Limerick families are ‘crying out for houses’

first_imgPrint Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Linkedin Email Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsLocal NewsLimerick families are ‘crying out for houses’By Alan Jacques – October 30, 2014 516 Advertisement Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” center_img TAGSCllr Séighin Ó CeallaighlimerickLimerick City and County CouncilSinn Fein Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Cllr Seighin O CeallaighLIMERICK city and county Council has been asked to supply councillors in the Metropolitan area with a list of vacant or boarded up houses, and their estimated time of completion.According to City East comhairleoir Séighin Ó Ceallaigh, local people in are crying out for houses, with many families going homeless in the city.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Sinn Fein local representative said that people need to be re-assured there is a plan in place to ensure that houses are provided as soon as possible. The most efficient way of doing this, he believes, is by allocating vacant houses to those on the social housing list.“Houses can remain vacant or boarded up for months throughout the city, and this at a time when there are many people living with relatives or in emergency accommodation. This is an issue of urgent importance and needs to be addressed and resolved immediately,” said Cmhlr Ó Ceallaigh.“Boarding up houses can lead to a much larger renovation cost and an increase in anti-social behaviour in the area. Often items are stolen including pipes and heating systems.“When a house is boarded up, quite often it is broken into ransacked, and the damage then has to be repaired before the house is allocated,” he claimed. Previous articleFormer Andersen plant offers opportunity to RathkealeNext articleUnemployed in Limerick are ‘harassed’ by Government’s dole cut threat Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

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Tundra environments in the Neogene Sirius Group, Antarctica: evidence from the geological record and coupled atmosphere–vegetation models

first_imgThe Neogene Meyer Desert Formation, Sirius Group, at Oliver Bluffs in the Transantarctic Mountains, contains a sequence of glacial deposits formed under a wet-based glacial regime. Within this sequence fluvial deposits have yielded fossil plants that, along with evidence from fossil insects, invertebrates and palaeosols, indicate the existence of tundra conditions at 85°S during the Neogene. Mean annual temperatures of c. –12 °C are estimated, with short summer seasons with temperatures up to +5 °C. The current published date for this formation is Pliocene, although this is hotly debated. Reconstructions produced by the TRIFFID and BIOME 4 vegetation models, utilizing a Pliocene climatology derived from the HadAM3 General Circulation Model (running with prescribed boundary conditions from the US Geological Survey PRISM2 dataset), also predict tundra-type vegetation in Antarctica. The consistency of the model outputs with geological evidence demonstrates that a Pliocene age for the Meyer Desert Formation is consistent with proxy environmental reconstructions and numerical model reconstructions for the mid-Pliocene. If so, the East Antarctic Ice Sheet has behaved in a dynamic manner in the recent geological past.last_img read more

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PGGM ups stake in joint venture with construction company BAM

first_imgDutch pension giant PGGM has increased its stake in its joint venture with construction company BAM and the partners have started discussions about increasing their joint investments in infrastructure.PGGM paid €39m to BAM for upping its stake by 10 percentage points to 90% in the joint venture. It is looking to commit an additional undisclosed amount to increase its investments in infrastructure projects.Almost all of the €620m the €252bn pension investor committed in 2011 has now been invested. The two partners said they still see “plenty of opportunities” in infrastructure investments despite the coronavirus crisis.Through the partnership with BAM, PGGM invests in public-private partnerships in 23 infrastructure projects in the Netherlands, the UK, Ireland, Belgium, Switzerland and Germany, ranging from the building of the Dutch High Court in The Hague to the Silvertown tunnel in London. The impact of the coronavirus crisis on these projects had so far been negligible, said Natasha Mol, investment manager at PGGM.“This is because we get a fixed fee from the governments involved in the project,” she said. “So far governments have proved to be reliable creditors.”She added that the valuation of the infrastructure projects had also remained stable, resulting in positive returns in the second quarter of the year.Although BAM suffered a net loss of €235m in the first half of 2020 as it has been hit hard by the coronavirus crisis, PGGM insists it did not increase its stake in the joint venture with the construction company with the goal of helping BAM weather the crisis.“This is a conscious choice to increase our investments in this type of assets,” said Mol. “The long-term horizon and stable returns fit well with the demands of our client [healthcare pension fund] PFZW.”In another recent transaction, APG’s decision to increase its stake in Via Outlets was partly motivated by a desire to help out its other shareholder, UK real estate company Hammerson.“On the contrary, I don’t rule out that governments will increase investments because of the crisis”Natasha Mol, investment manager at PGGMThough the coronavirus crisis has put a strain on government finances, Mol believes it will not negatively impact the ability of governments to finance infrastructure projects in the future.“I haven’t received any signals of this kind,” she said. “On the contrary, I don’t rule out that governments will increase investments because of the crisis, for example in healthcare and education. And this may happen more often via public-private partnerships.”PGGM also invests in schools and hospitals through its infrastructure fund.In addition to roads and buildings, PGGM also invests in renewable energy assets within its infrastructure portfolio, which totals €8.9bn. It achieved a return on its infrastructure investments of -3.1% in the first half of this year, compared to a return of +7% in 2019.To read the digital edition of IPE’s latest magazine click here.last_img read more

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Maritime colleges fight for bragging rights in budding rivalry

first_imgIn the first game of his collegiate career, State University of New York Maritime’s Stephen Roman played Massachusetts Maritime in a game billed as the Chowder Bowl.Though it was the first meeting between the schools, it has since taken on greater historical importance.“It felt like it became an instant rivalry,” Roman said.The intensity of the matchup between the Massachusetts Maritime Buccaneers and SUNY Maritime Privateers is primarily fueled by the players’ career choices. Both colleges prepare their students for careers in the nautical industry. The players know they open the season each year against peers they will compete against for employment, as well as on-field supremacy. Alumni from both schools trade barbs on the game throughout the year.That banter has been one-sided, though. SUNY Maritime owns a 4-0 record in the series. Last season was the first since the series began that the two schools did not face off. The cruise schedule of Massachusetts Maritime’s training ship led to the game’s cancellation.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textOn Friday at 7 p.m., the rivalry resumes as SUNY’s cadets and a few thousand local fans will give Massachusetts Maritime a hostile welcome in Throgg’s Neck, N.Y.“I think it’s kind of a respect thing when you’re out actually in the industry after you’re through college and you look back … and know that you were the best football team,” former SUNY Maritime defensive end Thomas Boney said. “It’s kind of just being respected, being able to give them crap.”Massachusetts head coach Jeremy Cameron and SUNY head coach Clayton Kendrick-Holmes call their respective schools the destination for in-state recruits pursuing maritime careers.Yet in coastal states like New Jersey and Florida, Cameron and Kendrick-Holmes often find themselves trying to lure the same players to their academies. Inevitably, one coach misses out on a prospect. Those players take the field against the once-potential teammates they spurned.The recruiting crossfire only intensifies the rivalry.“I actually enjoyed playing at Massachusetts Maritime because I got recruited by them and actually wanted to beat them more,” Boney said.A.J. Gillan played linebacker and captained SUNY Maritime his junior year. But in high school, Massachusetts Maritime heavily recruited him, too. Then, the Privateers forgot him, Roman said.Beating his Chowder Bowl rivals became an obsession.Though only the 2009 Chowder Bowl was decided by more than 10 points, Massachusetts Maritime failed to stop New York in the three closer contests. While that dominance is a point of pride for the Privateers, it haunts the Buccaneers.Since spring practice, Massachusetts harped on its 0-4 record against its rival, defensive captain Nick Mazurkiewicz said. He also predicted an end to SUNY’s rushing dominance, a historic advantage.“We have a bunch of returning starters. My buddies on the line are doing excellent at practice, the linebackers are doing awesome, the D-backs are unbelievable so we have a bunch of experience coming back on D,” he said. “I think we can shut them down.”Regardless of the result, the game will ripple into the maritime workplace. Players from both sides of the rivalry said they are constantly reminded of the game’s importance by alumni.“My cousin graduated when I was a freshman and he was a senior captain, and I think he would be thrilled,” Mazurkiewicz said. “He’s always following me around, and I talked to a bunch of the guys from last season and the year before that, and they’re always pushing us to win because we’re a big family out there, you know, even when we’re not with each other.”On the field, some mild trash talk is exchanged.Some players consider Massachusetts a better educational institution with New York wearing the label of a less serious school, senior captain Eric Heedles said.Ultimately, SUNY prefers to point to its 4-0 record.Yet an underlying respect for each other’s career choices prevents any deep-seeded animosity.“We have the utmost respect for New York Maritime and in particular coach Holmes, obviously, with his service in the military,” Cameron said. “He’s a total class guy and he’s a great guy. So, you know we have a lot of respect for him and his program.”Holmes is a 1992 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy who performed active duty as recently as 2011 in Kandahar, Afghanistan. The respectfully intense Chowder Bowl is like a small-scale version of the Army-Navy game, he said.“I think our industry, the fact that it’s a smaller community that you actually work together from day one, I think it kind of heightens the — it’s an intense rivalry,” Cameron said. “I wouldn’t call it friendly at all.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 4, 2012 at 1:07 am Contact Jacob: [email protected] | @Jacob_Klinger_last_img read more

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