The Best Moments Of All Good Music Festival: A Playlist

first_imgEarlier this week, the beloved All Good Music Festival announced their retirement from full scale festival events. The festival was an annual tradition that dated back to 1997, and its demise shows the unfortunate consequences of the so-called “festival bubble.” Still, with nearly 20 years of history and a total of 18 festivals, All Good supported the jam music scene through some of its more difficult times. Though it had many homes over those 18 years, All Good looms large in our hearts.To honor the festival’s legacy, we put together some highlights from years past! Enjoy some of the best jams around, below:-1999: Jeffree Lerner (STS9) joins String Cheese Incident for “Mouna Bowa > Drums”:-2000: moe. heats things up with a scorching set:-2001: Leftover Salmon rocks All Good with “High Five”:-2002: The Bomb Squad get funky on the All Good stage:-2003: Acoustic Syndicate lets loose with a great set:-2004: Dark Star Orchestra keeps ’em Grateful with a classic 1987 Dead show:-2005: Umphrey’s McGee calls on SCI’s Jason Hann and Michael Kang for a fun performance:-2006: GRAB (Mike Gordon, Joe Russo, Trey Anastasio, Marco Benevento) make their All Good debut:-2007: Bob Weir brings Ratdog out to the West Virginia All Good fest:-2008: Widespread Panic welcomes Derek Trucks, Susan Tedeschi, Jeff Sipe and more:-2009: Lotus gives Nintendo fans a little “Zelda” loving:-2010: Bob Weir brings his Grateful Dead bandmate, Phil Lesh, to All Good for a Furthur performance-2011: Pretty Lights keeps the late night dance party going strong:-2012: The Allman Brothers Band visit All Good, delivering this “One Way Out” with Roosevelt Collier:-2013: Some full set video action from Papadosio, Yonder Mountain String Band, Keller Williams w/ Travelin’ McCourys, and Primus: -2015: Joe Russo returns with Almost Dead, featuring this “Franklin’s Tower” for the ages:last_img read more

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4x100m Penn Relays record by Edwin Allen?

first_imgWhat do you get when you add the fastest Class Three sprinter of all time to a terrific Class One 4×100 metres team?With Edwin Allen High School coach Michael Dyke doing the mathematics, the result could be a new record for the Penn Relays 4×100 metres. Word from the inside is that new Class Three 200m record holder Kevona Davis will join Dyke’s undefeated Class One unit when Edwin Allen lines up at the Penn Relays on April 27.Kashieka Cameron, Patrice Moody and Shellece Clarke have handled the first three legs all season, with team captain Khamoy Farquharson on anchor for two early-season wins. Long jumper and sprinter Tania Campbell took over when Farquharson suffered an injury and closed wins at the Gibson McCook Relays, Boys and Girl Championships’ and the UTech Classic. With Campbell on anchor, these Frankfield flyers have the fastest high school times of the year, 44.56 at Gibson McCook and 44.50 at Champs.Davis could take over the anchor leg at Penn since Carifta Under-20 Trials winner Cameron, 2016 Girls’ Champs 100 winner Moody and Clarke, a 100m champion in Classes Two, Three and Four, are settled in their established roles.Davis brings times of 11.43 seconds for the 100 and 23.07 seconds for the 200 – the new Champs Class Three record – to the task. Together, the Cameron-Moody-Clarke-Davis line-up has more than enough speed to reach the 2004 Vere Technical High School record of 44.32 seconds.GOOD WEATHERIf the tall 15-year-old Davis acquits herself well and if the weather is as good as it was when Vere set the existing mark, the record is within reach. According to www.bbc.com/weather, the conditions’ could favour fast running. On Thursday, when the girls competition begins at Penn, the prediction is for sun with a high temperature of 24 degrees Celsius. On Friday, when the finals are run, the forecast is for a high of 26 degrees Celsius and partly cloudy skies.There are other teams in the hunt. Holmwood Technical and Hydel High became the second and third teams to break 45 flat in Class Two at Champs and both schools could bolster their line-up.last_img read more

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Cellular environment affects type of tumor development

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 12 2018Liver cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Two different forms of primary liver cancer cover the majority of cases: About 10 to 20 percent of those affected develop a bile duct carcinoma within the liver (intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma; ICC), the far higher proportion of liver cancers are hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In recent years, in particular, the number of patients with the highly invasive intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinomas increased noticeably, although both tumor types show overlaps regarding their risk factors. A team of researchers led by Prof. Lars Zender from the University Hospital Tübingen and German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) now elegantly demonstrated that the surrounding cellular environment with its dying liver cells determines the path taken by tumor cells. The results will be published in the prestigious journal Nature on September 12, 2018.While progress in early detection and treatment has led to a reduction in mortality for many other types of cancer, there has been a dramatic increase in mortality among patients who have cancer within the liver. Especially fatty liver, which is becoming increasingly common in western countries, now leads to chronically pre-damaged livers in many patients, which are a risk factor for liver cancer. Strikingly, patients with the same predisposition or liver damaging risk factors either develop hepatocellular carcinoma or intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma.Both cancers are different regarding their behavior and are also treated differently.The microenvironment of cancer cells, and in particular, the special form of cell death occuring in this environment, proved to be decisive for the development of the respective type of cancer. The scientists showed that precursors of cancer cells in whose environment cells died by apoptosis, the classical cell death, developed into hepatocellular carcinoma. Precancerous cells, in whose environment cells died due to necroptosis, led to intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma. In necroptosis, the cell membrane dissolves, and the cell content causes inflammation in the environment of the cancer cell, while in classical programmed cell death small vesicles are formed which are eliminated by the immune system.Related StoriesExciting study shows how centrioles center the process of cell divisionSlug serves as ‘command central’ for determining breast stem cell healthNew study reveals ‘clutch’ proteins responsible for putting T cell activation ‘into gear’The results could be verified both in mouse models and in human tissue samples. Cancer researcher Xin Wei Wang from the Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis (Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, USA) contributed crucial human analysis data, and Oliver Bischof, a distinguished epigeneticists from the Institut Pasteur (Laboratory of Nuclear Organization and Oncogenesis) in Paris, unraveled how the microenvironment affects gene regulation in the cancer cell.What do the findings mean for clinical practice? “Future research will have to investigate whether the direct cell environment affects not only the type of tumor development but also the therapy,” says Professor Lars Zender. In the treatment of HCC with chemoembolization, it has already been observed that a part of the original liver cancer can turn into a bile duct carcinoma. This could be a reason why the cancer no longer responds to the original therapy. “We may be on the trail of a therapy resistance mechanism for liver cancer,” explains the renowned oncologist and “we hope that the findings will inform novel therapeutic options in the future.”​ Source:https://uni-tuebingen.de/last_img read more

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