November Tests: SuperBru predictions

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Wales v ArgentinaOur predictions: Wales are due an international win with Sam Warburton at the helm and Argentina are now in the horrible habit of losing. They may turn it round, but there’s an air of inevitability here… Wales by 8France v TongaOur predictions: Could France finally be turning a corner? Much will be made of Freddie Michalak’s almost-quiet return to the French bench, but they look like pulling themselves together. Maybe. Please? France by 23 Ireland v AustraliaOur predictions: Head on the chopping block. No explanation. Whisper it. A drawScotland v South AfricaOur predictions: This one’s heart versus head. Scotland love the underdog tag too, but while Bakkies Botha says that Scotland are a ‘phenomenal’ side, they should slog away and gain some credit without actually scoring enough tries to pull away from the Boks. South Africa by 11center_img Centurion: Dan Carter will earn his 100th cap for the All Blacks against England at Twickenham. An omen?THE NOVEMBER Tests never give up; never roll over; never let you accurately gamble on a list of score-line predictions. But hey-ho, we’ll give it another go as some more really juicy clashes come up. The All Blacks at Twickenham, Wallabies at the Aviva and Springboks at Murrayfield, anyone?We offer up our predictions below, but if you see yourself as a bit of a guru when it comes to guessing win margins then enter our exclusive November Tests SuperBru pool and have a bash. You could win a year’s subscription to the magazine…Italy v FijiOur predictions: An emotionless spanking for Italy last week against the Wallabies means that they will be dying to give a better account of themselves. Will Fiji actually turn up in the right frame of mind to play the Italian’s at their own game? Italy by 11England v New ZealandOur predictions: Well, well, well. Any logic being applied to this one could come back and bite a predictor, but we’ll give it a go. But really bluntly. New Zealand didn’t blow France away. England never take a massive tonking. Both are used to winning. New Zealand by 13last_img read more

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Get the very best of Rugby World this summer

first_imgReading up: Wales and Lions star Jonathan Davies thumbs through Rugby World (pic by Rugby PR) It is set to be an extraordinary few months of rugby – we have sevens at the Olympics before the new season kicks off in the Aviva Premiership, Guinness Pro12 and Top 14. Before you know it there will be big November Tests coming up and European rugby returns. Then the Six Nations kicks off and after all the major club finals it will be Lions time!Okay, we’re getting a little ahead of ourselves. There’s still all of summer to go. So we thought we’d celebrate the sunshine and the brilliant times ahead with a very special subscription offer. That’s right, we want to make your reading experience even better, rugby fans.You may be a faithful, regular reader of Rugby World magazine and buy each issue at the supermarket or newsagent. Have you ever considered joining us as a subscriber? Here is what’s in it for you: TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS You won’t miss a single issue of your favourite magazine: We send it direct to your door every four weeks – no effort required on your part!As a subscriber you pay less that you would at the news stands, with the lower price guaranteed for 12 months. See below for just how much you’d save.You get access to the iPad/iPhone editions of the magazine thrown in at no extra cost.You can download your first digital magazine right away.Finally, as part of our summer sale, we also throw in a £5 M&S gift card.Subscribe to the deal here!Because after all this, you’ll end up only spending is £18.49 every six months, with a whopping saving of 38%! It’s a good enough deal to distract you from the dread of pre-season or the long hours spent in the garden, wishing the season would start… Happy summer everyone, and here’s to the rugby ahead!last_img read more

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The greatest day in Uruguay rugby history

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Why Uruguay’s victory over Fiji at the 2019 World Cup has global significance too The greatest day in Uruguay rugby historyHow do you miss 48 tackles in 80 minutes and still win a Test match against a top-ten team? Ask Uruguay, for that’s exactly what they did against Fiji in their opening game of the 2019 Rugby World Cup.That tackle statistic is quite incredible. The Teros may have made 155 tackles but they missed 48 for a success rate of 76% – hardly the sort of figures that usually lead to a victory. Yet they scrambled effectively on so many occasions when a tackle was missed to bring down Fiji’s dangerous runners – and there were plenty of them!Mad scramble: Filipo Nakosi is halted by two Uruguay defenders (Getty Images)Related: Fiji 27-30 Uruguay Match ReportA quick glance through the statistics without knowing the result would suggest the islanders had run away with this game – 687 metres made, 15 line breaks, 21 ball carries from Leone Nakarawa alone. But pride and passion cannot be measured as easily and that’s exactly what Uruguay delivered.Fiji may have had the individual stars in their line-up, but the power of the collective is what came to the fore for the South Americans and secured only their third World Cup win in history.People will point to the four-day turnaround Fiji had between the Australia and Uruguay matches, as well as their profligacy in possession – they conceded 27 turnovers – and goalkicking inaccuracy, but to highlight Fiji’s flaws is to miss Uruguay’s strengths and does the Teros a disservice.Fiji have inflicted a few World Cup shocks in their time but it was they who got caught out by perhaps underestimating the Uruguayans here.Uruguay are 19th in the world rankings – higher only than Russia (20), Canada (22) and Namibia (23) at this World Cup. Little was expected of them, especially in a pool as competitive as this, although it’s not quite as bad as the one they had in 2015, when they lost all their games to Australia, England, Fiji and Wales.Fitting stage: A lineout during Fiji v Uruguay (Getty Images)Yet the reason we love sport is when people or teams exceed expectations, spring surprises and cause upsets. That’s exactly what we saw from Uruguay – and it was apt that it happened in Kamaishi, the ground built to pay tribute to those who lost their lives in the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. An emotional setting for an emotional win.Related: Rugby World Cup Greatest Shocks And that raw emotion shown at the final whistle, players and coaches in tears, was reminiscent of Uruguay’s first foray into this tournament in 1999, when Diego Ormaechea scored a try – at the age of 40 no less – as he led his country to victory against Spain.It’s somewhat fitting, then, that his two sons – Juan Diego and Agustin – came off the bench to share in another famous win here at Japan 2019.Rugby is a strong tradition in the Ormaechea family and the hope is that a victory such as this can act as a springboard to get more Uruguayans involved in the sport. For so long, they have been the little brother to Argentina in South American rugby but if they can build on this, their greatest day, they can increase their talent pool and become more competitive on the world stage.Show of support: Uruguay fans celebrate a famous victory (Getty Images)Uruguay already have several players involved with Major League Rugby clubs in the USA and there are plans to launch a professional league in South America too. This result will only help raise the profile of the sport and hopefully speed up such developments.Plus, with the youngest squad at this World Cup, there is huge scope for improvement – and more significant victories – over the coming years.“We were looking to shock the world – and we have taken the first step,” said Uruguay captain Juan Manuel Gaminara afterwards. “Now we want the win with Georgia as well as to continue achieving our goals – and that is to win both matches. We are all confident and believe it’s possible. We set out to be leaders. This team did a great job today and will do so again.”While Uruguay play Georgia on Sunday, they should take the time to savour this win. It’s significant not just for them but the global game, proving that there is still scope for shocks in Test rugby.Let’s hope this is the first but not the last upset we see at Japan 2019. Boys in blue: Uruguay players show their delight at the final whistle (Getty Images) TAGS: Uruguay Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage, which we update regularly with news and features.Follow Rugby World magazine on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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Young adults immersed in faith, advocacy, leadership training

first_imgYoung adults immersed in faith, advocacy, leadership training Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth & Young Adults Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An ecumenical group of young adults attends a workshop during a meeting of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. Episcopal Church representative Andrea Bardelmeier is third from left; at front center is Jason Sierra, Episcopal Church officer for young adult leadership and vocations.[Episcopal News Service] Two years ago, Andrea Bardelmeier attended the meeting of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women with a group of other Episcopal young adults. “That was kind of a life-changing experience,” she says.Now a leader in ecumenical and multi-faith ministries at Xavier University in Cincinnati, she is spending this week at another young adult “immersion” experience through the Episcopal Leadership Institute, this time focused on Episcopal Migration Ministries.The institute is an initiative of the Episcopal Church’s Young Adult Campus Ministries Office that officially began last year and grew out of the church’s UNCSW young adult programs that started in 2009. “Basically, it is to connect young adults with the leadership of our networks to really see how we can infuse new leadership into those networks and also help the young adults gain access to what each is doing on a bigger scale,” said Jason Stewart Sierra, officer for young adult leadership and vocations.The institute focuses on four components, starting with short-term immersion experiences where small groups of young adults – ages 18 to 30 – attend a church gathering around an advocacy issue. The first such experience happened in 2009, when 10 young women spent a week at the UNCSW. “That was an opportunity for them to see on a big scale how women were organizing around gender justice and women’s rights and to see how the Episcopal Church was involved with that,” Sierra said.Later programs included one with Churches for Middle East Peace, which included advocacy training with the Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations, and an eco-justice immersion experience in Seattle for 20 young adults. So far, 73 young adults from at least 41 dioceses have participated in institute programs, including the UNCSW visits.“The second piece is to really look at Episcopal identity formation, so we open and close every day with a daily office,” Sierra said. They explore Episcopal polity “so that people have a fuller understanding of how this work of advocacy fits into our broader structure.”Third, participants have a chance to be mentored by experts in the field, “not just watch from a distance,” Sierra said. “We try to take them to really where the conversation is vital, so that we’re not sort of babying them into the work, but taking them directly to access the leaders in our church where the work is really dynamic. … With the Middle East Peace, they had this opportunity to go directly to [Capitol] Hill and to be around all these leaders who had been working on this issue for a long time.”Finally, he said, “we really try to engage them in leadership-development training.” This means fostering presentation and facilitation as well as advocacy skills, “so that they can begin to think of themselves as faith leaders, whether or not they’re operating inside the church.”Participants must write about their immersion experiences for their diocesan publications and do a presentation, “so they begin to be seen as an advocacy leader in their home communities,” Sierra said. The institute supports participants in forming communities that stay in touch with each other, and connects them with church networks. “Our role is really to help them make the connection and to prepare them to do the work.”The hope, he said, is that the young adults will begin working in the existing networks, rather than remaining segregated.This week, four young adults involved in campus ministry have joined Sierra at the Episcopal Migration Ministries annual conference in Atlanta. They will spend time focused on how to engage campus ministries with EMM’s work, Sierra said, noting this is the first immersion experience that drew few applicants. “It was somewhat of a surprise.”“That’s interesting,” Bardelmeier said, “because I think it’s really an issue for our time, and I wonder where the disconnect is.”Dayton, Ohio, has an African refugee Episcopal Church gathering, she said.“I would love to do some work connecting Xavier students with refugees,” said Bardelmeir, 29, who is assistant director of the Dorothy Day Center for Faith and Justice at the university.Dan Trudeau, EMM program manager for communications and media development, first worked with refugees through a service-learning group at college in Michigan, volunteering at a program assisting people seeking asylum.“I know how powerful an impact an experience like that can be at that age,” he said. “It was really fascinating for me because I got to meet all these people from all these different countries … It was eye-opening.”At this week’s conference, he said, “Our plan is to have the young adult participants engage directly with the staff that we have in our affiliate network who do outreach to churches.” Participants will receive training on church outreach techniques for building awareness and support for the refugee-resettlement program.“We really want to build the next generation of advocates and supports for refugees in the church,” Trudeau said. “I’m hoping that this first-hand interaction with our local staff people who are operating in their diocese and in their communities will really give these young adults a picture of all that goes on to welcome refugees into the United States and an idea of how they can contribute to really having a positive impact on the effort.”Ashley Pagan, 23, graduated in December from the University of Arizona and learned about the EMM immersion experience from the campus chaplain. Moving to Tucson and working with immigrants had piqued her interest in immigration and refugee issues, she said. She volunteers regularly at a food kitchen and orphanage in Naco, Mexico.“I’m really excited, but at the same time a little nervous and scared,” she said before the conference. “I’m sure it will be a week I’ll never forget.”The “immersion” aspect appealed to her, she said. “I definitely prefer those than just sitting and listening to talk.”Bardelmeier’s first immersion experience was at the 2010 UNCSW. “I met women from all over the world, struggling with so much.” She recalled meeting a woman from Turkey who was kicked out of university for wearing a hijab. “She couldn’t be educated because of her faith. It was those kind of conversations that just punctuated the entire week. It was very powerful.”“I think the enduring impact has been the connections I made with other women in the Episcopal Church throughout the country,” she said. “Ultimately, that’s why I applied for another one.”“What inspired me to apply to this particular conference is that my brother-in-law is a refugee from Cambodia,” she added. “The Christian Reform Church brought him over and resettled him in my hometown. I feel like that’s now part of my story in a way.”“I think the Episcopal Church is kind of leading the way with migration ministries,” she said. “I want to learn more.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By Sharon SheridanPosted Mar 29, 2012 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

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Benchmarking the church

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Phyllis Strupp says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET July 31, 2012 at 5:45 pm Thank you for that inspiring commentary! Another aspect of GC77 that we haven’t lifted up is that the measure of a church’s vitality is not average Sunday attendance (ASA). The Church is vital when it serves the community during the week, not just how many are drawn to the Sunday worship. I’ll use your comments in a sermon–and I will be sure to attribute them to you! Phyllis Strupp says: July 31, 2012 at 5:50 pm Possibly one of the better articles addressing declining mainland church attendance. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY By Phyllis StruppPosted Jul 31, 2012 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Marylin Day says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Michael Palazzolo says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Doug Desper says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Phyllis Strupp says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 August 1, 2012 at 12:08 pm Michael thank you for bringing your gifts to the church, including patience. We need them! Submit an Event Listing [Episcopal News Service] In the wake of the 77th General Convention, journalists from two esteemed pillars of the press (The Wall Street Journal on the right and The New York Times on the left) have leveled some harsh criticisms of the Episcopal Church, citing long-term decreases in church attendance and finances. Both writers attribute the church’s impending decline to the same cause: a failure to stake out theological positions that meet the political leanings of Episcopalians.The Wall Street Journal op-ed suggested that conservatives, disappointed with the church’s expansion of gay rights, went home from convention empty-handed: “Its numbers and coffers shrinking, the church votes for pet funerals but offers little to the traditional faithful.”The New York Times op-ed claimed the church has failed liberals by weakening the theological underpinnings of the liberal Christianity that fueled the social gospel and civil rights movements: “Today, by contrast, the leaders of the Episcopal Church and similar bodies often don’t seem to be offering anything you can’t already get from a purely secular liberalism.”Other voices claimed, “The church is falling! The church is falling!” after the 2003, 2006 and 2009 conventions, as well. Granted, the Episcopal Church and other mainline denominations are fighting for their very survival. But to know how the struggle is coming along, you have to monitor the right barometer of success. And how happy conservatives and liberals are with the church is not the right measure.For Christians, the things of God are to be prioritized over worldly matters such as politics. When Peter was upset with Jesus’ predictions of his own death, Jesus turned to him and said, “Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; you do not have in mind the things of God, but the things of men.” (Matthew 16:23)So, what is the best benchmark to assess the church’s attention to the things of God? In our skeptical post-modern times, hope is the best measure of spiritual vitality. Hope is a sign that we are keeping the Bible alive spiritually, according to Paul in Romans 15:4: “For everything that was written in the past was written to teach us, so that through endurance and the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope.”In terms of brain chemistry, hope is an indicator that fear is under control. But to have the inner strength to choose hope over fear, trust in God or another higher power is essential. The concept of trust in a higher power in the universe fits well with a secular worldview, as William James, twelve-step programs and U.S. currency have taught us (America has been printing “In God we trust” on its currency since 1864).However, decades ago the mainstream secular institutions chose to trade a higher power for humanism, which has bred hopelessness in many forms. One of the most hopeless topics of the secular world today is the state of the environment. Scientists, concerned by the dire outlook presented by their climate models, have struggled to maintain the hope that would encourage others to take action. Some scientists have turned to faith communities for hope, as illustrated by this 2008 statement from Gus Speth, dean of the Yale School of Forestry and the Environment:“Thirty years ago, I thought that with enough good science we would be able to solve the environmental crisis. I was wrong. I used to think that the greatest problems threatening the planet were pollution, bio-diversity loss and climate change. I was wrong there too. I now believe that the greatest problems are pride, apathy and greed. Because that’s what’s keeping us from solving the environmental problem. For that, I now see that we need a cultural and spiritual transformation. And we in the scientific community don’t know how to do that. But you [in the faith community] do. We need your help.”Is the Episcopal Church nurturing seeds of hope for better tomorrow with regard to the environmental crisis and secular venues where hopelessness persists? Are church-going Christians more hopeful than the fast-growing “spiritual but not religious” crowd? Hope is contagious. Hope is the best yardstick to use for benchmarking the church’s performance and prospects. Hope opens our minds to the things of God—no matter what the current numbers say. All things are possible with God.– Phyllis Strupp is the author of Church Publishing’s Faith and Nature curriculum and the author of The Richest of Fare: Seeking Spiritual Security in the Sonoran Desert. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 July 31, 2012 at 10:31 pm I really don’t understand the people who long for an Episcopal Church of the past which wouldn’t welcome me or my gifts. I’ve been an Episcopalian for about 30 years now, and was happy to join a non-dogmatic church centered on common prayer. I thought we didn’t need to agree on everything we believed in, but came together to pray and have communion. Now there are some in the church who think we’re baptists or Roman Catholics … What happened? Even though there is evidence that the Scripture passages used to condemn gay people are really talking about ritual prostitution, conservatives are willing to treat people badly and break their baptismal vows for what, some political motives or attempt to hang on to power in the church? All I want to do is be a full member, like you, of my Christian community, which happens to be an Episcopal church. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Comments (10) August 1, 2012 at 11:19 am Thanks Sylvia–maybe we can start a viral hope meme! Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tony Price says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Art House says: center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls August 1, 2012 at 6:03 pm Thank you, Grant, for beautifully expressing for me what I’ve always loved about the Episcopal Church. After reading the articles in the NY Times and the Wall Street Journal I spent several sad hours realizing that vast numbers of people just don’t get it. The Episcopal Church in our time is trying mightily to live out the core teaching of Jesus which is that EVERYONE is worthy of acceptance, inclusion and love. Pure and simple, but hard. I, for one, feel so humble and grateful to be a member. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Jane Linn says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rev. Sylvia Vasquez says: Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Benchmarking the church August 1, 2012 at 11:18 am Hey Art, maybe God is more socially liberal than you or me, and the church leadership is on the right track! Keep the faith. July 31, 2012 at 8:10 pm To Art House – you are correct that most church going members have no idea about the policy decisions, recommendations, etc. that go on in the national levels of the church. However, each of us, if we care at all, has a responsibility to stay informed about the “goings on” at the national and international level. This is just like our desire to stay informed about Congress and the government – at the local, state and national levels.For some though, like you said, maybe it is a good thing to be uninformed – sticking their heads in the sand and maybe, just maybe, this new church will go away.I believe our Episcopal Church has gifts for everyone – conservative and liberal alike. You choose your parish to fit your yearnings and needs and the best way you might serve. Each parish is different – each has their own personality. We don’t have to attend the church nearest our home and we can become as involved as we like. Thank God we don’t HAVE to do most everything this church decides at the national level – we can decide locally how we serve God and find spiritual comfort. July 31, 2012 at 6:00 pm We all know why church attendance has dwindled in the past ten years, no matter how much positive spin is put on it. The church leadership is far, far more socially liberal, sometimes recklessly so, than the the church-going population as a whole. We’ve already witnessed erosion of membership in our parish as a result of actions taken at the recent convention. When the hard-copy edition of Episcopal Life was discontinued, I was saddened; now I’m thankful. If the majority of Episcopalians were aware of what’s going on at the highest levels of church leadership (and believe me, most do not), we’d have even fewer people continuing as members. Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID August 4, 2012 at 3:34 pm Let’s remember, during all the talk about justice, inclusion, setting things right, responding to the culture’s itches, etc, etc, that the Church was given a Great Commission: “Go, therefore…make disciples…teach…” If we are doing that we will see numbers because numbers represent individuals – people who have been formed as Christians. The Church IS about numbers, not just causes. It is very likely that people have been walking away from our Church – as increasingly noted – because it has often been found that there is little difference between what is being preached and taught in our churches, and the secular liberalism that embraces (and just as quickly discards I noticed) the radical demands of society like in the Occupy Movement (which has now largely discredited itself despite being covered thoroughly here on ENS). A better mind than mine noticed this years ago and said prophetically and accurately that the Church that marries this present age will become a widow in the next. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

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John Perris named rector of Christ the King, Frankfurt

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA John Perris named rector of Christ the King, Frankfurt Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab People New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Christ the King Anglican/Episcopal Church of Frankfurt announces the arrival of Fr. John Perris as its new rector. Fr. Perris will celebrate his first service of Holy Eucharist at Christ the King on February 2 at its regular Sunday service at 11am. All are welcome.Christ the King Anglican/Episcopal Church has served the needs of English-speaking Christians in Frankfurt since 1957. It belongs to the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe. Currently CtK has about 150 regular parishioners who attend Sunday services. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted Jan 14, 2014 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

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Coal Country Hangout connects youth, community

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Coal Country preschoolers take part in a field trip led by Beth Garner, an education specialist with the Pennsylvania Department of Natural Resources, to Prince Gallitzin State Park. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Northern Cambria, Pennsylvania] Against the low-hanging, late-October morning sky the stone building with the red metal roof housing the Coal Country Hangout Youth Center casts a stark profile at the corner of Maple Avenue and Cottonwood Street in this rural community an hour and 40 minutes’ drive northeast of Pittsburgh in the Allegheny Mountains.On the inside, however, bright-colored murals hang on paneled walls and the sound of babies and toddlers busy playing and learning fill the space, in what is the only day care center and one of two preschools serving Northern Cambria, a rural bedroom community, and Altoona, Johnstown and Indiana, each town a 40- to-50-minutes away.“Fifty percent of the children in day care have parents that work in these three communities; Northern Cambria is the hub,” said the Rev. Ann Staples, an Episcopal deacon who co-founded and has served as Coal Country’s executive director since 1996.In addition to operating the day care in a county where 14.9 percent of the population lives in poverty and providing early childhood education in one of Pennsylvania’s poorest school districts, Coal Country operates a program for teens and young adults on Friday and Saturday nights in a converted sanctuary, with a basketball court, billiards and table tennis on the main level, and a small computer laboratory in the balcony.“There are no facilities for kids anywhere in this area,” said Staples. “It is rural, it is isolated, it’s a good 35-40 minute drive to anything resembling recreational facilities, and that’s why we founded Coal Country – so they’d have a place to get off the streets, have a good time under supervision.”Portraits of miners painted by students hang on the walls of the Coal Country Hangout Youth Center. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSA safe, drug-free environment where youth can be with their peers is important, said Rebecca Pupo, the principal of Northern Cambria High School, during an interview with Episcopal News Service in her office, adding that drug-sniffing dogs recently swept the school for marijuana and heroin, local drugs of choice.“(Coal Country) definitely serves these kids and they need the positive social connections,” she said. “Some go home to an empty house … the closest shopping mall is a 40-minute drive. Unless a student is involved in sports or other extracurricular activities, there’s nowhere to go.“Not everyone is a football-Friday person.”An independent nonprofit organization and supported ministry of the Diocese of Pittsburgh, the center’s name is a homage to the coal industry’s longstanding, historical importance to the region’s economy and its identity. Its mission is to support families by providing access to affordable childcare, to promote healthy family behaviors, and to help prevent youth delinquency.Operating in an economically depressed, geographically isolated region where ethnic bonds date back to the late 19th century, its programs take a holistic educational and cultural approach to address the spiritual and emotional trauma caused by the coal industry’s collapse.“It’s Appalachia, they are very tight-knit and very wary of outsiders – they know instantly, probably before you open your mouth, that you are not from around there,” said Pittsburgh Bishop Dorsey McConnell, in an interview with ENS in his suburban Pittsburgh office. “So in that sense Ann’s been a missionary, because she’s been able to insert herself in that community and over time, she’s gained the affection and trust, I think, of everyone in that region.”Raised in Corpus Christi, Texas, Staples studied music with an emphasis in piano performance in the early 1950s at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, spent a year traveling in Europe, and pursued a doctorate in musicology at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. A mother of six, grandmother to 13, she taught college in New York and then for 17 years at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 40 minutes west of Northern Cambria.In Indiana, Staples was a member of Christ Episcopal Church, when in 1984 the Diocese of Pittsburgh ordained her a deacon. She has served parishes throughout Pennsylvania, including Verona, Murrysville, Indiana, Patton and Northern Cambria, where she continues to serve St. Thomas Episcopal Church.Staples models her ministry after that of the Rev. Curtis Junker, her college chaplain at SMU, where she left Methodism and joined the Canterbury Club.Junker moved comfortably between Dallas society and people on the street, and he encouraged students to tag along while he carried out his ministry. “That experience made all the difference in the world to me,” said Staples. “For me it was a model of ministry, the way it ought to be. Sitting in the church holed up – it doesn’t work.”Staples has lived out Junker’s example by being a visible presence in the community, by getting to know elected officials, businessmen, community developers, teachers and school administrators, and people on the street. Around town, everyone calls her “Deacon Ann.”“Whenever Ann walks into a room or an office … people get up from their chairs to greet her,” said McConnell. “She just has enormous respect; the reason is the people of Northern Cambria are not a project to her – they are human beings, made by God and redeemed by Jesus Christ.“She has spent the time that she has been up there cultivating relationships across the board. That has been strategic, to a certain degree, but the fact is also she’s just committed to strengthening the human bonds in those communities in any way that she can do, and of course those communities are deeply relational.”The Rev. Ann Staples, an Episcopal deacon, describes on a map the area of rural Pennsylvania served by the Coal Country Hangout Youth Center. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSThe borough of Northern Cambria, population 5,000, was incorporated in 2000 when the towns of Spangler and Barnesboro merged. It was a move intended to qualify the town for federal aid but did not. In fact, the borough is so small the U.S. Census Bureau includes it in the statistics for Johnstown, population 20,000.Staples arrived in Northern Cambria to serve St. Thomas Episcopal Church in September 1993, the same time as Coal Country co-founder Pastor Marty Cartmell arrived at St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church. During the summer of 1994, as both women were still getting to know the community, each witnessed teenagers’ boredom-fueled antics.“We did a lot of running around and seeing what the place was like and we discovered on summer nights that kids were just all over the town, just all over, everywhere,” said Staples over a stromboli at Hubcaps Grill, a pizzeria across from Cambria Heights High School just outside Patton, one of four high schools she assists in implementing Coal Country’s experiential learning program.The teens had “invented a lovely game at the main intersection in town at the light,” Staples said. “Highway 219 comes up a slope, makes a total left-hand turn and proceeds out of town. The kids all got together and sat down on the highway and made a wall across the highway just at the point where the trucks coming up 219 had to rev their motors … to get around that curve. And here’s a wall of kids – they’d blow their truck horns, the kids would jump up screaming,” she continued, somewhat amused.“Marty and I both saw this, and said, ‘My God, these kids have got to have something to do,’ and that’s where it started right there.” She stressed that the kids were never really in danger. But the human wall was more indicative of the “mindless, generalized vandalism” evidenced in town.Coal Country began with the teen program in 1996. In 2000 the organization bought the building, a decommissioned Roman Catholic church – one of 13 closed that year by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown – for $1.“We started with a teen program before we got the building we’re in now, for the first four years ,… then created the day care, preschool, and then established the experiential education component,” said Staples.Experiential education Regional high school graduation rates are high, but the percentage people who go to college drops dramatically. Mining jobs pay in the $60,000 range; the median household income is $41,730. The area is home to a large percentage of elderly people looking for a lower cost of living, and low-income people who rely on social services.The experiential education program provides for creative projects and fieldwork, and students who participate in Coal Country’s experiential education program tend to score higher on standardized tests, and 100 percent go on to college.“We looked at graduation rates four all four school districts, 94-97 percent, post-secondary drops 30 to 35 percent in all four school district, said Staples. “It goes to prove a point: you cannot simply do it while sitting in a classroom with a textbook, without this kind of experience in the field.“We’re proud of that; we think it’s an interesting statistic.”Experiential education includes, arts, local history, environmental education and contemporary issues, which together bring awareness, not just to the students who participate, but the community, of a sense of place, not only of the region’s coal production and role in building American cities, but its significance in American history.“The things that I cherish most about growing up in Texas wouldn’t have happened anywhere else,” said Staples, who maintains a Texas lilt complete with the cuss words she grew up with. “Any place where you are is important, it pinpoints all these things you grow up to be.”A stone and ceramic monument made by students participating in Coal Country’s experiential education program marks Kittanning Path, an old trail that crosses northern Cambria County. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSLong before the industrial revolution, Native Americans and European settlers occupied the region. Through arts grants, students have erected stone and ceramic monuments highlighting battles, trade and settlers’ routes. For instance, the monument at Kittanning Path marks a Native American trail that cut east and west through western Pennsylvania used by Europeans to settle the region and beyond.“This was the major highway for settlers in the century prior to the U.S. becoming a country, and we think history is important,” said Staples, while driving the winding rural Allegheny Mountain roads in her red 2003 Saturn, odometer reading more than 200,000 miles, the radio tuned to classical music.In American history students learn about what happened on the Eastern Seaboard, “where all the action was. Kids grow up without knowing what happened here or that it had any value,” she added.Deacon Ann Staples, artist Michael Allison and teacher Kady Manifest, discuss a student art project during a meeting at Cambria Heights High School. Lynette Wilson/ENSNorthern Cambria High School social studies teacher Karen Bowman has led students in four local history projects, including a documentary film project “We Never Got the Welcome Home: Vietnam Vets of Western PA Remembered,” the latter completed with the help of a $10,000 grant from the History Channel.Produced by 14 students, the film features more than two dozen area Vietnam vets, who reflect on their return home from the war nearly 30 years earlier, and how their lives and the region had changed. Cambria County, population 140,000, has a high rate of military service and is home to more than 13,000 veterans.In teacher Ron Yuhas’ biology class an environmental grant from Coal Country allowed students to go out into the field to measure water quality in the West Branch Susquehanna to assess the damage from acid mine drainage.“The kids are outdoorsmen and sportsmen and concerned with water quality,” said Yuhas, adding that a new grant will allow for continued monitoring.The school district is focused on getting students prepared for vocational education and college, and there’s not always funding or time for electives, said Pupo, the school’s principal.“Really we need to ensure that they are going to be productive members of society. Some have big dreams of moving to other places,” said Pupo. “The challenge is, as they walk out of here, they compete for jobs in the real world.”Pennsylvania’s ‘energy county’Energy news dominates the headlines in Pittsburgh and the local papers: the shale boom, for instance, and events such as an October conference sponsored by the local American Middle East Institute where Oman’s minister of oil and gas praised fracking. Cambria County’s government website bills it as Pennsylvania’s Energy County.” The Obama administration’s so-called “war on coal,” doesn’t make him popular in the region.Wind turbines are churning out energy across central Pennsylvania. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSSigns that coal’s slipping in importance: the giant wind turbines, churning out electricity throughout the region.“Gamesa Energy developed the entire ridge across the central part of the state for wind energy purposes,” said Staples. “That caused major concern for people trying to maintain the coal mines … a new form of energy with nothing to do with coal.”At the start of the 20th century, in 1901, there were 130 significant coal mines in Cambria County; the mines were at their most productive in ‘10s and ‘20s, supplying energy at a time when the U.S. steel industry increased its output by more than 150 percent, becoming the world’s largest steel producer.In the 1970s, as the United States moved from being the world’s largest exporter to the world’s largest importer of steel, the ripple effects were felt throughout Appalachia. In the 1990s, the remaining union mines closed and miner salaries plunged.Ethnic bondsIn the late 19th century Europeans emigrated in large numbers to work in the mines.“When they started coming and they would emigrate in huge batches. Italy, Poland, Wales … this town was totally founded by immigrants,” said Staples. “And they weren’t the kind of people who were people of position back home, so they came here because they could get a job in mining and they formed little cliques based on ethnicity. So much so that in every town in northern Cambria there was a little Catholic Church: one that was Italian, one that was Polish, one that was English, one that was Welsh.”“Fourteen (in all), because every immigrant group that came had a church,” she said, adding that at one point, 94 percent of the community was Roman Catholic.In 2000, the same year Barnesboro and Spangler merged, the Roman Catholic diocese closed all but one of its 14 ethnic parishes, another blow to the region’s cultural identity. Staples said the closings were painful, but “In the end it was very pragmatic, (the bishop) picked the parish that was in the best physical condition, and made it very clear that that was why.”The Young Men’s Polish Legion, the Slovak Club, the Sons of Italy, and other men’s clubs remain open.Quiet streetsAside from the occasional sound of heavy trucks roaring up Crawford Avenue to where it intersects Highway 219, or Philadelphia Avenue as it’s called in town, the streets are quiet.Mom-and-pop shops – a tiny grocery that specializes in lottery tickets, Italian restaurants and pizzerias, a liquor store, a shoe store, a public library, a home appliance store – occupy retail space on Crawford and Philadelphia avenues, the core of the borough’s downtown.On Oct. 30, Coal Country board members gathered at the center to talk about its importance to the community in a conversation that eventually turned nostalgic and led to talk about creating jobs and opportunities for young people.That same day Cambria County had been dealt another blow – the loss of more than 400 jobs – when it was announced that a Virginia-based coal mining company would sell off “a large chunk” of its Pennsylvania assets to a Kittanning-based company.Later, young people arrived at Coal Country to decorate for the following night’s Halloween dance. Phillip “Flip” Schlereth, who’s been coming for six years, was there, as was his friend Anthony Reid, who moved to Northern Cambria from Texas a year or so ago and started coming to Coal Country at Flip’s invitation.They come to hang out with friends and meet new people, Reid said.Julia DeLoatch, 20, was there along with her 16-year-old sister and 17-year-old brother. DeLoatch, who works at Dairy Queen with a goal to get out of town, came to help set up for the dance, but also to encourage her sister and brother to stay out of trouble, she said.When Staples and Cartmell, who later parted ways with the organization, first opened the doors, no one came; it took time to build trust among the community and the youth. The fact that 40 to 50 youth now come on weekend nights is a sign that the people are comforted and healed, said McConnell, the bishop of Pittsburgh. “Missional communities are always relational communities … that the public gospel, which is to say that what is taking place in that youth hangout center, is definitely growing out of a heart that people have come to trust.“The fact is you don’t have to prove yourself that you are a certain way to get into that youth center, you just walk in. …,There are certain expectations because I think that Ann is really interested in seeing kids grow up into the people that God wants them to become.”In a community where the majority of the signs indicate it’s a place that has been beaten down, there exists a kind of “cultural accommodation of despair” and the future seems like a big challenge, said McConnell.“But then you walk into that place and you see what’s going on in there and it gives everybody a reason to hope. I think that’s one of the reasons she’s precious in that community – you don’t to have have a kid in that program in order to be proud of it,” said McConnell. “They can point at her and say, ‘We’re not dead yet. See there is some life here.’ ”– Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Mary Taggart says: Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL March 9, 2015 at 5:51 pm Thank you for this wonderful article. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET February 14, 2015 at 10:16 am Fabulous story! Deacon Ann is an inspiration! An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Coal Country Hangout connects youth, community Deacon devotes decades to building connections Submit a Job Listing Kimberly Karashin says: Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Youth & Young Adults Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Comments (3) Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI February 11, 2015 at 6:58 am Ann Staples is my hero! She lives what she believes and says. Many thanks for this story. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Moni McIntyre says: By Lynette Wilson Posted Feb 10, 2015 Comments are closed. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

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History of Anglicanism in Rwanda preserved in new Kigali archive

first_img Juliette Mukankwiro and Dinah Igiraneza, part of the Kigali archive team, pose in front of some of the material they have sorted and stored. Photo: Jesse Zink[Anglican Communion News Service] A new archive in the Diocese of Kigali is allowing Anglicans the opportunity to learn more about the history of the church in Rwanda.In early 2015, a small group of people began wading through years of old files and papers that were kept in a shipping container near the diocesan offices. The team spent much of their time cleaning and dusting off the paperwork and then bringing it into a special room prepared for this purpose. There, over a period of about nine weeks concentrated work, they sorted the material by subject and time period and filed it in new binders.Juliette Mukankwiro, a parishioner at St Peter’s Church in the Remera neighbourhood of Kigali, coordinated the project. She recalled that “it was exhausting work and mentally tiring. But we felt really satisfied because we were serving the church that we belong to.”By day, Mukankwiro works at the Ministry of Agriculture where an important part of her job is keeping track of records so she was well prepared for this task.The collection – which is in French, Kinyarwanda, and English – is now stored in close to 200 binders, with a small amount of material still unsorted. The material represents a remarkable range of Rwandan ecclesial, social, and political history. It begins with the arrival of Anglican missionaries in Kigali in the 1940s and stretches to the present day. It includes minutes of Mothers’ Union meetings over the decades, correspondence of church leaders with local government officials, parochial reports and statistics of church attendance, reports on the church’s work of reconciliation after the 1994 genocide, and much, much else.Mukankwiro was delighted to find the deed of land in which a local chief granted to Anglican missionaries the land on which her Remera parish church now sits. Dating to 1948, the deed has a hand-drawn map showing the plot of land and the chief’s thumbprint in lieu of a signature. “People have forgotten this history,” she said. “We can now remember these people who helped build our churches.”Because the Diocese of Kigali was once the only diocese in Rwanda, there are documents from around the country. There are also documents related to the life of the former province of Rwanda, Burundi, and Boga-Zaire and its division into three in the early 1990s. Preparatory documents for various Lambeth Conferences are contained in the archive, as is correspondence between Rwandan church leaders and the Anglican Communion Office during periods of painful church conflict before and after the genocide.The project had the support of the diocesan bishop Louis Muvunyi, as well as the support of Kigali’s link diocese, Ely, in the Church of England, which contributed towards the cost of the project. The diocese is currently considering ways to develop the collection further, including how to continue to add new material and make it available to researchers and others.The archive team created a catalogue to the various binders, which details what is in each. A copy of the catalogue is kept in the diocesan office. A separate copy is now also kept at the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide in England.Mukankwiro thinks that the church’s past is important for the church’s life today: “The church in the past had people who had the life of the church at their heart. People today can learn a lot from the faith others used to have.” Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Africa, By Jesse ZinkPosted Jun 16, 2016 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican Communion Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events History of Anglicanism in Rwanda preserved in new Kigali archive Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

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Historically black church explores faith and justice in gentrified Washington,…

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Nancy Mott says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments (4) Selena Smith says: Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY July 28, 2016 at 5:22 pm Historically black Episcopal churches have a unique perspective, and I admire the people and clergy of Calvary for making an effort to start and to continue the dialogue in their community, and for providing the Church perspective to the topics covered. Rector Belleville, IL By Lynette Wilson Posted Jul 28, 2016 center_img Comments are closed. August 9, 2016 at 10:37 pm In sincerity I ask, don’t you have to talk in order to determine what to do? With limited resources, a determined focus helps. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA July 28, 2016 at 9:42 pm And Pamela Payne, I so hope it will start and continue dialog in Episcopal congregations all over the country. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tom Finlay says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Racial Justice & Reconciliation Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Historically black church explores faith and justice in gentrified Washington, D.C. Rector Smithfield, NC Pamela Payne says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Rev. Peter Jarrett-Schell, rector, and the Rev. Gayle Fisher-Stewart, associate rector, of Calvary Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C., stand for a photo under a Black Lives Matter banner. Photo: Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] The decision to display a Black Lives Matter banner above the parish hall entrance did not come easily for the leadership of Calvary Episcopal Church, a historically black church with a reputation for social justice and action on the U.S. capital’s northeast side.“Some folks have taken offense to it … and I think some people really appreciate it,” said the Rev. Peter Jarrett-Schell, Calvary’s rector, during a recent interview with Episcopal News Service. The decision was “contentious” and “not unanimous,” he said. “It’s also been an opportunity for conversation.”It’s not uncommon for Calvary to engage in discussions that challenge the congregation and the community to think and to act with an intention toward justice.Calvary has initiated conversations – contentious, difficult, provocative and otherwise – over the last two years in particular. Church leaders began talking in earnest after the police shooting of Michael Brown in August 2014 and decided to host a community-wide forum, “Ferguson: Could It Happen Here?” The forum brought together church and community members, and law enforcement officials.“It was a peaceable back-and-forth, that Ferguson can happen here given the right circumstances,” said the Rev. Gayle Fisher-Stewart, Calvary’s associate rector, and a 20-year, now retired, veteran of the D.C. Metropolitan Police. “We know that 90 percent of all civil disorders in this country have the police at their nexus; it doesn’t mean that the police caused it, but that the police were somehow involved, and it could be something fairly simple that blows up.”The Ferguson conversation led Fisher-Stewart, newly ordained a priest last November, to create the Center for the Study of Faith in Justice at Calvary with the help of a grant from the Episcopal Evangelism Society. The grant has allowed the church to host forums focused on themes related to community involvement, race and social justice: police in the community; the black church; and white spaces off limits to blacks, among others. The latter two were workshops facilitated by the Rev. Kelly Brown Douglas, the author of “Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God.”“We realized here at Calvary that we are a black congregation in a predominately white denomination and we’ve kinda had this split personality going,” said Fisher-Stewart, adding that Brown Douglas helped Calvary to redefine its call.“The black church was formed because of injustice. And so if we pick up that mantle again to do justice, which we find in the mission of Christ when he read from the scroll of Isaiah in the temple – it was about doing justice, it was about the least of these,” she said.For example, the most recent forum focused on young black males, asking the question: Are they an endangered species?“We had community organizers, activists, and psychologists, theologians, educators, to help us think about why young black males are endangered beyond the issue of policing, but also: What we are called to do to assist them in becoming the people God has called them to be?”The “what” that God has called young black males to be is something of a focus for Brittany Livingston, a 26-year-old social worker who counsels primarily middle-school-aged African-American males at an all-boys parochial school.“Most of our boys are young African-American males and it can be a challenge because I look at little brown faces every day and they often have real feelings about what’s going on,” said Livingston, adding that sometimes the violence and the overall situation makes her feel helpless. “But going in every day working with those little boys helps me. I’m working with them day-to-day and their lives matter day-to-day to me.”Members and friends of Calvary Episcopal Church participated in a “Do Justice” silent march and prayer vigil for the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives 40th annual conference in Washington, D.C., on July 20. The action was organized by the Center for the Study of Faith in Justice at Calvary. Photo: Lynette Wilson2016 has left many people feeling helpless. July has been a deadly month, both for policemen and black men in Louisiana, Minnesota and Texas. On Sunday, July 17, as members of Calvary left the church following the morning’s Eucharist, news broke of yet another deadly shooting in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, this time, a former Marine killed two policemen and a sheriff’s deputy. It was the “the juxtaposition of these deaths” that “forced the entire nation to stop and take notice,” as the Rev. Charles A. Wynder, a deacon and the Episcopal Church’s missioner for social justice and advocacy engagement, recently wrote in an essay for The Living Church.Livingston, a lifelong member of Calvary, said having a place to come to talk about it helps.“After every community forum or event that we do, something always comes out of it,” she said. “Whether it be someone coming up to you afterward and saying, ‘Hey, become a part of this mentoring program,’ or you see Rev. Gayle and my mom and the church going to protest somewhere, and then on Sundays we are praying about it, and Rev. Schell or Rev. Gayle will get up there and say something about it and so it kinda lifts that helpless feeling,” she said.Livingston’s mother, Ellen Livingston, also a social worker and Calvary leader, has witnessed rhetoric around Black Lives Matter play out in the lives of the young people she works with as well. From the white adolescent girl from a mixed neighborhood whose peers are telling her, she doesn’t belong: “This young lady is trying to deal with something far greater than what she can imagine,” said Livingston. To the young black child who attends a predominantly white summer camp at a prestigious private school where he was targeted by white students: “ ‘So black lives matter,’ and he was being bullied, ‘your life doesn’t matter any more than mine, all our lives matter.’ ”The Black Lives Matter movement, like the Center for the Study of Faith and Justice at Calvary, was born in 2013 out of tragedy, this time with the acquittal of George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch coordinator who shot 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in a gated community just north of Orlando, Florida. The movement grew out of the Twitter hashtag #BlackLivesMatter, calling attention to police and vigilante violence against black Americans.In making the decision to hang the “Black Lives Matter” banner, it came down to the church’s responsibility as a Christian congregation, said Jarrett-Schell.“The Gospel declares that all lives matter, but in this moment right now we see in the eyes of the world and our society, not all lives matter equally and black lives are undervalued and that’s putting it mildly,” Jarrett-Schell said. “We as Christians if we truly believe that the Gospel brings good news for all people, and we look and we see that there’s a group of people in our immediate neighborhood and our society, particularly black people, who are not being treated as children of God, the way they should be, then we have to bear witness to that specifically.”Calvary’s matriarch, a woman described as making space for everyone, initially opposed the Black Lives Matter banner out of concern for what people coming to the church would think. But after walking beneath it a few times, Jarrett-Schell said, she realized the banner says that her life matters and that if someone disagrees they don’t need to come to the church.The Black Lives Matter movement follows the Occupy movement, another grassroots movement that began in New York in 2011, seeking social and economic equality. Just as Occupy took laid bare the worldwide problem of social and economic inequality, Black Lives has brought racism into everyday conversation.“When we look at the problem (racism) in national and international terms, it just seems too big for us to do anything,” said Jarrett-Schell, when asked if some of the most significant change happens at the community level. “And when we look at history, these big turning points, these moments when the arc of history has actually bent toward justice, the apex moment, but we ignore the fact that there has always been years and years of grassroots community work that actually made the big national moment possible.”An already tense presidential election has been made more tense as race relations linger in American’s minds; support for Black Lives Matter, an often-misunderstood movement, runs the spectrum. Yet violence against black Americans is nothing new. Nonblack Americans first saw it broadcast in their living rooms with the beating of Rodney King at the hands of Los Angeles police officers in 1991; it dominated the social commentary in the lyrics of early hip hop music. Smartphones equipped with video cameras have upped the frequency in which police violence has been documented and shared publicly.The Los Angeles police chief called King’s beating an aberration, but the black community and law enforcement officials knew better.“[We said] ‘the aberration’ was that it was caught on film because it happens every day in America,” said Fisher-Stewart, it’s just now that everyone has cell phones. “Now anyone can take out their phone and record what has been going on forever in terms of policing in America.“The crisis has always been there; it’s ever-present now with technology.”Calvary Episcopal Church hosted an exhibit of 200 T-shirts bearing the name, date of birth and date of death of victims of violence crime in the D.C.-metropolitan area. Photo: Gayle Fisher-StewartLong before the church decided to display the Black Lives Matter banner, they hosted an exhibit of more than 200 T-shirts bearing the name, date of birth and date of death of victims of violence crime in the D.C.-metropolitan area. The exhibit, organized by Heeding God’s Call, called on visitors to pray for each individual who had died. The church now is working on a new conversation series, ranging from youth and engaging with the police force to education beyond high school, entrepreneurship and male-female relationships.It’s impossible to have a conversation about police violence and black males without the conversation eventually turning to racism, both cultural and institutional, marginalization and economic inequality. Moreover, forums and the conversations at Calvary are taking place under the backdrop of gentrification.“We are a commuter church, our community is beginning to look nothing like it did when we were kids,” said Ellen Livingston, who grew up a 10- to 15-minute walk from the church and later moved to the suburbs. “This (church) was a community center at one time, and our community is changing, and the gentrification and the isolation and the marginalization of those who are black and have remained in the city, so we want to provide support for them, as well.”Calvary Episcopal Church, a historically black church in Washington, D.C., is located on the city’s gentrified northeast side. Just down the block, at the corner of H Street and Sixth Street NE, Apollo Apartments, anchored by a Whole Foods Market, is under construction on the former site of the historic Apollo Theater. Photo: Lynette WilsonLocated one block off H Street, once the commercial heart of black Washington, D.C., a street that burned during the violent protests that followed the assassination of the Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the church, established as a mission church in a storefront in 1901, now is faced with holding tight to its identity in a gentrified, rapidly changing neighborhood. Once referred to as the “Chocolate City,” the nation’s capital has gone from having a 70 percent African-American majority a generation ago to less than 50 percent black today.“H Street was predominantly black, it was like the downtown for black folks, and it burned, the riots, it burned, just like some portions of Seventh Street, U Street burned, portions of it, the black areas of the city, were the ones that burned, and so it has taken a while for them to totally come back, and as they’ve come back, they’ve come back gentrified,” said Fisher-Stewart.“We are like many of the historically black congregations in D.C. that are surrounded by people who don’t look like us, but we still need to reach out and spread the Gospel to them.”The community’s gentrification is beginning to change the church’s mission. Every third Thursday of the month Calvary hosts a meeting to talk about community changes, such as a massive apartment building anchored by a Whole Foods Market under construction on the corner of northeast Sixth and H streets in what used to be the site the historic Apollo Theater. Other changes are less obvious to newcomers and visitors.“I was driving in this morning – I was coming out West Virginia Avenue by Gallaudet University – and I noticed on the west side of the street where there used to be no sidewalk, just a pathway, there’s now a sidewalk there … that’s where I used to live, I used to live off West Virginia Avenue – there was never any sidewalk on that side of the street. You couldn’t walk on that side of the street unless you walked out in the street but now there’s a sidewalk there – and that’s 50 years,” said Kevin Douglas, a longtime member who grew up within walking distance of the church.There’s no shortage of churches in the immediate neighborhood, nearby a tiny Christian storefront church on H Street identified only with a cross is surrounded by restaurants, juice bars, yoga studios and a boutique selling pet supplies. Calvary’s congregation skews older and female; the vibrant youth group, one of the largest African-American church youth groups in the city, of Brittany Livingston’s childhood, is long gone.“As much as many of our members have moved away, all of our members have a great affection for this neighborhood, even as it is changing rapidly,” said Jarrett-Schell, who in 2012 became the church’s first white rector. “We are looking to be a congregation that shares the Good News of Christ in this particular place and in this particular neighborhood.“We do have a lot of new families moving in and that is really complicated for Calvary … there’s opportunity there, but there is also a great deal of loss, displacement going on. So when we say share the Good News, obviously we are talking in spiritual and temporal terms, there’s a message of hope that the Gospel offers and we want the people in the neighborhood to hear it. There are expectations and social responsibilities that hope; we want the people of this neighborhood to hear about that as well, and we want Calvary to be a place that shares that.”­– Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service.  New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA August 5, 2016 at 8:40 pm Dialogue: an interesting concept. Death of innocents cannot wait for dialogue.Action is needed beyond dialoguelast_img read more

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Anglican Church of Melanesia supports islands hit by tropical cyclone

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Anglican Communion Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Anglican Church of Melanesia supports islands hit by tropical cyclone Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Posted Jun 13, 2017 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events [Anglican Alliance] The Anglican Church of Melanesia is working closely with the National Disaster Management Committee in Vanuatu, with support from Anglican agencies in the Pacific, after a tropical cyclone battered the Torres Islands at the beginning of May.Full article. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

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