Debate reveals tension about east side growth

first_img Pinterest Church leaders condemn mayor’s disparaging comments Previous articleOdessa to become a TEDx siteNext articleELDER: Instead of ‘Infrastructure Investment,’ How About Killing Davis-Bacon? admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By admin – January 11, 2018 Local NewsGovernment Debate reveals tension about east side growth Landgraf prepares for state budget debate Pinterest Twitter Construction proceeds on the downtown hotel and convention center Wednesday after a heated debate at Tuesday’s city council meeting became a focal point between investor Sondra Eoff and city councilman Malcom Hamilton, which was supposed to be a discussion about the “pros and cons of single-member district representation, at-large representation, and strong mayor representation.” Facebookcenter_img WhatsApp Twitter WhatsApp Home Local News Government Debate reveals tension about east side growth Odessa’s District 5 City Councilman Filiberto Gonzales said his opposition to a proposal to restructure the City Council is really not about civil rights for him. Gonzales also said he does not see the changes as a way of weakening Hispanic voting strength for positions on a board he argues does not make racially polarized decisions.“To me this is about power — this is about power” Gonzales said in an interview after the meeting, adding “I have never used the word racism, discrimination. At the end of the day I want to make sure that we go with facts. I want to go do what’s right for the city of Odessa.”It was a significant acknowledgement that came less than a week after Gonzales lent his support to a group opposing the proposed changes that said the restructuring would illegally discriminate against Odessa minorities by diluting their votes. If voters approved the changes, an attempt to block them from taking effect could hinge on that being true.But Gonzales’ comments also framed the full council’s discussion of the restructuring proposal on Tuesday — a more than 45 minute debate on Odessa development, focusing on the east side of town that opponents of the proposed council restructuring say the changes would favor.The meeting Tuesday at times became contentious, with council members and citizen speakers talking over each other.Three members of the City Council — Gonzales, District 3 Councilwoman Barbara Graff and District 1 Councilman Malcolm Hamilton — combined last month to deny a May election so voters can decide on the restructuring proposal that would add a new council position elected by voters city wide and give the mayor a vote. Graff had argued the changes would be discriminatory, and so did Hamilton, who also said they are “evil” and “racist.”But Gonzales said his concern is not that the at-large positions would disadvantage Hispanics — it’s what he said is a wealth gap in the eastern part of town and other parts of the city, combined with a greater amount of registered voters in east-side District 2.“I don’t see it as a racially motivated agenda for anybody,” Gonzales said.In any case, the denial prompted a petition drive that is underway to force an election.On Tuesday, the entire City Council had been scheduled to discuss “pros and cons of single-member district representation, at-large representation, and strong mayor representation.” But they barely did so.Hamilton at point engaged in a heated back-and-forth with Sondra Eoff, who with her husband is investing about $50 million in the city-supported downtown hotel and conference center, as she tried to make the case for her support of the council restructuring proposal. She was also arguing that east Odessa, where she lives, is part of the city where the City Council should support development.Hamilton questioned her altruism in pursuing the multimillion facility in his district, which city officials sought as a way to kick off a broader redevelopment of the long blighted area.“You are doing it for your own benefit as private business, let’s be clear about that,” Hamilton said.Eoff said called the remark “unbelievable and ungrateful,” said Hamilton had “done nothing to help us in this project.”She said she wanted to help south Odessa, where she used to live. And Eoff, who is Hispanic, said efforts to paint the restructuring proposal as driven by racial prejudice as offensive to her.“To say that everyone in District 2 is rich and powerful and doesn’t care about the rest of Odessa, I take offense to,” Eoff said.Often confusion and inaccuracy reigned, as the City Council revisited a controversial decision in May to deny incentives for an oilfield equipment supplier, Weir Oil and Gas, that eventually abandoned plans to build a $25 million facility in Odessa in favor of Midland. Graff said the Weir vote by her, Hamilton and Gonzales was the impetus for the restructuring plan.“There was no plot with this,” Graff said, before claiming incorrectly that plans had once called for developing the building in Ector County, instead of a portion of Odessa in Midland County. And she again aired suspicions about multiple entities being involved in a commercial real estate deal, which is not uncommon.At another point, Gonzales and Hamilton argued that Odessa does not benefit from the businesses and neighborhoods built in Odessa over the Midland County line.Gonzales asserted, incorrectly, that homes and businesses past the county line do not pay property taxes (later he said in an interview that “not all do,” an apparent reference to tax abatements the council sometimes awards to major projects). He and Hamilton also said that city pays for infrastructure costs such as utilities and roads that developers almost always pay.District 4 Councilman Mike Gardner and District 2 Councilman Dewey Bryant had pushed back on the arguments against supporting development in the portion of Odessa in Midland County, saying the city still collects sales and property taxes, while benefitting from any jobs created by businesses. The councilmen, and Mayor David Turner, had said developers are guided by business decisions and available land.“If we are going to grow Odessa, you can’t make a developer grow it where you want him to grow it,” Gardner told Hamilton at one point.Bryant and Gardner support the proposed council changes.Fellow supporters of the council restructuring argue the change would mean more council members would be accountable to Odessa voters, and that power should not be concentrated in the hands of just five people representing single districts, often with little to no voter input.But an attorney for a group formed to oppose the special election, Odessa Together, had described the proposal as “intentional discrimination in order to disenfranchise Latinos and African Americans in Odessa in order to empower a group that has, even though they are minority in population, they are still a majority of the voting bloc.”The attorney, Domingo Garcia, a former Dallas politician who specializes in personal injury law and was proactive in the political fight to create single-member districts in Dallas in the early 1990s, had also threatened to sue individual organizers of a petition drive.But Gonzales also distanced himself from the threat Tuesday, telling reporters that he would not be a part of any lawsuit. He said he wants to instead keep bringing up the proposed changes at the regular council meetings twice a month.In the instances when council members discussed the proposed restructuring, it was in general. Graff, for example, had argued single-member districts were more effective because “we are different” so representing the smaller area better serves constituents than at-large representation would.She and Gonzales had said the city may need to add more single-member districts but should wait until after the next census in 2020.“If you don’t like what’s going on right now: Well next year, there’s an election,” she said. Landgraf staffer resigns following investigation Facebook Upside Down Blueberry Pie CheesecakeTexas Fried ChickenFruit Salad to Die ForPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay last_img read more

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Besser free family fun day this weekend will encourage S.T.E.A.M learning

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisALPENA, MICH — Anyone interested in history or science and the arts has the perfect opportunity to further explore what Besser Museum has to offer this weekend.The museum is hosting a free family fun day that will allow kids to explore the planetarium and other science, math, and technology related topics. Education coordinator, Amanda Kucharek, says there will be something for the entire family to enjoy.“It’s an open-house activity day. The planetarium is going to be open-door shows. We’re going to be playing Accidental Astronauts, which is a really fun kids’ show. So that’ll be playing all throughout the event. You can stop in and catch a little bit, or stay for the whole show.”There will also be a bounce house and astronaut ice cream while supplies last. You can drop by Besser Museum Saturday between noon and 2 p.m. Once again, the event is free.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis Tags: alpena, Besser, Family Fun Day, Learning, S.T.E.A.MContinue ReadingPrevious Art on the Bay to take place in downtown Alpena this weekendNext Word on the Street: What do you like about Alpena’s Brown Trout Festival?last_img read more

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Human Rights Day 2019: Youth standing up for human rights

first_imgDear Editor,The United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on December 10, 1948, envisioning a world where “all members of the human family” enjoy “freedom, justice, and peace in the world.” These efforts are the responsibility of the state, but no Government can do it on their own. This is a call for youth involvement in the pursuit of human rights. Young people represent the majority of most developing countries’ population, where we are often directly exposed to the effects of climate change, conflict, exclusion or economic instability. Moreover, in many parts of the world, it is still difficult for youth to garner a place in the decision-making processes. In Guyana, young people under the age of 35 make up at least 65 per cent of the population.Despite these challenges, every day, young people stand up for rights and against racism, xenophobia, hate speech, bullying, discrimination and other forms of human rights violations. We also take a lead role in many areas – including advocating for climate action. On Human Rights Day, we recognise the leadership and courageous efforts of “Youth Standing Up for Human Rights” in light of this year’s theme. The aim is to celebrate the potential of youth as productive agents of change, magnify their voices, and involve a comprehensive range of global audiences in the protection and promotion of human rights. The contribution of our youth is invaluable.Youth participation is essential to achieve sustainable development for all. Involvement in public life is an essential principle of human rights. Young people are pursuing involvement in decisions that have a direct and indirect impact on their lives and wellbeing. We need to be heard to inform current decision-making and realise sustainable development for all people.Youth can play a crucial role in positive change. Young people are the key drivers of political, economic and social revolution. We are at the forefront of grassroots mobilisation for positive change and bring modern ideas and solutions for a better world.Empowering youth to better know and claim their rights will generate benefits globally. Regularly, young persons are marginalised because of our age. Safeguarding our human rights and empowering us to better know and claim them will generate benefits at country, regional and global levels.On this Human Rights Day, let us commit as individuals and organisations to doing all that we can to guarantee that young people have safe and inclusive spaces and can contribute in all decisions that have an influence on our wellbeing and our communities’ development.Yours faithfully,Sarah Bovell,Human RightsCoordinator,Guyana’s SocietyAgainst SexualOrientationDiscrimination(SASOD Guyana)Kobe SmithPresident, YouthAdvocacy Movement(YAM), GuyanaResponsibleParenthoodAssociation (GRPA) alast_img read more

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Thunderstorms: a must to avoid

first_imgTalk to professional pilots and aircraft accident investigators and here’s what they’ll tell you about thunderstorms: avoid them. Don’t try to outclimb them in an attempt to overfly bad weather. Don’t attempt to ‘shoot the gap’ between thunderstorm cells. Give convective, tempestuous thunderstorms wide, wide berth. Respect the fact that they can ruin your day.AirlineRatings.com took a look at some of the more notable thunderstorm–related crashes. We excluded wind shear accidents that occurred close to the ground, on takeoff and landing, focusing on encounters during climb or at cruise altitude. Despite the fact specific Probable Causes may differ, a common thread runs through the record: pilots should never come perilously close to, or actually penetrate, thunderstorm cells.   Suggested Read: Freak thunderstorms set to riseThe record: Air France 447It’s tempting to place the June 1, 2009 crash of Air France Flight 447 in this category. But we won’t. Even though the A330’s route over the mid-Atlantic, off the coast of Brazil, put its flight path near a broad band of thunderstorms, the French air accident investigatory agency, the BEA, said the crash was not due weather, but a deep aerodynamic stall. All 228 on board died on the Rio de Janeiro to Paris flight.The accident remains one of the most controversial in history. But it doesn’t exactly fit the classic mold of thunderstorm encounters. Others do.Southern Airways 242The DC-9, on a short hop from Huntsville, Alabama to Atlanta, attempted to shoot the gap ‘twixt two thunderstorm cells April 4, 1977. Approaching a line of storms at 17,000 feet the pilot looks down at his black & white Bendix X-band radar. “Looks heavy,” he says. Nothing’s going through that.” Then, something catches his eye. “See that?” he asks the first officer (co-pilot). “That’s a hole isn’t it?” responds the first officer.“It’s not showing a hole, see it?”Shortly thereafter the first officer asks the captain, “Which way do we go across, or go out? I don’t know how we get through there.”The pilot responds, “I know you’re just going to have to go out and [do it].”“Yeah, right across that band,” answers the first officer.A pair of thunderstorm cells flank the gap that Southern 242 attempts to squeeze through. The one to the north tops out at 46,000 feet; the one to the south forms an anvil-like plateau 5,000 feet higher.As the first officer, who was doing the actual flying, banks to the left he says, “All right, here we go.” In an instant Flight 242 enters a liquid hell with baseball-sized hail crashing against the fuselage.Both Pratt & Whitney JT8-Ds literally suffocate. The compressor blades of the powerplants stall, killing the engines. The DC-9 is suddenly a glider.The crew makes an heroic, but futile, attempt to land on a small rural road. It fails. 72 die, including nine on the ground. Twenty-two originally survive.In its Probable Cause finding the United States National Transportation Safety Board said the crash resulted from “the total and unique loss of thrust from both engines while the aircraft was penetrating an area of severe thunderstorms.” A dissenting NTSB member said the accident was caused by “the captain’s decision to penetrate rather than avoid an are of severe weather.” The dissenting member also blamed the crash on “the reliance upon airborne weather radar for penetration rather than avoidance of the storm system.”Braniff International Airways 352If one captain decided to penetrate a thunderstorm system, nine years earlier another opted, too late as it tuned out, to do a 180-degree turn and try to escape.Flight 352, a four-engine Electra propjet, is making the short hop from Houston to Dallas May 3, 1968, prime thunderstorm season in Texas. While at 20,000 feet the crew asks Air Traffic Control for permission to descend to 15,000 feet and deviate to the west. ATC responds by saying other flights are avoiding the weather by circumnavigating it to the east. The crew responds, “On our [radar] scope here it looks like…a little bit to the west would do us real fine.” Controllers okay a descent to 14,000 feet. Then Flight 352 asks ATC for permission to descend to 5,000 feet, and inquires if there is any hail in the area. Air Traffic Control answers, “No, you’re the closest one that’s ever come close to it yet…I haven’t been able…well I haven’t tried to get anybody to go through it, they’ve all deviated around to the east.”Minutes later Braniff 352 runs into that hail and requests a 180-degree turn. ATC okays the exit. The Electra never makes it out, breaking up in mid-air. 85 dead.The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board’s Probable Cause finding?: “The stressing of the aircraft structure beyond its ultimate strength during an attempted recovery from an unusual attitude induced by turbulence associated with a thunderstorm. The operation in the turbulence resulted from a decision to penetrate an area of known weather.”In the wake of 352, NTSB recommended airlines emphasize weather radar be used to avoid, not penetrate, thunderstorms.It’s a refrain that still rings true today.Northwest Airlines Flight 705 Thunderstorms aren’t unusual over the Everglades of the U.S. state of Florida, even in February. On climbout from Miami International en route to Chicago on February 12, 1963, Northwest Flight 705, a Boeing 720, requests Air traffic controllers allow it to climb to a higher altitude to avoid storms in the area. 705’s crew then tells ATC, “We’re in the clear now. We can see it out ahead…Looks pretty bad.”Controllers clear 705 to climb. ATC and the crew talked about moderate to heavy turbulence. Then, Flight 705 radios controllers, “You better run the rest of [the departing flights] off the other way.”The 720 climbs fast and furious, as much as 9,000 feet per minute. Then, it starts to fall. Somewhere below 10,000 feet the aircraft comes apart. 43 people perish.Investigators found the Probable Cause of the crash to be up and downdrafts, the kind associated with thunderstorms. Those gyrations led to the in-flight breakup of the 720.While thunderstorms per se usually can’t pull an airplane apart, “turbulence [associated with the storms can] cause an aircraft to exceed its structural limits and literally rip of the wings,” said retired Major General Timothy Peppe, Chief of Safety and Commander of the United States Air Force Safety Center in a presentation for the U.S. National Weather Association. This is what happened to Northwest Flight 705.That’s why the experts continue to counsel avoidance. Not penetration, not attempts to overfly or slip between cells.New tools for safer flightsIn an effort to equip pilots with the latest tools to meet the thunderstorm avoidance challenge the U.S. avionics company Rockwell Collins unveiled its new MultiScan ThreatTrack™ weather radar in 2014.Contending it “provides unprecedented atmospheric threat assessment capabilities for transport aircraft,” the system goes beyond predicting hail and lightening within a thunderstorm cell. It actually alerts pilots about treats “adjacent to the cell.” Should the cells be growing ahead and below the aircraft, ThreatTrack Predictive Overflight™ protection alerts pilots if the cells will be in their airplane’s flight path.Then there’s turbulence detection. The system breaks turbulence into two categories: severe and “ride-quality.”When’s the system coming to a carrier you? American Airlines is debuting the new radar on its Next-Generation Boeing 737 fleet. A number of other carriers have opted for the new device for some of their aircraft. Among them are AirAsia, Silk Air, China Eastern, EVA Air, VivaAerobus, Air Algerie and Lion Air.The new radar holds the promise of “helping pilots better navigate disruptive weather threats,” as wells a “smoother flights,” contends Steve Timm, Rockwell Collins vice president and general manager for Air Transport Systems.New detection gear is great, as long as pilots use it to absolutely avoid thunderstorms, not penetrate or skirt them too closely. Good detection tools are never a substitute for good decision-making. If there’s one lesson the accident record teaches unambiguously it’s that.last_img read more

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Japan hails South African space tech successes

first_imgThe infrared survey facility (IRSF) became operational in November 2000, and since then has played a key role in the advancement of our space knowledge.(Image: Tetsuya Nagata, Nagoya University) The Large Magellanic Cloud is a nearby irregular dwarf galaxy that was the subject of the IRSF’s first research mission.(Image: Wikipedia) An aerial view of the site, with the Southern African Large Telescope (Salt) on the left and the IRSF on the far right.(Image: Tetsuya Nagata, Nagoya University) The Salt is the largest such instrument in the entire southern hemisphere.(Image: Flickr)  MEDIA CONTACTS • Anacletta Koloko  Science communication unit, South  African Agency for Science and  Technology Advancement  +27 12 392 9338 RELATED ARTICLES • Eye in the sky benefits society • Space science thriving in SA • SA’s space capabilities set to grow • SKA: who gets whatJanine Erasmus Scientists from Japan, South Africa and other African countries came together in early October at the Space Science Colloquium to share the latest developments in the fields of astronomy, space science and satellite applications. The event was co-hosted by the national Department of Science and Technology, with the Japanese Embassy in South Africa. Dr Takahiro Nagayama of Nagoya University filled attendees in on the infrared survey facility (IRSF), a joint Japan-South Africa project located in Sutherland, Northern Cape province, at an altitude of 1 761 metres. Nagayama is the manager of the facility and has been involved with it since its inception in 1998. The IRSF is situated on the same site as the Southern African Large Telescope (Salt) – the largest optical telescope in the southern hemisphere – and a number of other instruments including the Alan Cousins telescope, the Elizabeth telescope, and the Korean Yonsei telescope. This makes the site one of the best places in the world to conduct advanced astronomy, according to Nagayama. The IRSF is a 1.4m telescope with an infrared (IR) camera. It was developed by scientists at Nagoya, with the help of the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. It’s Japan’s first southern hemisphere IR telescope. The country decided on South Africa as a host for several reasons. “We knew we had to build a telescope in the southern hemisphere, because there are many important celestial objects that are only visible in the southern sky,” explained Nagayama. South Africa was chosen from an initial group of three candidates, with Chile and Australia. It was selected as the best of the three because it had excellent weather as well as an extremely competent astronomical community, and there was no language barrier, as there was in South America. “The South African people are also very friendly and good to work with. South Africa was the best site for us at that time, and I believe it still is now.” Japan entered into the agreement with the SAAO in 1998 and soon afterwards, the project received a grant from the Japanese ministry of science and technology, to the tune of some US$7-million. “The SAAO has provided the infrastructure, including power, water, internet, and the site itself,” said Nagayama. “The local astronomical community built the dome and building.” Nagoya provided the telescope and near-IR camera known as Sirius, which was developed by graduate students. “You won’t find any big names – Sony, Nikon – in this project,” said Nagayama.Surveying our skies Initially, the main function of IRSF was to conduct a thorough study of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds – small irregular galaxies that lie close to the Milky Way – using a tri-wavelength observation technique.The Magellanic Cloud survey was completed in 2007 and then the Indian Department of Space used the telescope to survey the central region of the Milky Way. There are other research projects ongoing. The presence of the IRSF in South Africa has brought the world’s best astronomers to the country and helped to develop its scientific talent. In the 12 years since the telescope came into operation, 142 observers, of whom 81 were Japanese and 61 foreign, have visited from 31 institutes – 13 from Japan, six from South Africa and 12 from other countries including Korea, the UK and US. Also, studies have resulted in 87 refereed papers, 11 of them with South Africans as the first author. Finally, 19 PhDs have been awarded for research carried out at IRSF, to 16 Japanese scholars and three from the University of Cape Town. “We hope the collaboration will continue,” said Nagayama. “The IRSF is so far the most successful science collaboration between South Africa and Japan.”Uncovering the secrets of the universe Nagayama explained the reasons for choosing to work in infrared instead of visible light. “Astronomers are interested in concepts such as the possibility of a second earth beyond our solar system, dark energy, black holes, and the dawn and end of the universe,” he said. “Traditionally we have observed these things with visible light, but today we can use the whole electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma rays to radio.” Probably the most well-known example of this technology, he said, is the Hubble telescope, which has a 2.4m primary mirror and captures images in the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared bands. The Hubble is in a low earth orbit and because it is not subjected to atmospheric turbulence, said Nagayama, its images are sharp. However, when taking images of objects that are very far away, visible light does not produce the best pictures. Interstellar dust results in a phenomenon known as scattering of visible light, and the picture that is finally received is degraded, but this doesn’t affect IR as much. “Also, visible light can’t penetrate the interstellar dust to see into and behind the Milky Way, but IR can,” said Nagayama. “The centre of our galaxy is hidden to visible light, but we can see it clearly in IR because the dust is invisible at these wavelengths.” Sirius can take simultaneous images in three different bands – wavelengths of 1.2µ (micron), 1.6µ and 2.1µ respectively – because of its special mirrors. The optics are cooled by a closed-cycle refrigerator to about 100 kelvin, or -173 degrees Celsius. “We can also create a false-colour composite image by colouring the three bands blue, green and red respectively.”Complementing each other Nagayama described another major Japanese astronomical project, the Subaru telescope, which is an 8.4m single mirror telescope built on the summit of the volcanic Mount Mauna Kea in Hawaii. “Although Subaru has a bigger mirror than Hubble and takes good pictures, Hubble is better because it is in space,” said Nagayama. Other Japanese large projects include the Akari (IR), Suzaku (x-ray) and the Alma radio telescope, while South Africa has the Salt, whose aperture is larger than Subaru, and the KAT-7, MeerKAT and Square Kilometre Array, all of which are projects involving radio telescopes. Altogether, said Nagayama, this means that the Japanese and South African projects have an observation range from gamma or y-ray, through x-ray, UV, visible light, IR, and radio. “These projects complement each other,” he said, “meaning that the coverage between Japan and South Africa is effective across the full spectrum of electromagnetic waves.”last_img read more

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PM Narendra Modi in Kedarnath: 5 things he said about temple shrine in past

first_imgA day after completing the election campaign for the 2019 Lok Sabha election, Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Saturday visited the Kedarnath temple in Garhwal region of Uttarakhand. The temple, which is an integral part of the famous Char Dham Yatra, was opened for devotees earlier this month.During his visit to Kedarnath, Prime Minister paid obeisance at the historic temple. In a tweet he said he also reviewed the development work that is being carried out in Kedarnath, a town that was destroyed in 2013 due to heavy rain and massive floods.ALSO READ | PM Narendra Modi offers prayers at Kedarnath shrine, plans to meditate in cavePM Modi also tweeted some photographs of snow-covered mountains and the lesser Himalayas in Uttarakhand en-route to the temple shrine.However this is not the first time when PM Modi has been Kedarnath.Here are five things he has said about Kedarnath in the past:1) In November 2018, PM Modi revisited Kedarnath temple. Describing his visit he said he feels honoured to be able to visit the temple. In a tweet on his visit, Modi said, “On the banks of the pristine Bhagirathi river, praying to Maa Bhagirathi. Felt extremely blessed.”2) In October 2017, PM Narendra Modi visited Kedarnath temple a day after Diwali. He said, “The Himalayas have so much to offer–for spiritual pursuits, for the nature lover, for those interested in adventure, water sports. I invite everyone to come and explore the Himalayas.” In the same visit, Modi said the government is building “quality infrastructure” in Kedarnath. “It will be modern but the traditional ethos will be preserved.”advertisement3) In his October 2017 visit, PM Modi also said that the blessings from Kedarnath will lead his government to “fulfil the aspirations of every Indian citizen in 2022”.Kedarnath will become a model Teertha Kshetra.’ We are creating proper facilities for pilgrims and ensuring welfare of the priests. pic.twitter.com/F9zYO2SFjmChowkidar Narendra Modi (@narendramodi) October 20, 20174) In May 2017, writing about Kedarnath temple, Modi tweeted, “I can say it confidently, we will not ignore or forget the heritage that we have been historically proud of.”5) A year after the 2013 Kedarnath tragedy, when the doors of the temple were opened for pilgrims, Modi tweeted: “I am very happy that the doors of the holy Kedarnath temple have once again opened for pilgrims. My best wishes to the pilgrims!”ALSO READ | Majestic mountains! PM Modi shares photos on his way to KedarnathALSO READ | Why Kedarnath temple in Uttarakhand is famousALSO WATCH | PM Modi offers prayers at Kedarnath templelast_img read more

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