First Type 218SG AIP submarine launched, named Invincible

first_img View post tag: Type 218SG The Republic of Singapore Navy’s first Type 218SG submarine was launched and officially named in Germany on February 18.The 70-meter air-independent propulsion submarine was named Invincible during the ceremony at the thyssenkrupp Marine Systems’ shipyard in Kiel.After construction and outfitting is completed, Invincible will undergo testing before being handed over in 2021.“Closely collaborating with our Defence Science and Technology Agency (DSTA), the RSN oversaw the design of the submarines, before jointly developing them with thyssenkrupp Marine Systems,” Ng Eng Hen, Minister for Defence of the Republic of Singapore said at the ceremony. “I am heartened by the cooperation and efforts of the Singaporean and German industries.”“This first boat of the Type 218SG will mark a next generation of submarines,” Rolf Wirtz, CEO of thyssenkrupp Marine Systems, commented. “They will possess an extensive range of vital capabilities and therewith become a highly capable strategic asset for Singapore and its Navy.”Invincible is the first in a series of four boats of the Type 218SG. The contract for the first two submarines was signed in 2013 and the contract for the second batch in 2017.After handing over the Invincible in 2021, the second submarine is scheduled to be delivered in 2022. The third and fourth submarines are scheduled to follow from 2024 onwards.Singapore’s four new Type 218SG submarines will replace the navy’s current Archer-class and Challenger-class submarines.The RSN has operated the current submarine fleet, built in the 1960s, for about two decades and gained operational experience in local waters. Type 218SG will be the first new-build submarine tailored to meet the RSN’s operating conditions. Manned by 28 sailors, new boats will measure 70 meters in length and displace 2,000 tonnes.Photo: thyssenkrupp Marine SystemsBroadened cooperation between TKMS and DSTAPrior to the launch of the Republic of Singapore Navy’s first Invincible-class submarine, Singapore’s Defence Science and Technology Agency (DSTA) and thyssenkrupp Marine Systems signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) in Kiel to collaborate on new technologies such as additive manufacturing and data analytics for naval applications.Under the agreement, DSTA and thyssenkrupp Marine Systems will explore the use of additive manufacturing as an innovative, cost-effective method for producing submarine spare parts. Both parties will work together on the design, engineering, and qualification of additive manufactured components, which could be tested and trialed on Singapore submarines. Photo: Photo: thyssenkrupp Marine Systems View post tag: RSN Share this article View post tag: TKMS View post tag: RSS Invinciblelast_img read more

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Connecticut’s Folk-Laced Funksters, Goose, Announces Extensive East Coast Tour

first_imgIf you haven’t heard of the funk-folk five-piece Goose hailing from Norwalk, Connecticut, you will soon. The group—composed of guitarist and singer-songwriter Rick Mitarotonda, keyboardist Kristopher Yunker, bassist Trevor Weeks, drummer Ben Atkind, and percussionist Aaron Hagele—has found a unique and captivating sound that is gaining traction across the U.S., combining catchy folk-inspired melodies with funky, danceable beats splashed with tinges of reggae, jazz, blues and rocks (it may sound like a bizarre combination, but trust us, it works).Goose’s extensive summer tour starts on May 31st in Baltimore, Maryland. From their the band will wind their way northward for a number of dates across New England, meeting up with Haley Jane and the Primates on June 2nd and The Nth Power on June 7th. By the end of June and into July, the group will dip south, marking Goose’s first sojourn into the Southeast market Across their tour, with multiple dates across Georgia, Florida, and North and South Carolina. The band will also perform at a number of festivals such as Soupstock, Mad Tea Party, Shadefest, Jerry Jam, Yasgur Road Reunion, and Disc Jam (where the group is featured as a band on the rise). As their summer tour winds to a close in August, Goose will start their month-long residency at the Putnam Den in Saratoga Springs, New York.Disc Jam 2017: From The Little Festival That Could To A Massive Summer AffairThis new tour comes on the tails of their debut album, Moon Cabin, which was recorded in a snowy New Hampshire cabin, mixed and mastered at the Factory Underground in Norwalk, and released early last year. Goose’s Moon Cabin gives listeners a good introduction into what the band is all about—pristine three-part harmonies, huge hooks, adventurous improvisational solos, groovy beats, and melodies that will find their way into your ear and stay there. If Moon Cabin is an introductory lesson, then fans should stay tuned as Goose has a new album in the works and should try catch ’em during this upcoming tour. For more information about Goose, their tour, or Moon Cabin, head over to their website here. You can also check out their upcoming tour dates below as well as listen to Goose perform “Arcadia” to get a taste of the funk-folk magic this group throws downlast_img read more

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Blowing his own horn

first_imgA lively Fred Ho ’79 told a crowd at the New College Theatre Nov. 13 that he died three years ago.“A new Fred Ho had to be born,” said the saxophonist, composer, writer, producer, and political activist of his “rebirth” after a successful three-year battle with colon cancer.Ho addressed the audience as recipient of the fall 2009 Harvard Arts Medal, an honor “bestowed upon a distinguished Harvard or Radcliffe alumnus or alumna, or faculty member who has achieved excellence in the arts and has made a contribution through the arts to education or the public good.”A prolific author and composer, Ho is known for a unique musical style that fuses elements of traditional Chinese and African-American music with jazz to create a rich, multicultural, multidimensional sound. He has published several books and recorded more than 15 albums.At the award ceremony, the artist and onetime Harvard Jazz Band member discussed his life and work with journalist and media commentator Callie Crossley of Harvard’s Nieman Foundation for Journalism. Topics ranged from Ho’s approach to incorporating traditional forms of Eastern music — part of his Chinese-American heritage — into his compositions to his radical politics and his cancer diagnosis.In response to a question about the place of politics in his music, Ho said, “I don’t see it as mechanical, as injecting politics into music. I see music and politics as inseparable. I see the best politics as a creative act, and the best music as art that shakes the world.”In her remarks before presenting the medal, Dean of Harvard College Evelynn Hammonds summed up Ho’s commitment to his art, saying, “Fred Ho has expanded musical definitions and experiences through the integration of Asian-American sensibilities and historical experiences. His music and aesthetic — his voice — are uniquely his, and there is no mistaking the fullness of that voice with any other.”The Harvard Jazz Bands delivered a roiling performance the following evening (Nov. 14) in Lowell Lecture Hall, in a tribute to the honoree that included jazz works by composers such as Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Rollins, and Benny Carter.But the night belonged to Ho and what he calls his “revolutionary earth music.” The concert featured the premiere of his piece, “Take the Zen Train,” which he performed with the Harvard Jazz Bands, as well as with three undergraduate dancers.With his baritone saxophone sounding at times like a thumping base beat, at times like a screeching animal call from the wild, Ho led the student group through his 1975 piece “Liberation Genesis” and into “Take the Zen Train,” what he referred to in the program notes as his “journey to the future without any baggage, without any past or present predeterminations or preconditions.”The performance was the culmination of a three-month residency sponsored by the Office for the Arts’ Learning From Performers program, during which Ho regularly traveled to campus from his home in New York City to work with students on his new piece. The work, commissioned by the Harvard Jazz Bands and the Office for the Arts, is a composition in six movements, and details Ho’s battle with colon cancer.The dancers, covered in green body paint and sporting brightly colored tights and silk pants, performed in front of the musicians, incorporating three forms of movement: ballet, hip-hop, and the Chinese martial art Wushu.Daniel Jáquez, who attended the American Repertory Theater/Moscow Art Theater School Institute for Advanced Theater Training at Harvard University, staged the dance element of the composition and encouraged the students to improvise and copy each other’s styles and steps.For the young musicians and dancers, the work was as rewarding as it was challenging.“I am always interested in looking into the possibilities with movement and how that can be incorporated into my own means of expression,” said Shayna Skal ’13, one of the dancers. A classically trained ballerina, Skal said she loved how the piece challenged her to work “on things that are totally outside my comfort level.”Alto saxophonist Maxwell Nwaru ’10, who performed two solos during Ho’s “Take the Zen Train,” admitted the piece took some getting used to.“It definitely took us by surprise when we first looked at it,” said Nwaru of Ho’s unusual melodic and harmonic structures, rapidly changing tempos, and frequent use of “altered” and “diminished scales,” all departures from more conventional forms of jazz.But over time and after playing with Ho, Nwaru called the final product “amazing” and said the music made him realize “you should never really take anything for granted; it’s a life lesson in many senses … you never know what’s out there.”After the performance, Ho welcomed admirers and autograph seekers, thanked the young artists for their time and effort, and said the end result was more than he could have hoped.“The magic of performance always should be beyond your wildest expectations, and that is what it was.”Tom Lee of the Office for the Arts also contributed to this story.last_img read more

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Worker Participation Committee issues official recommendations

first_imgAnnmarie Soller University Executive Vice President John Affleck-Graves speaksduring a previous forum at McKenna Auditorium on Jan. 26.For the first time since 2001, products licensed by Notre Dame may soon bear the label “Made in China.” The University’s Worker Participation Committee announced its official recommendation to conduct two one-year pilot programs in Chinese manufacturing factories at a public forum Monday.University Executive Vice President John Affleck-Graves, a member of the Worker Participation Committee, said the committee formulated its finalized set of recommendations after two years of careful research and deliberation.According to the website of the Office of the Executive Vice President, University President Emeritus Fr. Edward “Monk” Malloy appointed a Task Force on Anti-Sweatshop Initiatives in 1999. As a result of the task force’s research and recommendations, in 2001 the University released a list of 11 countries, including China, in which manufacturers were prohibited from producing Notre Dame-licensed products.In 2013, Affleck-Graves appointed a committee to review Notre Dame’s Licensing Code of Conducts due to an increasing frequency of interactions between the University and China, according to the website of the Office of the Executive Vice President.The committee chose Verité, a non-profit organization, as its partner during the process of assessing worker participation in Chinese factories, Affleck-Graves said.“We chose China because it was a country that we didn’t produce in at the moment, and it was a country where we could get some cooperation from some of our manufacturers,” Affleck-Graves said. “Although they were making do in other countries, [our manufacturers] were very eager for us to consider China.”He said Verité designed a set of criteria with which it would assess six Chinese factories based upon workers’ rights to freedom of participation. Verité then puts the factories into subcategories based upon their levels of worker participation.The assessment concluded two of the six factories met the standards that the University would require for it to allow for production, and some committee members visited the Chinese factories to meet with the workers and managers after receiving Verité’s assessment, he said.“We like the Verité process,” Affleck-Graves said. “We like the people at Verité. But we felt it was important that we also visit the factories so we could get a sense of whether Verité’s assessment correctly or adequately reflected the views we would have of the conditions in those factories.”Affleck-Graves said the Workers Participation Committee recommends conducting a year-long pilot program in the two Chinese manufacturing plants that received good assessments from Verité. The companies would be reassessed regularly over the course of the year.“This is to determine whether workers’ rights have improved to the extent that factories meet and, more importantly, can sustain over time and under review a standard of performance acceptable to the University of Notre Dame,” Affleck-Graves said.Affleck-Graves said the committee also offers three additional recommendations based off of feedback from a public forum held in January. The committee selected eight factories currently manufacturing products licensed by Notre Dame in Bangladesh, India, El Salvador and Guatemala to assess and compare to the two factories in China.“People asked how we can compare these working conditions in China with other factories … and encouraged us to go to other countries where we commonly do production and use the same assessment tool to see if standards are being met,” Affleck-Graves said.Affleck-Graves said the committee will also use the pilot programs to broaden their assessment criteria to include more issues than worker participation.“There are lots of other issues that are very important in both China and the rest of the world,” Affleck-Graves said. “Things regarding safety, health conditions … what the proposal means is to take the assessment that Verité has done and broaden it to cover all these other issues as well.”The committee’s fourth recommendation is to continue to provide regular opportunities to update the campus community and listen to feedback while the pilot programs are implemented, he said.The Worker Participation Committee is exploring the possibility of assessing all factories producing Notre Dame-licensed products, Affleck-Graves said. He estimated 400 to 500 factories currently produce Notre Dame-licensed products and evaluating each one could take several years.“We’re hoping to take this pilot program and assist the feasibility of … a factory centric policy,” Affleck-Graves said. “We have an instrument that we can take into any factory that allows us to do a rigorous assessment of that factory and on the basis of that assessment to determine whether its appropriate or not to manufacture Notre Dame logo material in that factory.”Affleck-Graves said the committee hopes to provide a model for other universities and companies to follow.“One of Notre Dame’s missions is to be a source for good in the world,” Affleck-Graves said. “There’s a huge amount of manufacturing that goes on in China whether we like it or not. So we can stay out of it and we can influence people by not being in it … but it doesn’t make any difference to those people in China.”Affleck-Graves said University President Fr. John Jenkins reviewed the recommendations before Monday’s forum and said he is comfortable with them. He will likely approve them in the coming weeks, according to Affleck-Graves, after which the recommendations can be enacted.Tags: Chinese manufacturing, John Affleck-Graves, Worker Participation Committeelast_img read more

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SofTrak Synthetic Golf Greens Dealership Established in Vermont

first_imgUnited Turf Industries, developer ofSofTrak Synthetic Golf Greens the high-performance,low-maintenance turf for residential and commercial use that closelysimulates the look and feel of natural grass greens today announcesthe establishment of a new SofTrak dealership in Vermont and Eastern NewYork through Bob Kelly.Kelly, an avid golfer and longtime member at Burlington Country Club, willcover Vermont and the counties of Clinton, Essex, Franklin, St. Lawrence,Warren and Washington in New York with his dealership, SofTrak SyntheticGolf Greens of Vermont, LLC (802.985.9555 or [email protected](link sends e-mail)).Prospective customers can view and test an installed SofTrak SyntheticGolf Green by appointment. Measuring 1,200 square feet, the SofTrak greenfeatures two feet of fringe around its perimeter and five cups built intoits undulating surface. A sand bunker and a couple tee boxes located 15and 30 yards away – from which to hit onto his green from – are scheduledto be added as well.For further information about SofTrak, visit www.unitedturf.com(link is external).A graduate of Middlebury College (VT) and a retired Certified PublicAccountant, Kelly didn’t plan on getting into the burgeoning syntheticputting greens business. However, while researching synthetic turf brandsand the companies that supply them before purchasing a putting andchipping green for his backyard, Kelly had an epiphany.”I saw an excellent business opportunity that simultaneously gave me thehigh-performance green I wanted for my personal use,” says Kelly. “Thefact that PGA Tour players select SofTrak to practice on at their privateresidences, coupled with the comprehensive training SofTrak dealersreceive in the design and installation of the greens made this an easy andexciting decision.”Exclusively supplied by United Turf Industries of Wichita, KS(www.unitedturf.com(link is external)), SofTrak’s sophisticated construction processincludes two layers of crushed stone base, which enables undulations andcontours to be designed into the green as well as quick, thorough drainageof water.SofTrak’s proprietary RQS in-fill — a sand-like material that is uniqueto the industry in that it resists hardening over time — ensures SofTrakgreens provide consistent-rolling putts and accept shots into greens frommore than 125 yards. Also, the surface fibers of SofTrak greens are UV-rayresistant to help maintain the lush, green appearance.Kelly is confident his dealership will thrive in Vermont and Eastern NewYork. He says he could discover no synthetic greens supplier in the area.Also, because residents so value the natural beauty of the area, heexpects them to respond favorably to SofTrak greens, which look likenatural turf greens and blend seamlessly into existing landscapes.In addition to thousands of homeowners and commercial businessesnationwide — from retirement communities and college campuses to golfshops and condominium complexes — PGA TOUR stars Fred Couples and SteveFlesch use SofTrak in the convenient comfort of their respective venues.last_img read more

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Art. V funding campaign takes center stage: House leaders support new judge

first_img February 15, 2004 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Art. V funding campaign takes center stage House leaders support new judges Senior Editor For court officials who have been through two years of budget cuts and limited finances, the January 23 meeting of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on the Judiciary was an unusual experience.Committee members were praising Gov. Jeb Bush for calling for 40 new judges — and saying they wanted even more judges. They also said they’ve heard concerns about a lack of funding for local law libraries and promised to study that issue.And committee members and a representative of the governor’s office were pledging to work closely and amiably to ensure there’s enough money for court operations when the state takes over more trial court funding on July 1. Pursuant to Revision 7 to Art. V approved by voters in 1998, the state must assume a much greater portion of trial court funding no later than the 2004-05 budget year.The question, as Rep. Dan Gelber, D-Miami Beach, put it, is, “When we take the champagne bottle and hit the Art. V boat on July 1, is it going to float?”Subcommittee Chair Rep. Joe Negron, R-Stuart, listed several areas during the meeting where he wants improved funding.“I’m going to make it a strong priority that we fund the new judges that are needed and the Supreme Court has certified,” he said. “The governor’s budget has 40. The House budget will have more than 40.” The Supreme Court certified 88 new judges, 51 circuit, 33 county, and four district court of appeal judges.Negron also said the House should address the judicial assistant pay issue raised by the court. “I want to make sure that judicial assistants are treated fairly and are not paid less just because they are in one part of the state.”When Brad Thomas, representing Bush’s office, presented a summary of the governor’s budget, Negron used the opportunity to discuss funding of law libraries, which has raised concerns around the state. Previously, counties imposed a filing fee surcharge to support the libraries, but will lose that authority when the state assumes a greater share of the responsibility for funding the trial courts as of July 1.“I think libraries are an essential element of the court system,” Negron said. “I would hate for one of our legacies to be that people who have been convicted and are serving time have better access to law libraries than our citizens.”He added, though, he’s not sure who should pay for the libraries, and perhaps local bar associations could help.Thomas replied, “If that issue is important to you, it is important to us. We’ll work with you and we’ll work with the bar associations. That is not a state requirement [to fund the libraries] but that doesn’t mean the state can’t fund it.. . . I think the governor would agree that access to the law is important.”He suggested state officials also begin discussions with the Florida Association of Counties about law libraries.Thomas’ presentation also gave more details about Gov. Bush’s budget, which had been released three days before the committee met.“We believe that this [budget] will ensure due process and ensure the timely resolution of cases and ensure the timely payments of due process expenses to state attorneys and public defenders,” Thomas said. “We appreciate the needs of the court system and I think we’re pretty close.”The governor proposed around $230 million for Revision 7 costs, Thomas noted, of which about $102 million is for extra court costs. Overall, the Bush budget proposed $377 million for the court system, which had requested $454 million.The remainder of the $230 million is for state attorneys, public defenders, and other Revision 7 due process costs, he said.Among the details Thomas gave were:• The governor is proposing about $41 million total for court administration and case management costs, which allows for continuation of the present number of hearing officers and special masters, funding for court interpreter programs, and other administrative and court support programs. In response to a question, Thomas said those figures have no increase in the number of hearing officers or clerks for judges.• The budget allots $41.5 million for conflict of interest attorneys, and $19.7 million to appoint attorneys in dependency cases. The money for conflict attorneys is “the number one dollar issue for Article V,” Thomas said.• $3.6 million has been proposed to improve state attorney pay in four circuits by ensuring their funding is at least at $14 per resident of that circuit. The affected circuits, Thomas said, are the Fifth, Ninth, 15th, and 20th. Rep. Jack Seiler, D-Pompano Beach, asked if there was a similar program for public defenders. Thomas said no, and Seiler wondered if that was discriminatory. “I do think there are some public defenders who are not funded at $7 per capita,” Thomas said, “but the governor thought it was more pressing for state attorneys to receive this funding at this time.”• The governor’s budget gives the Supreme Court chief justice flexibility to reassign positions as necessary to accommodate changes brought about by Revision 7.Thomas noted that the state’s chief financial officer had studied Art. V costs related to Revision 7 for the counties’ 2001-02 budget year, which ended September 30, 2002. The conclusion was those costs were $199 million. Allowing for historical judicial budget hikes of around eight percent, Thomas said that means the governor’s proposed $230 million for Revision 7 is very close.Gelber agreed, although he expressed concern there were inadequate funds to accommodate both inflation and the growth in case filings. He, like others, said changes are likely in succeeding budgets as needs become clearer.“This is a decent first volley at a pretty difficult job,” he said. “Everyone in this room is trying to divine what a state budget will look like for something that’s never been in the state budget.” Art. V funding campaign takes center stage: House leaders support new judgelast_img read more

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Nor’easter May Slow Long Island Thanksgiving Travel

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York This map shows a nor’easter tracking over Long Island this week.A nor’easter is forecast to drench Long Island in rain on Thanksgiving Eve while travelers are en-route to spend the holiday with their families, but is expected to clear up by Thursday.The storm system will arrive Tuesday afternoon or evening with winds reaching nearly 30 mph and continue through Wednesday, bringing up to four inches of precipitation to the tri-state area, according to Upton-based National Weather Service meteorologists.“Some of this will be heavy at times with possible urban and small stream flooding,” the agency said in a statement.The same storm is expected to blanket parts of New England and upstate New York in snow, making driving more difficult for college students returning home to LI on what is traditionally the busiest travel day of the year.The storm is forecast to give way to a mostly sunny, breezy Turkey Day with a high of 36 and a low of 25.That weather is expected to hold through Sunday, when the forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies and temps in the 40s.last_img read more

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Time to set your leadership goals

first_img 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Dan BergerA new year is the time for setting new resolutions. While, personally, I don’t make resolutions, I do set new goals each year for myself. And, like most, some of these goals are aimed at improving my personal life. However, here’s a new challenge: create for yourself goals that will help you build a better organization and be a better leader.International Business Times opinion writer Elisha Maldonado encouraged leaders to think beyond just setting financial goals for one’s organization. She noted, “making any company better depends on how leaders retain and leverage their human assets as a distinctive competitive advantage.”She listed eight key areas where leaders can assess their “leadership subsystem” to help their organizations do better this year. Here are my picks from her list:– Organizational purpose. Does your organization’s vision for its future inspire your members and your employees? continue reading »last_img read more

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Nasa SpaceX mission: Dragon capsule docks with space station

first_img– Advertisement – “Low-Earth orbit for over 50 years was the domain of governments. Now, we’ve seen commercial companies, SpaceX being the first, take astronauts to the space station, with Boeing set to follow, hopefully sometime next year,” commented former Nasa astronaut Leroy Chiao. last_img

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Melvin D Black

first_imgMelvin first started school in Versailles, but when the family moved to Osgood, he became a proud Osgood Cowboy.  It could be said he was one of the last Cowboys to stand, as he graduated in the class of 1960 that being the last class before the Jac-Cen-Del School began.  He enjoyed school and liked to play basketball, earning his letterman jacket.  Who would have ever thought that Melvin’s jacket is seen by numerous people every year, as it is on display at the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame in New Castle.After high school he entered the work force, first working for Gilmore and Goldie Reynolds in the gas business.  He also enjoyed being part of the former “Teen Club” in Osgood; this led to him being asked to go to a church hay ride.  This hay ride would take him on a wonderful adventure for the rest of his life, you see Mary Lee (Schutte) was the lady doing the asking, and the two were united in marriage on August 10, of 1962. They have been married for almost 55 years, and were blessed with 5 children.  Shortly after marriage, the Reynolds sold the gas business to Empire Gas, so the couple moved to Columbus, Indiana for a couple years before returning back to their local roots and opening Service Central in Versailles, which provided sales and service on various appliances and TVs.  Melvin then found his true calling though, helping customers get into an automobile.  He made car selling classy, never pushing you, and always honoring what he would say.  For 30 plus years he sold cars throughout the area.He had recently joined the local Historical Society, and was looking forward to helping.  He had previously attended Delaware United Methodist Church for years.  He was prior member of the Jac-Cen-Del School Board, Osgood Library Board, and former member of the Osgood Fire Department.He is survived by wife Mary Lee of Osgood, sons Jeff (Christy) of Lawrenceburg and Jason (fiancé Elma) of Indianapolis, daughters Tena (Mouse) Vankirk of Napoleon and Vickie (Scott) Smith of Batesville, grandchildren Kelly and Bailey Black, Trent Smith, and Heather (Steve) Huff, and 2 great grandchildren, sisters Emma Lee Beagle of Carmel, Shirla Jones of Napoleon, Joyce Demetriades of Fort Wayne, and Geneva Kennedy of Versailles.  He was preceded in death by daughter Teresa Lynn, along with brothers Roy, William, Paul, Wayne, Kenny, and Sisters Berta Jean, Mary and Wilma.Visitation will be held on Wednesday June 28 from 3:00-7:00 pm. at Neal’s Funeral Home in Osgood, and Funeral services will also be at the funeral home on Thursday June 29 at 10:00 am., with doors opening at 9:00 am.  Memorials may be made out to Mud Pike Cemetery or American Heart Association in care of the funeral home.last_img read more

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