Purdue Releases 2018 Ag Economic Sector Forecasts

first_img SHARE Previous articleU.S. Soy Losing Ground in Race to Feed LivestockNext articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for December 28, 2017 Hoosier Ag Today The Agricultural Economics Department at Purdue University released a 2018 Ag Outlook Report that contained 12 different articles looking at different aspects of the Ag economy. Just some of the aspects covered include cash rents, farmland values, and the price outlook for corn and soybeans.Professor Craig Dobbins says that reducing input costs has been a priority for farmers since 2013, but cash rents are slower to come down than most. Dobbins says that, “Reductions in cash rents have occurred. The cash rent per bushel of corn in 2013 was $1.43. Purdue’s projected cash rent for 2018 is $1.13 a bushel, down 21 percent over the last four years. Professor Chris Hurt says corn farmers have produced record crops three of the past four years. With ending stocks carrying over, 2017 will have one of the lowest average marketing prices in years.Corn acres are expected to decline next year, meaning a possible return to more profitable prices in the next three years. Dr. Hurt says, even with more soybean acres next year, futures markets are suggesting a 2018 price that is 30 to 40 cents higher than 2017.Source: NAFB News Service By Hoosier Ag Today – Dec 27, 2017 Home Indiana Agriculture News Purdue Releases 2018 Ag Economic Sector Forecasts Purdue Releases 2018 Ag Economic Sector Forecasts SHARE Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Limerick families are ‘crying out for houses’

first_imgPrint Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Linkedin Email Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsLocal NewsLimerick families are ‘crying out for houses’By Alan Jacques – October 30, 2014 516 Advertisement Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” center_img TAGSCllr Séighin Ó CeallaighlimerickLimerick City and County CouncilSinn Fein Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Cllr Seighin O CeallaighLIMERICK city and county Council has been asked to supply councillors in the Metropolitan area with a list of vacant or boarded up houses, and their estimated time of completion.According to City East comhairleoir Séighin Ó Ceallaigh, local people in are crying out for houses, with many families going homeless in the city.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Sinn Fein local representative said that people need to be re-assured there is a plan in place to ensure that houses are provided as soon as possible. The most efficient way of doing this, he believes, is by allocating vacant houses to those on the social housing list.“Houses can remain vacant or boarded up for months throughout the city, and this at a time when there are many people living with relatives or in emergency accommodation. This is an issue of urgent importance and needs to be addressed and resolved immediately,” said Cmhlr Ó Ceallaigh.“Boarding up houses can lead to a much larger renovation cost and an increase in anti-social behaviour in the area. Often items are stolen including pipes and heating systems.“When a house is boarded up, quite often it is broken into ransacked, and the damage then has to be repaired before the house is allocated,” he claimed. Previous articleFormer Andersen plant offers opportunity to RathkealeNext articleUnemployed in Limerick are ‘harassed’ by Government’s dole cut threat Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

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Schenectady still has a bright future

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion I have enjoyed following Schenectady’s revitalization over the last 15 years, thanks to the efforts of countless stakeholders. However, after losing multiple landmarks, I believe we’re missing opportunities to make lasting change while reversing the antiquated message that growth requires a choice between past and future. I’m confident that we have everything we need to implement sustainable building practices, create connected and vibrant neighborhoods citywide, and move toward reducing our reliance on government and outside funding to thrive.I was raised here by hard-working parents who understood the opportunities the city afforded. I’m a proud product of the public school system and community-supported initiatives. My first job was as a newspaper carrier for The Gazette. High grades earned me numerous scholarships, including from local public-benefit organizations. Schenectady got a bad rap back then, and my parents were often heard proudly defending the city, its unique heritage and its untapped potential. These days, I find myself doing that, too, wondering why people fail to realize that urban centers will always share good and bad, and we are no exception.Our local constituents offer invaluable insight into green design alternatives like salvaging demolition materials. Many well-meaning organizations are struggling to remain viable while advocating healthy communities. With a little ingenuity, we can harness the collective power of these groups and make Schenectady a leader in smart growth, sustainable construction and interdependent community. In my graduation speech 21 years ago, I spoke about a bright future and I still believe those words.Caroline (Benedict) BardwellSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationMotorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashSchenectady man dies following Cutler Street dirt bike crashSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%last_img read more

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Improving Coastal Resilience by Studying Dunes

first_imgA team co-led by Associate Professor Christopher Hein of William & Mary’s Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) has won a three-year, $687,850 federal grant to study how natural and constructed dunes respond when impacted by coastal storms and rising seas. According to VIMS, their goal is to provide resource managers with knowledge and tools to help make the U.S. coastline more resilient.The grant is one of six awarded nationwide by NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, with an anticipated total of $4.4 million distributed during the next 3 years. More than 30 organizations will use the funds to study how natural, artificial, and restored coastal habitats could reduce the effects of storms, flooding, and sea-level rise.Hurricanes cost U.S. mainland communities nearly $50 billion in losses in 2018 alone.Joining Hein on the multi-institutional research team are Julie Zinnert of Virginia Commonwealth University and Nicholas Cohn of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, along with a group of ERDC collaborators.“Sand dunes are the first line of defense against storm waves and flooding,” said Hein. “They occur naturally along many coasts, and if degraded or absent, coastal localities build them for protection. Our project will determine the trade-offs between natural and constructed dunes to inform coastal-management decisions.”Hein, Cohn and Zinnert will use a suite of tools to compare and contrast the dynamics of natural and constructed dunes. Their research will focus on the well-studied dunes of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Field Research Facility in Duck, North Carolina, with forays to other dune fields along the Outer Banks of N.C. and Virginia.Their results will be applicable to coastal dune systems worldwide.last_img read more

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