ROTC units host vigil to honor veterans

first_imgChris Collins | The Observer In observance of Veteran’s Day, the Notre Dame ROTC units stood vigil for 24 hours at the Clarke Memorial Fountain, known popularly as “Stonehenge,” to honor the men and women who have served.The celebration of Veteran’s Day began at 5 p.m. on Nov. 10, when a 24-hour vigil at the Clarke Memorial Fountain, known by students as “Stonehenge,” began. According to a University press release, cadets and midshipmen from all three ROTC units stood guard at the four corners of the fountain during the vigil. This 24-hour vigil is a traditional event that Notre Dame ROTC units hold each year, according to the release.The vigil concluded with a ceremony on the quad on Nov. 11, exactly 24-hours after the guarding of the memorial began. Cadets and midshipmen filled the quad, standing in rank to show respect for all the living and deceased men and women who served before them.The ceremony began with the introduction of the official party, which included Fr. Pete McCormick, director of Campus Ministry; James Wagenbach, former U.S. solider and Vietnam veteran; Lt. Col. Christopher Pratt, commanding officer of Notre Dame Army ROTC and professor of military science; Cmrd. Frederick Landau, executive officer of Notre Dame Naval ROTC and professor of naval science; and Col. Frank Rossi, commanding officer of Notre Dame Air Force ROTC and professor of aerospace studies.The introduction was followed by a playing of the national anthem, a prayer led by McCormick and a brief history of Veteran’s Day.“By guarding the memorial, we are showing reverence and respect for the veterans and the fallen heroes,” Cadet Maj. Robert Szabo said. “We are remembering what those men did in those wars.”All cadets and midshipman who guarded the memorial were honored during the ceremony.“The 24-hour vigil they just completed is not only a tribute to veterans, but a testament to [the cadets’ and midshipmen’s] commitment, strength and character,” Col. Pratt said in a speech during the ceremony. “Although most have yet to serve, they represent the best and the brightest of our country. They chose a path of service to this great nation that less than one half of 1 percent choose these days.”Pratt then introduced Wagenbach, the keynote speaker. In his introduction, Pratt noted that Wagenbach was both a Notre Dame alum and veteran. According to Pratt, Wagenbach served as a recon platoon leader and armored cavalry troop commander in Vietnam. He was medically discharged for wounds received in combat and decorated with a Silver Star Medal, the third highest military decoration for valor, awarded for gallantry and action against the enemy.Wagenbach spoke about a Notre Dame very different than the one students know today. In his speech, Wagenbach said during his time at Notre Dame in the 1960s, there were 6,000 total undergraduate students, 4,000 of which participated in ROTC.“James Wagenbach is both an American treasure and hero, and we are honored to have him with us,” Pratt said.The ceremony concluded as veterans in attendance were asked to stand and be recognized. Finally, taps was played to honor those veterans who passed.“To honor the men and women who have served is of the utmost importance,” Szabo said. “Holding a 24-hour vigil for Veteran’s Day, culminating in the ceremony on the quad, is a great way to show the importance of Veteran’s Day on campus.”Tags: Air Force ROTC, Army ROTC, Clarke Memorial Fountain, Naval ROTC, ROTC, Veterans Day God. Country. Notre Dame.On Nov. 11, this traditional Notre Dame motto took on an even deeper significance as Veteran’s Day was observed on North Quad by Notre Dame’s Army, Navy and Air Force ROTC units.last_img read more

Read More
LGPS Central raises £700m for emerging markets fund

first_imgLGPS Central, the pooling vehicle for nine local authority pension funds in central England, has raised £700m (€781.7m) from four of its partner funds for an emerging market equities mandate, according to council documents.BMO Global Asset Management, UBS Asset Management and Vontobel Asset Management were named to the mandate in January. According to a statement from LGPS Central yesterday, they have been handed a third each of the Emerging Markets Equity Active Multi-Manager fund.LGPS Central declined to disclose the size of the fund at its launch on 19 July, but according to meeting minutes from Leicestershire Council’s pension fund committee from 5 July, four funds committed to invest at launch with approximately £700m between them.Leicestershire’s £4.1bn pension fund and Worcestershire’s £2.8bn scheme both planned to transition assets into the fund, according to council documents seen by IPE. Colin Pratt, investment director and manager of managers at LGPS Central, said: “A lot of hard work has gone into making sure this fund will serve the needs of our partner funds, and we truly believe it will meet their long-term objectives.” Source: WikipediaLeicester, UKThe launch is the fourth from LGPS Central this year, following the February opening of a private equity platform targeting £2bn over the next few years. In March it named Fidelity and Neuberger Berman to a corporate bond mandate, and five managers to a global sustainable equity mandate. The pooling company already oversees roughly £20bn of its partner funds’ £45bn in combined assets through pooled funds and advice mandates.LGPS Central was set up to pool the assets of nine Midlands-based local government pension schemes, including Cheshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Worcestershire, West Midlands Pension Fund and the West Midlands Integrated Transport Authority.last_img read more

Read More
No. 4 USC hosts first home game against No. 5 UCSB

first_imgAfter opening conference play with a 21-5 win over Pepperdine, the No. 4 USC men’s water polo team will try to spark some home cooking Saturday as it clashes with No. 5 UC Santa Barbara in its first game at Uytengsu Aquatics Center this season.With their rout over the Waves last week, the 11-2 Trojans began Mountain Pacific Sports Federation competition on the right foot and rebounded from the Kap7 NorCal Classic, where the team suffered its first two losses of the season at the hands of No. 2 UCLA and No. 4 Cal.Now, the youthful Trojan squad will try to build a winning streak in the early stages of conference play before getting another crack at the rival Bruins and Golden Bears later this month.Making up one of the youngest Trojan squads in recent memory, the team’s freshmen have quickly adjusted to the collegiate level of play and to the gameplan of 12-time National Coach of the Year Jovan Vavic.Nearing the midway point of the season, freshman goalies McQuin Baron and Ben Goncharenko have combined for a total 114 saves, while freshmen drivers Matteo Morelli and Grant Stein have tallied 28 and 26 goals so far respectively — only senior driver and captain Kostas Genidounias has netted more shots with a team-high 41 goals on the year. Genidounias believes his first-year teammates have found their niche so far.“It’s very encouraging and really important for our freshmen to step up,” Genidounias said. “Players like [freshman utility man] James Walters, Grant Stein, Mateo Morelli and [freshman utility man] Mihajlo Milevic — it’s really encouraging to see them play and score and do well on defense because they’ve been here for a month or two and they’re playing like that — wait until you see them in a couple of months or in a couple years.”These freshmen will be key in pulling off a win over the 8-2 Gauchos. One of UCSB’s two losses came at the hands of USC on the first day of the NorCal Classic last month. The other came to Cal.The Trojans will, on the defensive end, look to limit Gaucho driver Eric Van de Mortel, who leads the team in scoring with 16 goals this season, and on the offensive end, continue spreading the ball around — 10 different Trojans scored in the team’s victory over Pepperdine, and Vavic has emphasized such ball movement as a key part of the Trojan offense.“That has been our trademark for the last few years,” Vavic said. “We really want more people to be involved and play freely. This is nothing new for us — if you look back at the last 10 years, we’ve always had more people involved. We’re just continuing to build the same way, and we always encouraged players to be aggressive, and it’s been great.”last_img read more

Read More
A Sapo County: What is the Point?

first_imgYesterday’s lead headline sounded a disturbing alarm concerning tensions brewing in our nation’s South Eastern region. Two prominent members of the Sapo tribe, a subset of the Kru, voiced the alleged desire of their tribesmen to form their own county. Their rationale: greater self-determination through freedom from the allegedly domineering Kru majority. Speaking jointly, Mr. Romeo Quioh, Superintendent of Sinoe County, and Mr. Mobutu Nyenpan, former Sinoe Senator, pointed to fears among Sapos that the Krus would reclaim a key Senate seat currently occupied by a Sapo, in 2017. The solution: the establishment of a Sapo county, to maintain the tribe’s direct representation in the Legislature. But is the ‘representation’ of Sapos really the point of this proposition? Our nation was founded by black people determined to be free from oppression, underrepresentation, and economic distress. But, then, our forefathers turned right around, excluding and subjugating the indigenous peoples from the promise of freedom that Liberia offered. The result: nearly two decades of conflict. The same people, who kept the country to themselves for so long, ended up losing it and running right back to America, begging for green cards. And all because they saw our economy as a rigid, crusted pastry, instead of an expanding pie that grows exponentially when everyone gets a piece. But, is that really the scenario at play between the Sapos and the Krus? We think not! In our view, the Sapos and Krus need no separate representation because their needs and desires are the same. Every Liberian has a right to representation in government – on the basis of citizenship, geographical placement, and county population size. Not tribal affiliation. Because we cannot all participate in day-to-day governance, we elect officials to stand in our place, set the agenda and appropriate public monies according our priorities. That is where voting comes in – rule by the majority – because a nation where everyone always gets what they want, simply does not exist. Anywhere. So (ideally) we celebrate our wins, accept our losses, and try to work with those in office to implement our development agenda. And what is that agenda? For most Liberians, they are five simple words: agriculture, education, health, energy (God help LEC!), and roads. Simple. Pray tell, is that any different for the Sapos? Are their priorities really that different from ours? Space travel, perhaps? No. The truth is that this great and beloved tribe is just being manipulated by two power hungry politicians!Of course, this is no new tactic. Politicians, the world over, who lack the moral fiber to earn public confidence and votes, instead use fear, xenophobia, racism, sexism and religious prejudice to garner support for their ambition. Therefore, the proposition of a Sapo county must be given no credence. Or else, such action would set a dangerous precedent, allowing Nimba – where similar issues exist between the Gios and Manos – to follow suit. And what about Montserrado? Should it be reserved for the settlers only? And what of the half of Liberia’s population that resides here? If we allow this mad proposition, we would then have to double the number of counties, allocate the majority of our land to the most populous tribes, and then leave a small village to the smaller ones – which would incite them to anger. This would tear our nation right back into shreds – this time literally as well as figuratively. The thing to remember is that the Sapos and the Krus are one family, with one present and one future. And the solution for them is not separation, but unity around a real leader and a realistic agenda. Whether they elect a Kpelleh or a Mandingo representative is immaterial. What really matters is that their candidate actually works in the best interest of Sinoe, bringing human and infrastructural development (not destruction) to that impoverished county.Meanwhile, we would encourage Mr. Quioh, who is in the employ of the Executive Branch, to exercise some professionalism and at least participate more quietly in county politics. You were hired to supervise development in your county, and to manage the just ended Independence festivities. You failed at that, and must be held accountable. To Mr. Nyenpan: admit that you have failed both the Kru and the Sapos who elected you. You both need to rebuild your credibility through service, not manipulation. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More
Drake Men’s Basketball Signs 7-Footer From Davenport

first_imgRobbins graduated from Davenport Assumption High School in 2017 and has spent the past season at Sunrise Christian Academy in Wichita, Kan. Print Friendly Version “Liam is going to be a great addition to our basketball program,” DeVries said. “He is 7-feet tall and has an incredible skill set for someone his size to go along with his big frame. Liam has a very bright future in our program and we can’t wait to start working with him.” DES MOINES, Iowa – Liam Robbins, a 7-foot tall talent from Davenport, Iowa, will join the Drake University men’s basketball program next season, head coach Darian DeVries announced Tuesday, April 17.last_img read more

Read More