looping] for him on Andy Serkis’ new film of The Jungle Book: apparently my voice sounds like his, so I spent three hours doing a tiger. It looks as if it is going to be amazing.Is there a club around London of people who’ve played Hamlet?Not in any formal sense, of course, but there is always a sense of understanding whereby you feel for whoever is playing Hamlet and you hope the production they’re in facilitates them playing it. But I think even if there were a club, I’d be on a waiting list: I only played it because someone else [David Tennant] could not; I’d be at the kids’ table. View Commentslast_img read more

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Rose Sawflies

first_imgDozens of calls and samples of roses with a variety of leaf problems are coming into the University of Georgia Extension office in Bartow County. The most common problem diagnosed this year is injury caused by rose sawflies, also known as rose slugs. These insects do not discriminate on the types of roses on which they feed. Even ‘Knock Out’ roses make a tasty meal for these critters. Home gardeners often ask why ‘Knock Out’ roses are affected if they are supposed to be problem-free. These roses are bred for resistance to certain diseases, like black spot, but are still damaged by a variety of rose-loving insects.Sawfly larvae look similar to the caterpillar stages of moths and butterflies, but have six or more pairs of prolegs behind the three pairs of true legs on their body. True caterpillars have fewer prolegs. Caterpillars can also affect roses in the spring, but the damage they cause is slightly different. Caterpillars chew large holes in the leaves. Sawfly larvae chew a thin layer off the surface of leaves, leaving a skeletonized appearance. If you hold up an affected leaf, you can see light shining through it. This unique “window pane” damage is a classic sign of sawflies. If you look carefully, you might even find a few, tiny, slug-like larvae on the leaves. Some sawfly species can chew holes through the leaves as they get older, but usually you will see both types of damage on the same plant. Sawfly larvae eventually become small, non-stinging wasps that feed on other insects. Begin scouting for sawflies in April or early May. Most sawfly species feed through June and will not return again until next spring. The larvae are often found on the undersides of the leaves, so inspect both sides of the leaves carefully. Keep in mind that the damage caused by sawflies is only to the leaves and mainly affects the appearance of the plant. Plants that are otherwise healthy can tolerate significant feeding damage and will usually put out new leaves by mid-summer.Sawflies are best controlled when they’re young. A physical control tactic is to simply pick them off by hand. A forceful spray of water from a hose can also knock off sawflies. Once dislodged, they cannot climb back onto the plant. Horticultural oil, insecticidal soap and azadirachtin (sometimes called “neem oil”) are low-toxicity, natural, organic insecticides that work well on young sawflies. Synthetic insecticides that control sawflies include acephate (Orthene), carbaryl (Sevin), malathion and diazinon. Avoid using insecticidal dusts and spraying flowers, as many insecticides are highly toxic to bees and other pollinators. Imidacloprid (Bayer Advanced), a systemic insecticide, can be applied to the soil around the roses in spring before feeding activity is noticed. However, once the damage is noticed, it is usually too late for a systemic product to be effective. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) products are effective against leaf-feeding caterpillars, but not on sawflies.For more answers to gardening questions, call your local UGA Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1 or search UGA Extension publications at extension.uga.edu/publications.last_img read more

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