Metallica, Soundgarden, Primus & More To Perform At Rock On The Range Festival

first_imgFor the 11th straight year, rock musicians and their fans will flock to the MAPFRE Stadium in Columbus, Ohio for the annual Rock on the Range festival. Taking place from May 19-21, the festival today has released a killer lineup of rock n’ roll stars.Headlining the event will be Metallica, Soundgarden and Korn, topping a lineup that includes The Offspring, Volbeat, Primus, Bush, Chevelle, Papa Roach, Seether, Coheed & Cambria, Taking Back Sunday, Sum 41, Skillet, Gojira, Dillinger Escape Plan and so many more. This will also be Soundgarden’s first live show since 2015, and the inclusion of Primus suggests that Les Claypool will be returning to that project next year.You can see the full lineup below, and head to the festival’s website for more information.last_img read more

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Bahamas bishop hits out at homosexuals

first_img Share FaithLifestyle Bahamas bishop hits out at homosexuals by: – November 16, 2011 Sharing is caring! 34 Views   no discussions Tweetcenter_img Bishop Simeon Hall. Image via: blackchristiannews.comNASSAU, Bahamas — Baptist Bishop Simeon Hall on Monday urged homosexuals to seek help to turn away from their “non-productive and deadly practice”, but a popular member of the gay, lesbian, bi-sexual and transgender community in The Bahamas denied his claim that many men are absent from families because of their sexual preferences.Hall released the statement after a Nassau Guardian article revealed that the prevalence of HIV/AIDS in The Bahamas among men who have sex with men (MSM) is near 14 percent, which is nearly double the eight percent documented in 2008 by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS).Director of the National HIV/AIDS Programme Dr Perry Gomez pointed out recently that that percentage increase is a result of better reporting, data collection methods and better access to the MSM community.However, Hall said on Monday that members of the public should be concerned by the facts revealed by Gomez, which indicate that MSMs may be an increasingly vulnerable group.He called homosexuality “anti-family”.“This sexual practice cannot produce anything and now we are seeing that, according to these latest statistics, it is deadly,” Hall said.“Homosexuality… is anti-family [and] it goes against what God has ordained. It is deadly.”However, Erin Greene, a human rights activist, said there are many additional factors to consider when drawing conclusions from the HIV/AIDS prevalence percentages, including the fact that not all MSMs identify themselves as homosexual.“Consider circumstantial bi-sexuality; men in prison who are being raped, for example,” Greene said. “They may not identify as being gay but may continue to engage in homosexual sex for security reasons or for personal psychological reasons.“When they leave prison they have no intention as identifying as gay or acknowledging their time in prison having sex with other men.”A circumstantial bi-sexual by definition is a man or woman who is primarily heterosexual but bi-sexual because of their circumstances. In prison, men and women do not have access to the opposite sex.Hall claimed the presence of strong “male men” in the building of family and community is vital and indispensable.“Men absent, men dying and men unavailable to participate in family life — all these negatively impact our communities, already on the edge of disintegration,” he said.Hall added, “I wish to affirm that homosexuals and lesbians are human beings just like everyone else. I do not demonize them but I hurriedly urge them to seek help to turn away from this non-productive and deadly practice.”Greene claimed that homosexual men who are absent from the families often choose to be unavailable to seek environments where they will not be discriminated against because of a non-traditional sexual preference.Gomez said that Jamaica, which had a 31.8 percent prevalence rate of HIV/AIDS among MSMs in 2008, has in comparison been ahead of The Bahamas because the country has been more organized with the MSM community.“We knew the focus of our epidemic in the beginning in The Bahamas was amongst cocaine addicts and it spread from them to us,” Gomez said.“Why they were vulnerable was because of the drug and the high number of sexual partners with both sexes. They remain a vulnerable group in our community. In the next two years we hope to have better data on it.”The government of The Bahamas is co-sponsoring the 2011 Caribbean HIV Conference November 18 – 21.By Royston Jones JrNassau Guardian Staff Reporter Share Sharelast_img read more

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As road to Final 4 gets tougher, Knights confident of chances

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “It’s like David and Goliath,” compared Rey Nambatac, whose side will be underdog going into the tiff.The 23-year-old guard acknowledges the tall task Letran at hand, but he’s confident that the Knights can pull off the upset.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smog“We’ll go through the eye of the needle again. But it’s a good thing that we’re used in this situation. It has happened to us numerous times before in my five years here and we’ll go through it again. But these hardships make our journey special if we can get through it,” he said.The Knights were on a receiving end of an 81-74 loss to the Red Lions in their first round clash, but with stakes at an all-time high, Nambatac believes that his side is more than just motivated. Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. PVL: Arellano blanks Adamson, closes in on bronze Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Rey Nambatac. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netLetran may have the inside track for the last Final Four spot in NCAA Season 93, but the path to the playoffs remains rocky as ever.And the Knights’ first stumbling block is no less than fierce rival San Beda on Friday.ADVERTISEMENT It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hourscenter_img Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? “San Beda is a tough team, but everything is possible if we believe on each other,” he said. “Even though how strong the opponent is, we’ll play as a team and we’ll believe that we can beat them.”With Letran carrying an 8-8 card, all its hoping for is a sweep of its remaining games against San Beda and St. Benilde to clinch the last Final Four spot.A loss in one of its games, however, opens the possibility of a playoff between San Sebastian or Arellano if they all end the eliminations carrying identical 9-9 records.But coach Jeff Napa remains positive that the Knights will be able to achieve their set goals.“We’ll just make some adjustments. We’re confident and we still believe that since we built this team, we can go a long way,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award MOST READ LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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Dont play with guns Costa Ricas police tell schoolchildren

first_imgJenifer Lizano lives in one of the five most violent places in Costa Rica, the neighborhood of León XIII in the northern San José canton of Tibás.“Guns are used here on a daily basis and there are shootings at any time of the day,” she said.In the first 10 months of 2013, 15 people have been murdered in the urban neighborhood.Some victims are children, including Lizano’s 14-year-old nephew, who was killed by a stray bullet two years ago. Since then, Lizano campaigns against toy guns. Her organization, the International League for Women for Peace and Freedom (LIMPAL), partners with law enforcement agencies to raise awareness about the risks associated with gun ownership.“Youngsters here no longer long for a flashy car or a new pair of shoes. Now they compete for getting more weapons,” Lizano said. Since 2010, the Costa Rican Justice Ministry and the United Nations Children’s Fund have organized toy gun exchanges in which children receive more educational items instead of ones that promote violence. LIMPAL plans to organize a similar exchange before the Christmas season.Officials from the Justice Ministry also participate in school talks about ways to prevent violence.“The most important thing is that children learn about the risks and dangers of weapons. We give them advice on how to act if they see an abandoned gun; we ask them not to touch it and to report it to an adult,” Justice Vice Minister Max Loria said. Since the campaign started, officials have talked to more than 30,000 children.According to a 2012 small arms survey, violence in Costa Rica is concentrated in urban areas, and 70 percent of homicides occur in cities with more than 50,000 people. The Judicial Investigation Police (OIJ) reports that the number of firearms used in assaults increased by 59 percent from 2005 to 2011, and three out of 10 armed robberies are committed using a toy or replica gun.In addition to law enforcement, the National Police also fights crime with preventive measures including the organization of tournaments and art activities in elementary schools.“We work with 400 children in high-risk communities in San José and our goal is that none of them becomes a criminal,” said Roberto Ortega, coordinator of preventive programs at the National Police in San José. He added that the program has helped to improve the police’s image among children and raise awareness regarding the consequences of getting involved in criminal activities.Lizano believes that parents can teach children to avoid weapons and violence.“My son was born and raised in one of the most violent neighborhoods in Costa Rica. But the place where you live doesn’t make you a good or bad person,” she said.  Before the start of this year’s Christmas season, Lizano started posting on Facebook and talking to media about the dangers associated with giving children toys that promote violence. Whenever she can talk with a parent, Lizano tells them not to allow children to even imitate a gun with their finger.   Facebook Comments No related posts.last_img read more

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