VIR2 Ltd and BT offer multi-channel donations to charities

first_img Howard Lake | 13 December 2010 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  34 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Mobile fundraising solutions provider Vir2 Ltd is working with BT to enable charities to offer donors a choice of low-cost payment methods for collecting donations. As a result Vir2 can now offer charities the option to support integrated telephone and SMS campaigns.Charities using the platform will only have to ask for donors’ personal information once, yet still be able to recognise the donor regardless of the way the donor contacted them.The system also enables charities to trigger repeat donations by text and take the donation in the most efficient way, whether that is by card or text donation, depending on the amount.Telephone donations will be taken by BT SafePay, BT’s PCI DSS Level 1 payments system, an automated telephone interactive voice response (IVR) system for securely collecting credit and debit card donations. It enables charities and other organisations to avoid the expense of using call centres and “guarantees that every call is answered”.Launched by Agilemedia, BT’s Wholesale interactive communications and payments division, the IVR platform in conjunction with the BT Buynet card payment solution has already been used by BBC Children in Need , BBC Wildlife, Soccer Aid, Comic Relief and the recent Disaster Emergency Committee’s appeal for Pakistan.The platform can handle Gift Aid instructions, so that donors can register a declaration that they are a UK taxpayer.Vir2 say that “the fully automated platform can be up and running in a matter of hours and allows calls to be managed 24 hours a day”. Once money is pledged, the payment is authorised and deposited with the charity within 48 hours.“This deal is about giving our charity clients and their donors’ choice,” said Roger Craven, CEO, Vir2. “Our charity clients can now access a robust, secure and instant method of handling large value donations, which fits perfectly with our text platform which handles low value donations.”www.vir2.co.uk Tagged with: Digital Technology VIR2 Ltd and BT offer multi-channel donations to charitieslast_img read more

Read More
Government urged to explain disappearance of reporter Hayatullah Khan

first_img May 16, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Government urged to explain disappearance of reporter Hayatullah Khan Organisation News January 28, 2021 Find out more Pakistani journalist critical of the military wounded by gunfire News Follow the news on Pakistan June 2, 2021 Find out more PakistanAsia – Pacific April 21, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information Pakistani supreme court acquits main suspect in Daniel Pearl murder Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists PakistanAsia – Pacific News RSF_en Reporters Without Borders has called on the Pakistani government to explain the disappearance of Hayatullah Khan, journalist on the Urdu-language daily Ausaf and the European Press Photo Agency (EPA), who was kidnapped on 5 December 2005 in Mir Ali, North Waziristan.The press freedom organisation said it noted the statement by a US diplomat on 10 May 2006 that the United States was not implicated in the disappearance. “Following the statement by the United States we again call on the Pakistani government, and particularly its federal information minister, Muhammad Ali Durrani, to explain the disappearance of Hayatullah Khan and to mobilise all the necessary resources to resolve this case which has gone on too long”, it said.“We urge Muhammad Ali Durrani to mark his start in the government with a strong signal, by providing detailed information about the journalist,” it added.US Consul in Peshawar, Mike Spangler, said on 10 May that the United States had “read the reports on the disappearance of Hayatullah Khan (…), but is not in possession of any information about him.”The journalist was on his way to Khajoori in North Waziristan to cover a student demonstration on 5 December 2005, when five men armed with AK-47s stopped his vehicle and bundled him into another car.A few days earlier, the journalist had investigated the circumstances of the death of an Arab head of al-Qaeda, Hamza Rabia. The Pakistani Army had said that the jihadist had been killed with four other people in an accidental munitions explosion at the home of a man named as Mohammad Siddiq – who turned out to be the journalist’s uncle.Hayatullah Khan had contradicted the military report, saying that Rabia had been killed by an American missile and supported his claim with photographs taken at the scene of the incident. Villagers who heard the explosion also backed up the version of an attack by a drone or plane.Reporters Without Borders is backing the campaign by the Tribal Union of Journalists (TUJ) which has been actively trying to find Khan since December 2005. Reporters Without Borders urged the Pakistani information minister to do his utmost to bring an end to the kidnapping of journalist Hayatullah Khan (photo), after a US spokesman said on 10 May 2006 that the United States had no involvement in his disappearance. The journalist was abducted by armed men on 5 December 2005, a few days after he investigated the death of an al-Qaeda chief in North Waziristan. to go further Newslast_img read more

Read More
Debate reveals tension about east side growth

first_img Pinterest Church leaders condemn mayor’s disparaging comments Previous articleOdessa to become a TEDx siteNext articleELDER: Instead of ‘Infrastructure Investment,’ How About Killing Davis-Bacon? admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By admin – January 11, 2018 Local NewsGovernment Debate reveals tension about east side growth Landgraf prepares for state budget debate Pinterest Twitter Construction proceeds on the downtown hotel and convention center Wednesday after a heated debate at Tuesday’s city council meeting became a focal point between investor Sondra Eoff and city councilman Malcom Hamilton, which was supposed to be a discussion about the “pros and cons of single-member district representation, at-large representation, and strong mayor representation.” Facebookcenter_img WhatsApp Twitter WhatsApp Home Local News Government Debate reveals tension about east side growth Odessa’s District 5 City Councilman Filiberto Gonzales said his opposition to a proposal to restructure the City Council is really not about civil rights for him. Gonzales also said he does not see the changes as a way of weakening Hispanic voting strength for positions on a board he argues does not make racially polarized decisions.“To me this is about power — this is about power” Gonzales said in an interview after the meeting, adding “I have never used the word racism, discrimination. At the end of the day I want to make sure that we go with facts. I want to go do what’s right for the city of Odessa.”It was a significant acknowledgement that came less than a week after Gonzales lent his support to a group opposing the proposed changes that said the restructuring would illegally discriminate against Odessa minorities by diluting their votes. If voters approved the changes, an attempt to block them from taking effect could hinge on that being true.But Gonzales’ comments also framed the full council’s discussion of the restructuring proposal on Tuesday — a more than 45 minute debate on Odessa development, focusing on the east side of town that opponents of the proposed council restructuring say the changes would favor.The meeting Tuesday at times became contentious, with council members and citizen speakers talking over each other.Three members of the City Council — Gonzales, District 3 Councilwoman Barbara Graff and District 1 Councilman Malcolm Hamilton — combined last month to deny a May election so voters can decide on the restructuring proposal that would add a new council position elected by voters city wide and give the mayor a vote. Graff had argued the changes would be discriminatory, and so did Hamilton, who also said they are “evil” and “racist.”But Gonzales said his concern is not that the at-large positions would disadvantage Hispanics — it’s what he said is a wealth gap in the eastern part of town and other parts of the city, combined with a greater amount of registered voters in east-side District 2.“I don’t see it as a racially motivated agenda for anybody,” Gonzales said.In any case, the denial prompted a petition drive that is underway to force an election.On Tuesday, the entire City Council had been scheduled to discuss “pros and cons of single-member district representation, at-large representation, and strong mayor representation.” But they barely did so.Hamilton at point engaged in a heated back-and-forth with Sondra Eoff, who with her husband is investing about $50 million in the city-supported downtown hotel and conference center, as she tried to make the case for her support of the council restructuring proposal. She was also arguing that east Odessa, where she lives, is part of the city where the City Council should support development.Hamilton questioned her altruism in pursuing the multimillion facility in his district, which city officials sought as a way to kick off a broader redevelopment of the long blighted area.“You are doing it for your own benefit as private business, let’s be clear about that,” Hamilton said.Eoff said called the remark “unbelievable and ungrateful,” said Hamilton had “done nothing to help us in this project.”She said she wanted to help south Odessa, where she used to live. And Eoff, who is Hispanic, said efforts to paint the restructuring proposal as driven by racial prejudice as offensive to her.“To say that everyone in District 2 is rich and powerful and doesn’t care about the rest of Odessa, I take offense to,” Eoff said.Often confusion and inaccuracy reigned, as the City Council revisited a controversial decision in May to deny incentives for an oilfield equipment supplier, Weir Oil and Gas, that eventually abandoned plans to build a $25 million facility in Odessa in favor of Midland. Graff said the Weir vote by her, Hamilton and Gonzales was the impetus for the restructuring plan.“There was no plot with this,” Graff said, before claiming incorrectly that plans had once called for developing the building in Ector County, instead of a portion of Odessa in Midland County. And she again aired suspicions about multiple entities being involved in a commercial real estate deal, which is not uncommon.At another point, Gonzales and Hamilton argued that Odessa does not benefit from the businesses and neighborhoods built in Odessa over the Midland County line.Gonzales asserted, incorrectly, that homes and businesses past the county line do not pay property taxes (later he said in an interview that “not all do,” an apparent reference to tax abatements the council sometimes awards to major projects). He and Hamilton also said that city pays for infrastructure costs such as utilities and roads that developers almost always pay.District 4 Councilman Mike Gardner and District 2 Councilman Dewey Bryant had pushed back on the arguments against supporting development in the portion of Odessa in Midland County, saying the city still collects sales and property taxes, while benefitting from any jobs created by businesses. The councilmen, and Mayor David Turner, had said developers are guided by business decisions and available land.“If we are going to grow Odessa, you can’t make a developer grow it where you want him to grow it,” Gardner told Hamilton at one point.Bryant and Gardner support the proposed council changes.Fellow supporters of the council restructuring argue the change would mean more council members would be accountable to Odessa voters, and that power should not be concentrated in the hands of just five people representing single districts, often with little to no voter input.But an attorney for a group formed to oppose the special election, Odessa Together, had described the proposal as “intentional discrimination in order to disenfranchise Latinos and African Americans in Odessa in order to empower a group that has, even though they are minority in population, they are still a majority of the voting bloc.”The attorney, Domingo Garcia, a former Dallas politician who specializes in personal injury law and was proactive in the political fight to create single-member districts in Dallas in the early 1990s, had also threatened to sue individual organizers of a petition drive.But Gonzales also distanced himself from the threat Tuesday, telling reporters that he would not be a part of any lawsuit. He said he wants to instead keep bringing up the proposed changes at the regular council meetings twice a month.In the instances when council members discussed the proposed restructuring, it was in general. Graff, for example, had argued single-member districts were more effective because “we are different” so representing the smaller area better serves constituents than at-large representation would.She and Gonzales had said the city may need to add more single-member districts but should wait until after the next census in 2020.“If you don’t like what’s going on right now: Well next year, there’s an election,” she said. Landgraf staffer resigns following investigation Facebook Upside Down Blueberry Pie CheesecakeTexas Fried ChickenFruit Salad to Die ForPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay last_img read more

Read More
Borrowed motor, top line take Madden to victory lane

first_imgCorey Madden topped Monday’s second Hobby Stock qualifying feature, on opening night of the IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nationals fueled by Casey’s. (Photo by Tom Macht, www.photofinishphotos.com)BOONE, Iowa (Sept. 3) – A borrowed motor and the top groove took Corey Madden to the win­ner’s circle in Monday’s second IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nationals fueled by Casey’s qualify­ing feature for Hobby Stocks at Boone Speedway.The eighth starting Madden passed John Watson for the lead with six laps left, earning the front spot in the middle row in the Saturday night main event.Lining up behind him will be the rest of the top eight finishers, Watson, Jeff Ware, 2016 champion Andrew Burg, 14th starting Adam Ayers, 13th starting Andrew Claus, 16th starting Drew Barglof and 26th starting Dawson DeBoer.Last year’s runner-up Madden and Watson, the runner-up in 2016, will both make career eighth Super Nationals main event starts.Burg is in the big dance for the seventh time, Barglof the fourth, and Ware the third. Ayers, Claus and DeBoer all are first-time qualifiers.2nd qualifying feature – 1. Corey Madden, Avoca; 2. John Watson, Des Moines; 3. Jeff Ware, Columbus, Neb.; 4. Andrew Burg, Carlisle; 5. Adam Ayers, Adair; 6. Andrew Claus, Spencer; 7. Drew Barglof, Sioux Rapids; 8. Dawson DeBoer, Little Rock; 9. Benji Irvine, Oelwein; 10. Bob Daniels, Des Moines; 11. Justin Wacha, Vinton; 12. Dustin Graham, Boone; 13. Wes Jahnz, St. James, Minn.; 14. Michael Kimm, Vinton; 15. Lenny Tucker, Jefferson, S.D.; 16. Eric Stanton, Carlisle; 17. Trevor Holm, Chandler, Minn.; 18. Zac Smith, Mason City; 19. Dylan Nelson, Adel; 20. Seth Janssen, Ogden; 21. Aaron Shearn, Sioux City; 22. Sal Hernandez, Columbus, Neb.; 23. Austin Jahnz, Lewisville, Minn.; 24. Todd Bass, Des Moines; 25. Nick Foster, Menlo; 26. Colby Kaspar, Columbus, Neb.; 27. David McQuiston, Van Meter; 28. Leonard Loftus, Des Moineslast_img read more

Read More