New Director of Arts & Business West Midlands

first_img  28 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis New Director of Arts & Business West Midlands About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Gavin previously worked as Director of Projects for A&B, where he led on the development and introduction of the successful New Partners investment programme. He also wrote the ‘Arts & Business Sponsorship Manual’ during that time. Arts & Business, the national charity that encourages new and sustainable relationships between business and the arts, has appointed Gavin Buckley as Director of Arts & Business West Midlands.Gavin will manage a team of seven staff and oversees the work of a number of freelance artists working on Arts & Business projects throughout the region. During the next twelve months Gavin and the team will be working in partnership with Birmingham Chamber of Commerce and Birmingham City Council to deliver The Year of Arts in Business.Gavin joins A&B from Muscular Dystrophy Campaign where he was Director of Regional Fundraising for the past four years. Advertisementcenter_img Howard Lake | 2 October 2005 | News Tagged with: Management Recruitment / people AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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100 cases of child abuse in Mid West a month

first_imgTwitter No vaccines in Limerick yet Email Advertisement Population of Mid West region increased by more than 3,000 in past year by Bernie English [email protected] were almost 900 cases of child abuse reported to child protection services in the Mid West during the first nine months of last year, a massive increase from the previous year’s figures.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up And of the 868 reports submitted from Limerick, Clare and Tipperary, 491 so far have been deemed serious enough to warrant close investigation.According to the figures obtained from Tusla, the National Child and Family Agency, the number of reports in the Mid West for the entirety of 2013 were 696, far short of the first nine months figures for 2014.There are no figures available as yet for 2015 or the final quarter of 2014.Of the reports in 2013, 529 required further investigation or action from the social services, a stage process known as ‘initial assessment’.The reporting figures in the Mid West have been increasing steadily since 2011, when there were 420 reported cases of abuse or neglect and 2012, when 593 cases were reported.The allegations cover such issues as child neglect or abuse of a sexual, physical, or emotional nature.The process of initial assessment involves meeting the child, the child’s parents, and contacting relevant professionals. The process is aimed at determining if there is, in principal, a case to answer.The next step, if social and child protection workers are unhappy with the situation, is to carry out risk assessment may need to be carried out.After investigations, it may be determined that a child should be taken into care because he or she is at risk.Figures for the number of children taken into care as a result of complaints in the Mid West are currently not available.A spokesperson for Tusla said that the agency “responds to every child protection or welfare referral it receives”.Currently, more than 90 per cent of Irish children in care are in foster care. Linkedin More than €250,000 greenway funding for Limerick and East Clare First Irish death from Coronavirus TAGSchild abusefeaturedMid WestMidwestTusla center_img WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsBreaking news100 cases of child abuse in Mid West a monthBy Bernie English – March 19, 2015 1085 Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Facebook Previous articleLimerick Council response raises fury in GarryowenNext articleLimerick TD seeks public inquiry into republican abuse claims Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. Shannondoc operating but only by appointment Printlast_img read more

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A TOUGH ILLNESS THAT REQUIRES TOUGH MEDICINE By Jim Redwine

first_img GAVEL GAMUT By Jim RedwineWeek of March19, 2018A TOUGH ILLNESS THAT REQUIRES TOUGH MEDICINESome medical conditions, say the flu, can be diagnosed and easily cured. Of course, if the flu is actually pneumonia the patient may not fare so well. Some medical conditions even if correctly identified may not be easily treated, certain cancers for example. And some cancers even if properly addressed may metamorphosize into others that are fatal.In our Body Politic a serious condition we must either deal with or be permanently affected by is our Child In Need of Services problem. And even if we do not ignore it, a potentially fatal mistake, the cures we apply will be unavoidably complicated and expensive. Of course, to ignore a cancer is to court our own demise.In this frenetic world of crisis-a-minute news and infuriatingly complex day-to-day existence, we just do not have the time or energy or money to be aware of and address all the problems that may seriously affect us. So we can be forgiven if we would prefer to ignore the extremely complex problems of child and family welfare, especially other people’s children and families.But just as a spot on the skin may be the harbinger of disaster if ignored, if we do not attempt to help an abused or neglected child now, that child or that family may cause all of us harm later. And that harm may be a great deal more difficult and expensive than it would cost to prevent it now.The complexity of our child welfare problem is highlighted by the Indiana Legislature’s scattergun reaction to the criticism of the former State Director of the Department of Family and Child Services who resigned in despair. Just in this year’s session of the General Assembly, fourteen bills concerning DCS matters were introduced. This is a positive sign but just as “all politics is local” we in Posey County, Indiana, just as each of Indiana’s other 91 counties, must take some responsibility for our own situation.In each county, the general needs may be similar but specific needs may call for different approaches. Any solution should include numerous institutions such as the Department of Child Services, the schools, all police agencies, the County Council and Board of Commissioners, the Prosecutor’s office, the medical and mental health agencies and the courts. Of course, the most important constituency in this integrated approach must be the public along with the news media.As I indicated last week I have plenty to do just in the Posey Circuit Court so that’s where I’ll concentrate next week as we work together to craft a comprehensive approach to diagnosing and treating our Child In Need of Services situation in Posey County.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to www.jamesmredwine.comFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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ROTC units host vigil to honor veterans

first_imgChris Collins | The Observer In observance of Veteran’s Day, the Notre Dame ROTC units stood vigil for 24 hours at the Clarke Memorial Fountain, known popularly as “Stonehenge,” to honor the men and women who have served.The celebration of Veteran’s Day began at 5 p.m. on Nov. 10, when a 24-hour vigil at the Clarke Memorial Fountain, known by students as “Stonehenge,” began. According to a University press release, cadets and midshipmen from all three ROTC units stood guard at the four corners of the fountain during the vigil. This 24-hour vigil is a traditional event that Notre Dame ROTC units hold each year, according to the release.The vigil concluded with a ceremony on the quad on Nov. 11, exactly 24-hours after the guarding of the memorial began. Cadets and midshipmen filled the quad, standing in rank to show respect for all the living and deceased men and women who served before them.The ceremony began with the introduction of the official party, which included Fr. Pete McCormick, director of Campus Ministry; James Wagenbach, former U.S. solider and Vietnam veteran; Lt. Col. Christopher Pratt, commanding officer of Notre Dame Army ROTC and professor of military science; Cmrd. Frederick Landau, executive officer of Notre Dame Naval ROTC and professor of naval science; and Col. Frank Rossi, commanding officer of Notre Dame Air Force ROTC and professor of aerospace studies.The introduction was followed by a playing of the national anthem, a prayer led by McCormick and a brief history of Veteran’s Day.“By guarding the memorial, we are showing reverence and respect for the veterans and the fallen heroes,” Cadet Maj. Robert Szabo said. “We are remembering what those men did in those wars.”All cadets and midshipman who guarded the memorial were honored during the ceremony.“The 24-hour vigil they just completed is not only a tribute to veterans, but a testament to [the cadets’ and midshipmen’s] commitment, strength and character,” Col. Pratt said in a speech during the ceremony. “Although most have yet to serve, they represent the best and the brightest of our country. They chose a path of service to this great nation that less than one half of 1 percent choose these days.”Pratt then introduced Wagenbach, the keynote speaker. In his introduction, Pratt noted that Wagenbach was both a Notre Dame alum and veteran. According to Pratt, Wagenbach served as a recon platoon leader and armored cavalry troop commander in Vietnam. He was medically discharged for wounds received in combat and decorated with a Silver Star Medal, the third highest military decoration for valor, awarded for gallantry and action against the enemy.Wagenbach spoke about a Notre Dame very different than the one students know today. In his speech, Wagenbach said during his time at Notre Dame in the 1960s, there were 6,000 total undergraduate students, 4,000 of which participated in ROTC.“James Wagenbach is both an American treasure and hero, and we are honored to have him with us,” Pratt said.The ceremony concluded as veterans in attendance were asked to stand and be recognized. Finally, taps was played to honor those veterans who passed.“To honor the men and women who have served is of the utmost importance,” Szabo said. “Holding a 24-hour vigil for Veteran’s Day, culminating in the ceremony on the quad, is a great way to show the importance of Veteran’s Day on campus.”Tags: Air Force ROTC, Army ROTC, Clarke Memorial Fountain, Naval ROTC, ROTC, Veterans Day God. Country. Notre Dame.On Nov. 11, this traditional Notre Dame motto took on an even deeper significance as Veteran’s Day was observed on North Quad by Notre Dame’s Army, Navy and Air Force ROTC units.last_img read more

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