Gardaí appeal for witnesses following fatal traffic collision in Co. Limerick

first_imgLinkedin LimerickNewsGardaí appeal for witnesses following fatal traffic collision in Co. LimerickBy Staff Reporter – June 13, 2018 1422 Facebook Print Advertisement Emailcenter_img WhatsApp Previous articleLimerick’s bicycle doctors head for the hospitalsNext articlePetite Mayhem joins jazz ensemble for Shannon Rowing Club Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Gardaí in Bruff are appealing for witnesses following a fatal traffic collision on the N24 in Co. Limerick.Shortly before 11 am Gardaí and emergency services were called to the scene of a collision involving a car and a lorry on the N24 Limerick to Tipperary road.The collision occurred on a straight stretch of road at Gortnadromin near the village of Dromkeen.The occupants of the car; a man in his 80s and woman 70s, were both pronounced dead at the scene a short time later. The driver of the lorry (male 40s) was taken by Ambulance to University Hospital Limerick (his condition is not thought to be life-threatening).Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The crash site remains closed to traffic and local diversions are in place. Garda Forensic Collision Investigators and local Divisional scene of crime officers are examining the scene.The local Coroner has been notified and arrangements are being made for the bodies to be removed to the mortuary at University Hospital Limerick where post-mortem examinations will be carried out.Anyone with information is asked to contact Gardaí in Bruff 061-382940 or the Garda Confidential Line 1800 666 111. Twitterlast_img read more

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Dino-Feather Story Gets Fluffier

first_imgXing Xu is at it again, claiming that dinosaur feathers are found everywhere – in China, at least, where the bulk of “feathered dinosaur” claims keep turning up in farmyards.  The latest claim is that “Feather structures in maturing dinosaurs changed as they grew.”  This story is accompanied by artwork showing the critters looking as big and fierce as dinosaur monsters (see PhysOrg and National Geographic); in reality, though, they would have been as small as pigeons.    Xu’s paper in Nature concerns two specimens of Similicaudipteryx, which is, obviously, similar to Caudipteryx.  Yet Caudipteryx has long been considered by some as not a dinosaur but a member of the class Aves (birds) that became secondarily flightless (see 12/27/2000, 01/25/2008, 01/21/2009).  Since none of the critics of dinosaur-to-bird evolution were allowed to rebut the claims of the paper in Nature, it is hard to have confidence this fossil has anything to say about a transition from dinosaurs to birds.    Xu claims that the plumage patterns seen in these few fossils “suggests that early feathers were developmentally more diverse than modern ones” and have no counterparts in modern birds.  This is assuming that his team has correctly identified the fossils of extinct animals as members of the same species and can know their ages within acceptable margins of error without having living examples to observe.  Even if that is true, the results do not provide any simple story for the evolution of feathers.  Instead, it appears that modern birds’ moulting habits are simpler now than they were in the past.1.  Xing Xu, Xiaoting Zheng, Hailu You, Exceptional dinosaur fossils show ontogenetic development of early feathers,” Nature 464, 1338-1341 (29 April 2010) | doi:10.1038/nature08965.The supplemental materials in Xu’s paper include a phylogenetic tree showing all the dinosaur groups that supposedly have feathers, and the feather types that have been found.  At first glance it looks impressive, but a closer look raises questions.  He has tyrannosaurids mixed in with the oviraptors and velociraptors and all these other animals.  The cladogram supposedly shows ancestral relationships, with feather types at the tips of each group.  You look at the feather types, though, and the clear bird feathers (pennate feathers with quills and barbs and barbules, and asymmetric flight feathers) have question marks by half the groups.  You read the caption and find his disclaimer that the evidence is questionable for these.  The ones that have the bird-like feathers could be said to be extinct bird lineages or secondarily flightless birds. circular reasoning.    Xu tries to answer the argument that some of the feather-like structures might have been flayed collagen, but we need to see the counter-arguments from Feduccia and the guys at University of Oregon (02/09/2010).  Nature, Science and National Geographic are giving way too much press to one side, to the Mr. Feathered Dinosaur guy Xing Xu.  This is not good science.  The whole story is not being heard.(Visited 35 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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South African chilli sauce bites the world

first_imgThere’s nothing like a spicy and aromatic hot chilli sauce to add some kick to a bland meal. But the Bandito’s chilli sauce is more than just a meal saver; in many instances it creates the meal itself.The distinctive flavour of Bandito’s sauces come from their unique ingredients. Both the Bandito’s and Mama Africa’s range are made of 100% natural ingredients. (Image: Bandito’s Facebook)Brand South Africa ReporterThere’s nothing like a spicy and aromatic hot chilli sauce to add some kick to a bland meal. But the Bandito’s chilli sauce is more than just a meal saver; it many instances it creates the meal itself.In 1994,when the husband and wife team Kian and Doris McRae made the first chilli on the balcony of a flat in the bohemian inner-city suburb of Yeoville, Johannesburg, they had no idea that it would become a global business.Using a recipe for chakalaka, a traditional Zulu chilli sauce, and two big pots borrowed from their neighbours, they began to create what has become an award-winning product.Working as a waiter in a Mexican restaurant to supplement his teacher’s salary, Kian started to take home empty tequila bottles in which they could sell their hot sauce.“Flea markets are a great testing ground for new products,” he says. “We sold our products at the Rosebank flea market, as well as the Petticoat Lane flea market in Fourways.”Soon the weekend flea-market sales exceeded his salary, and Kian abandoned teaching to go into the chilli business full time.Operating from Kew in the north of Johannesburg, the Bandito’s crew have now also launched the Mama Africa’s range of chilli products, which are also widely available where Bandito’s sauces are sold.A special recipeThe distinctive flavour of Bandito’s sauces come from their unique ingredients. Both the Bandito’s and Mama Africa’s range are made of 100% natural ingredients. All the products are preservative-free, have no contains no artificial colourings or flavouring and all the chillis used are home grown in South Africa.The range includes three chilli-vegetable relishes, six hot sauces, two varieties of Jabula cooking sauce, pickled jalapeno peppers and mild salsa, and continues to grow.The company has grown its chilli brand, experimenting over the years with different ingredients. “We use a combination of a variety of chillis, herbs and spices,” says Kian. “We are as natural as possible in the ingredients we use. People have the perceptions that chilli is just chilli, but really it’s not.”In a bid to create more interesting chilli sauces, the Bandito’s Chilli Co have started blending unusual ingredients such as kiwi fruit, apricots, mint and rosemary into their sauces.Because the buying public have a diverse tolerance for chilli, the products vary from mild to fiery hot, with an emphasis on flavour and quality.Setting the world on fireThe Bandito’s range has received international recognition, already winning a number of significant awards including those for best range overall and best new product at the 1999 Sydney Fiery Food show. Also in 1999, the company won the best new product and best habanero sauce awards in Brisbane.The range has done equally well in South Africa, winning the 2002 best product range overall, best product and hottest sauce categories at the South Africa Fiery Food Challenge.Overseas, Bandito’s is sold under the Mama Africa brand name. “There are so many chilli sauce products on the overseas market that we just felt it would give us an edge to market an African product,” says Doris, who runs the export side of the business. “For this reason we created the Mama Africa brand.”The Bandito’s duo have travelled the world, taking their products to global food festivals. Doris attributes much of their international success to their strong relationship with South Africa’s Department of Trade and Industry (DTI).“The DTI has been fantastic. If you have all your ducks in a row and your company is registered, you have all your paperwork in place and you have a good product, they definitely do give you the assistance to market your product overseas.”Doris says the government’s role in taking their product to the world has been invaluable. “We have them to thank for where have come so far,” she says. “A small company like ours could have never afforded to have gone to hall those places.”Over the years, the Bandito’s chilli products have been featured at the Sial International Food Show in Paris, the Anuga Food Show in Cologne, the Fancy Food Show in New York and the Food and Hotel Show in Singapore.As a result of this exposure, they have built up strong business relationships in a number of countries.Their exports started with a small venture into Australia in 1998, which has grown nicely. But their biggest international success is in Russia, where Moscow-based PBK Importers distribute their products across the vast country.In Holland, the sauces are handled by importers Oil and Vinegar. On a smaller scale, Mama Africa’s chilli sauce is available in New Zealand, Canada, the US, Japan, Malaysia, Poland, Sweden, the UK, France, Germany and Austria.Kian notes that the chilli sauce culture is also growing in South Africa. He says most consumers don’t really know how use chilli, so Bandito’s have posted creative recipes on their website for consumers to use. South Africans, he says, are starting to experiment more with their cooking, with the increasing influence of other cultures around the world, making the country’s cooking tastes more varied and creative.This has been good news for Bandito’s products, as they can be used in several different ways – as a cook-in sauce or as a simple accompaniment to a meal. Kian says the company might even consider one day opening up a Bandito’s restaurant, if the right franchise partner came along. It would be a fusion-type eatery with a Mexican theme infused with a South African influence. Hmm, yummy …Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Consistently Consistent

first_imgWhatever your business strategy, it should be pursued consistently.If you have the lowest price because that is the value you intend to create, that should be how you compete. You confuse your customers and your employees when you sometimes try to capture more value. You don’t expect to pay more sometimes, and other times, pay less.If your strategy is to have the very best product, releasing and selling an inferior one damages your strategy. By releasing something that isn’t up to the standard you set, you lose the loyalty and the willingness to pay for something that is supposed to be of a higher quality, one worthy of a higher price.If your strategy is the best total solution, you don’t have to have the best price or the best product. Instead, you have to consistently deliver greater value through a combination of things designed to deliver greater value than competitive offerings. To execute this strategy you need to consistently create new solutions that match your client’s needs. When you stop collaborating and caring enough to do this work, you have broken your strategy.There are companies in every vertical that compete using each of these three strategies. It’s their consistency, however, that defines them in their space. You have to be consistently consistent in the execution of your strategy when it comes to differentiation, and when it comes to pricing.If you choose to compete by providing the lowest price and eliminating other value you might create, execute that strategy consistently and roll up all the targets who need that value. If you choose to create the best product money can buy, then refine your work and improve it, leaving no doubt that your product is better than any alternative. If you compete on the best overall solution, consistently execute that strategy, which means that you price according to the value you create, not what your competitor’s charge. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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