Schroders: World still heading for 4.1°C rise as climate finance slows

first_imgThe world remains on course for a 4.1°C temperature rise as developments in the oil and gas industry have been offset by a slowdown in low-carbon investments, according to Schroders.Capital investment in the oil and gas industry fell sharply in the last quarter of 2017, the period covered by the asset manager’s update to its climate change tracking analysis. “The oil and gas industry could be starting to translate the growing pressure it is facing into a strategic response,” said Andrew Howard, head of sustainable research at Schroders.“There is further to go but the change is encouraging. Time will tell whether [capital] discipline holds with rising prices.” The asset manager considered that the changes in the oil and gas industry would translate into a projected temperature rise of 3.9°C, down from 5.3°C.However, a marked fall in investment in clean energy technologies offset this effect, according to Schroders.It cited data from Bloomberg New Energy Finance showing that, in late 2017, clean energy investment had fallen to 2010 levels. In October 2017 the Climate Policy Initiative (CPI) released analysis showing a 12% drop in global investment levels for 2016.Howard said: “The challenge of encouraging capital into climate solutions on the necessary scale has attracted a lot of attention from policymakers and environmental groups and, while plans are typically ambitious, tangible action remains more elusive.”Schroders’ ‘Climate Progress Dashboard’ primarily uses data from CPI, a not-for-profit think tank.Keeping the global temperature rise to a maximum of 2°C over pre-industrial levels is the target that governments from around the world set as part of the 2015 Paris Agreement. It is widely agreed by scientists to be the threshold beyond which climate change risks become unacceptable or the impacts too damaging. The text of the Paris Agreement itself refers to keeping temperature increases to a maximum of 2°C and ideally 1.5°C because “this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change”.Schroders’ previous analysis, which was based on various indicators as at the third quarter of last year, also pointed to a 4.1°C temperature increase.In a recent report consultancy firm McKinsey said CO2 emissions would plateau by 2030 and “remain far from a 2°C pathway”.BP’s recent energy outlook outlined the ‘most likely’ trajectory for global energy markets over the next 20 years which, like Schroders’ analysis, was based on various assumptions and judgements.last_img read more

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Quarantine over China plague death

first_img 41 Views   no discussions HealthLifestyle Quarantine over China plague death by: – July 23, 2014 Tweet Sharing is caring! Sharecenter_img Share Share Plague affects wild rodents and is then spread by fleasPart of a city in north-west China has been sealed off and dozens of people placed in quarantine after a man died of bubonic plague, state media say.The man died in Yumen city, Gansu province, on 16 July.A total of 151 people have been placed under observation, Xinhua news agency says. Authorities have isolated a part of the city centre and three sections of Chijin town which is an hour away.The man was believed to have caught the infection after contact with a marmot.Marmots are large, squirrel-type rodents that live in mountainous areas.The victim is reported to be a 38-year-old man who had fed a dead marmot to his dog.The deputy head of the hospital where the man died told reporters that the victim had arrived with an increased heart-rate and seemed to be slipping into shock. The hospital has since been quarantined.It is not clear from reports how big the four quarantine zones are. Ten checkpoints have been set up around Yumen and Chijin.Those in quarantine all had contact with the man, Xinhua said. None was showing signs of infection, it said.Officials have told reporters that the group could be released after nine days of quarantine if no further cases of plague appeared among them.Yumen is a small city in western Gansu province, which borders Xinjiang. The last reported case of bubonic plague in the city was in 1977, Xinhua said.Gansu has seen at least five cases of the plague in the last 10 years, according to the agency.Marmots are large, squirrel-type rodents that live in mountainous areasBubonic plague, known as the Black Death when it killed an estimated 25 million people in Europe during the Middle Ages, is now rare.It is a bacterial disease mainly affecting wild rodents that is spread by fleas. Humans bitten by infected fleas can then develop bubonic plague.Once bacteria infects the lungs, human-to-human transmission of pneumonic plague can occur through coughing.If diagnosed early, bubonic plague can be successfully treated with antibiotics, while pneumonic plague has a high mortality rate, the World Health Organization says.BBC Newslast_img read more

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