Caroline Wozniacki announces she’s retiring from tennis

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailScott Clarke / ESPN Images(NEW YORK) — After nearly 15 years as a professional tennis player, Caroline Wozniacki is retiring from the sport. “I’m ready to move on to the next chapter in my life,” Wozniacki, 29, said Friday on ABC News’ Good Morning America. “Australian Open 2020 is going to be my last tournament.”Wozniacki, currently ranked number 37 in the world, won her lone Grand Slam title at the 2018 Australian Open, defeating top seed Simona Halep.After turning pro in 2005, Wozniacki went on to win 30 Women’s Tennis Association singles titles and was the runner-up at the 2009 US Open and the 2010 WTA Tour Championships.Wozniacki has also faced good friend Serena Williams numerous times, including at the 2014 US Open, where she lost to Williams in the final. She and Williams also attended each other’s weddings, with Williams serving as a bridesmaid in Wozniacki’s wedding earlier this year.Wozniacki married former NBA star Daniel Lee in June in Italy.In addition to being a newlywed, Wozniacki is also pursuing other interests off the tennis court, including studying at Harvard Business School.She said she also hopes to continue to be an advocate for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Wozniacki revealed in 2018 that she had been diagnosed with RA, an autoimmune disease that causes swelling and pain in and around the joints, according to the Arthritis Foundation. Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. Beau Lundcenter_img December 6, 2019 /Sports News – National Caroline Wozniacki announces she’s retiring from tennislast_img read more

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Heading back Home

first_img“So, do you have any exams?”Almost every day for the past few weeks I have been confronted with this question, and the response is always the same. “No,” I answer sheepishly, and then proceed to give a lengthy speech explaining that even though I’m American and only here on a one-year programme as a visiting student and have no exams, I really am working; this year really counts for something; I need to make sure I do well… Chances are that at some point you’ve run across someone like me. At times it seems that Oxford is practically infested with us. For American university students, spending part of their education abroad is becoming more and more common – as popular as gap years are in England. And, Oxford is certainly an attractive location: the rigour of the academic system, the opportunity to work in small tutorials (quite a different scenario from the crowded lecture halls of many American universities), the challenge of adapting to a surprisingly different culture, the chance to view our own country from a new and often critical perspective, and quite simply the opportunity to study at one of the world’s greatest universities manage to attracts us Yanks in droves. Now that my year abroad is drawing to a close, I realise that while all of the above reasons factored in my decision to come here, they were not my genuine motive. During the past few years, I have noticed that the pace of life has been accelerating at an alarming rate. Looking back on my first days of university orientation, I remember how incredibly long that blissful week felt. New faces, new opportunities – it felt like life was just beginning. It didn’t take long for me to sink into the routine – essays, projects, part-time jobs, summer vacations that slipped away before I could even fully appreciate them. As much as I detest clichés, I cannot help but asking, “Where has the time gone?” I came to Oxford looking for newness. By immersing myself in a completely different environment, I hoped to slow time down. And I often think that this feeling of restlessness, this anxious desire to halt time’s passing, plays a part in many foreign students’ decision to study here. Is this a form of escapism? I cannot deny it. However, like all attempts at escape, the relief is only temporary. Time moves quite strangely in Oxford. I think most of us can agree that Trinity is considerably shorter than Michaelmas. And yet, I feel that somehow, I’ve succeeded in slowing time down. America’s national obsession with success leads to a yearning for achievement that sometimes eclipses the thirst for knowledge; finishing with high grades is more important than actually enjoying your subject. While all the Oxford students whom I’ve met genuinely strive to work hard and do well, they seem to keep life in better perspective. They play hard and work hard. This year has given me the chance – for the first time in a long while – to learn my subject for its own sake. However, while I could tell you all about the influence of Calvinism on the poetry of John Donne or Wordsworth’s concept of empathy, these are not the most important things that Oxford has taught me. I’ve learned that the best time to walk though the streets of Oxford is Sunday night, when all of the bells are resounding at once. I’ve learned that after procrastinating for three hours and finally completing an essay at 1am, kebabs are the best food anyone could ask for. Despite my weakness for sentimentality, the simple fact is that soon my fellow exchange students and I will be leaving. Admittedly, in some ways this year has felt like an extended vacation, albeit a very work-intensive one. For finalists this is certainly not the case. However, to a certain extent all university students are indulging in escapism to a degree. No matter how hard we work, we are still fleeing from the reality that soon the situation is going to change. “Enjoy university,” a former teacher once advised me,“because once you get out, it’s all nine to five.” But I would rather not view life in that way. I want to believe that there will always be chances for adventure, always something new to learn. Saving money to travel, taking up a new hobby in one’s forties, going back for further education – all of these could be dubbed “escapism” to a degree. And yet, these are things that make life fulfilling. Call me a hedonist, but I’ve come to believe that life is something to be enjoyed. And, in moderation, a little escapism does no harm at all.ARCHIVE: 6th week TT 2004last_img read more

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YESTERYEAR: THE ELECTION OF 1940

first_imgIn 1940, Republicans were anxious to thwart Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s election to an unprecedented third term as U. S. president. War had recently broken out in Europe, and Wendell Willkie’s criticism of the nation’s isolationist policies helped propel him to the presidential nomination on the Republican ticket. The native Hoosier campaigned in Evansville on October 17, riding in a motorcade that began at the train station on Fulton Avenue, winding along Main Street up to Bosse Field. Willkie is seen here standing in the car at left while passing a bar at 1200 N. Main. An estimated 50,000 excited onlookers witnessed the procession, and although he carried Indiana on election day, Willkie lost his bid in an electoral landslide.FOOTNOTES: We want to thank Patricia Sides, Archivist of Willard Library for contributing this picture that shall increase people’s awareness and appreciation of Evansville’s rich history. If you have any historical pictures of Vanderburgh County or Evansville please contact please contact Patricia Sides, Archivist Willard Library at 812) 425-4309, ext. 114 or e-mail her at www.willard.lib.in.us.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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A look inside: Dudley House Co-op

first_img Opting for the Co-op After-dinner music After dinner, Christopher Johnson-Roberson ’12 strums a number next to Daniel Schade ’11. Mise en place Iman James ’12 assists chef Alice Gissinger ’11 with chopping and dicing. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer Karl Marx wall Daniel Schade ’11 shows the “Tribute to Karl Marx” wall, which also includes a photo of Captain Jean-Luc Picard, the Star Trek character portrayed by actor Patrick Stewart. A good man Christopher Johnson-Roberson does dishes. Trio Bethany Potter ’13, Victoria Koski-Karell ’12, and Christopher Johnson-Roberson ’12 unwind with some tunes. Before the Dudley Co-operative Society was founded in 1958 as alternative housing for Harvard undergraduates, it was a bed and breakfast where Teddy Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge are reported to have slept.Today, co-op resident and ethnomusicology concentrator Christopher Johnson-Roberson ’11 says life in the co-op, which houses 30 undergrads, two resident tutors, and a tutor’s spouse in its two buildings, supports his academic and social interests. “My academic work focuses on how music can be a means to promote social cohesion and also express political protest,” he said. “The jam sessions at the co-op represent a synthesis of all the components of the community that I appreciate.”Residents do their own cooking and cleaning. Multiculturalism is reflected in the co-op’s cuisine during nightly communal meals. One evening, Iman James ’12 chopped fresh bunches of kale while Alice Gissinger ’11 dropped dabs of butter into a wok full of rutabaga for a special vegetarian menu: kale verde con rutabaga, curried couscous, salade de lentilles, and cheesecake.When Gissinger was working intensively on her senior thesis recently, fellow co-op members helped care for her day-to-day needs according to a point system that is described in the co-op sutra, a book of house rules written and updated by previous residents and passed down each year.“In the co-op, it’s not just my social life that’s provided for,” said Gissinger. “There is a feeling of reciprocity that encourages communication, respect, collaboration, and community.” Veggie delight Victoria Koski-Karell ’12 (from left), Bethany Potter ’13, Co-op President Daniel Schade ’11, and Daniel Yavuzkurt ’12 line up for a vegetarian buffet dinner. Pick it Remeike Forbes ’11 (left) plays a spirited rendition of “Old Joe Clark” while changing the words for comic effect. Iman James ’12 listens. Family dinner Remeike Forbes ’11 (from left) bonds over food and talk with Iman James ’12, Katharine Vidt ’13, and Christopher Johnson-Roberson ’12. Fit and happy “Fitness is an important part of co-op life,” said Victoria Koski-Karell ’12, who does pull-ups inside her room at the Dudley Co-operative Society, which is an affiliate of Dudley House that was founded in 1958 as alternative housing for undergraduates. Stirrin’ and fryin’ Alice Gissinger ’11 prepares “kale verde con rutabaga” for dinner. Apple pancake sampler Co-op President Daniel Schade ’11 showcases some kooky art bedazzling the walls. Y’all come back now! Thanks for visiting Dudley House Co-op, where anything is possible…last_img read more

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All that jazz

first_imgWhen Tom Everett arrived at Harvard in 1971, he was wide-eyed to find that the University lacked a connection to one of America’s greatest art forms.“I was so surprised that there was no jazz activity at Harvard,” Everett said during an interview in his basement office, surrounded by music scores and hulking marching band instruments.For Everett, jazz, with its rich musical traditions, was too important for Harvard to ignore. As the new director of the Harvard University Band, he made it his mission to fill that musical hole with expressive sound, and more. For the past four decades, Everett, Harvard’s Office for the Arts (OFA), and the Harvard Music Department have made jazz an important part of University life.To honor that legacy, OFA and the Music Department are sponsoring “40 Years of Jazz at Harvard: A Celebration” today (April 7) through April 10. The event will include a discussion, an alumni reunion, and an exhibition at the Loeb Music Library that opens today. The collection, donated by the Harvard Jazz Bands and OFA, includes jazz scores, photographs, and ephemera over time.Tom Everett conducts the Harvard Jazz Band in a rehearsal for their concert to celebrate the 40-year history of jazz at the University.The celebration will also feature a “Harvard All-Stars” concert on April 9 with the Harvard Jazz Bands and saxophonist Benny Golson, pianist Eddie Palmieri, drummer Roy Haynes, bassist Cecil McBee, trumpeter Brian Lynch, and saxophonist Don Braden ’85.In his first year, Everett created Harvard’s original jazz band, with 10 recruits from the marching band. By the end of that school year, he had a full complement of musicians. The next year he formed a second jazz ensemble. In 1973, he taught the first jazz history course, at Harvard Extension School. Five years later, he introduced an undergraduate jazz course at Harvard College. In the mid-’70s, OFA began supplying funding and support for jazz concerts and other programs. With its help, said Everett, “the program took off.”Everett has been instrumental in securing visiting artists for the annual Jazz Masters in Residence series sponsored by the Harvard Jazz Bands and OFA. Jazz greats such as Slide Hampton, Illinois Jacquet, Benny Carter, Red Rodney, and J.J. Johnson have graced Harvard’s stages, always accompanied by undergraduates from the jazz bands. In 1980, a special concert with the Bill Evans Trio and John Lewis featured the premiere of Lewis’ “The Gates of Harvard,” a work commissioned by OFA.Signaling its commitment to the importance of jazz in the curriculum, Harvard in 2001 hired jazz authority Ingrid Monson, Quincy Jones Professor of African-American Music.“We’ve developed a presence,” said Monson, who has taught several jazz courses and is currently the interim dean of Arts and Humanities. She will take part in a discussion with Everett at the Barker Center on April 8 at 4 p.m.As a testament to how jazz has blossomed at Harvard, the University announced Monday that Wynton Marsalis, the accomplished musician, composer, bandleader, and educator, will launch a two-year performance and lecture series on April 28, with a session at Sanders Theatre.As part of that series, Everett is helping to oversee members of the jazz bands who are mentoring students at Cambridge Rindge and Latin School in preparation for a visit there by Marsalis on April 29.Important lessons in history, creativity, and life are nestled among jazz’s blue notes and syncopation. The improvisational nature of the music helps students to experiment and “think outside the barrel,” Everett said, adding that jazz encourages interaction and challenges students to bring something more to the music “than what was there to start with.”“With jazz there are principles or insights or passions that someone is exposed to … that stay with them throughout their lives.”Visiting jazz masters have shared their experiences with students at Harvard, offering a glimpse of what they themselves learned from jazz legends such as Count Basie, Duke Ellington, and Dizzy Gillespie. But they shared other things, too, including their battles with racism.The social history of jazz is “very much rooted in the American history of race relations in the United States,” said Monson. “Those are always key issues that come up when we talk about the history of the music, and students are very interested in learning about that.”Over the years, many talented student jazz players have attended Harvard, including some who have made the music their careers, including saxophonists Joshua Redman ’91, Fred Ho ’79, and Braden.With a strong mix of talent at hand, Everett said that at times he has had to figure out how to keep everybody interested.“An exciting thing for me was to put together an environment that would challenge them or expose them to something new while not losing everyone else. …  You keep everyone involved, and you challenge everyone.”Everett’s musical training began with the cornet, an instrument similar to the trumpet. Later, he took up the trombone. His best friend in high school, also a trombonist, introduced him to jazz.“He played these things without the music in front of him, and that always amazed me. … I just found the music communicated to me.”For 40 years, Everett and Harvard have helped to communicate the meaning and importance of jazz.“The most rewarding thing is looking and seeing that saxophone player — you watch their eyes while they are playing something, and you see little light bulbs go off … you see these things ticking.”last_img read more

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Pinkett Smith named Woman of the Year

first_imgAs a part of its Celebration of Black Women program, the Harvard Black Men’s Forum (BMF) has selected acclaimed actress Jada Pinkett Smith as Woman of the Year, an honor bestowed upon someone who exemplifies the qualities of leadership, achievement, and commitment to community service. Pinkett Smith will be honored in Leverett House Dining Hall on Saturday.Pinkett Smith (along with her husband, noted actor Will Smith) founded the Village School in Los Angeles, which presently has more than 60 gifted elementary school students from underresourced backgrounds. Through the Will and Jada Pinkett Smith Foundation she has contributed to many worthy causes, including the Haiti Earthquake Relief Fund and the Harvard Foundation’s Japan earthquake/tsunami blanket project. She is well-known for her starring role in the TV series “Hawthorne,” as well as film roles in “The Matrix,” “The Nutty Professor,” and “Ali,” and a voice role in the animated film “Madagascar.”This year marks BMF’s 18th annual Celebration of Black Women, the group’s largest annual event dedicated to honoring the contributions that black women have made to the Harvard community and to society as a whole. Past honorees include Phylicia Rashad, Debbie Allen, Sonja Sohn, and Carla Harris.last_img read more

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Hugh Jackman Gets Insulted By Hand to God Puppet Tyrone

first_img Hand to God Related Shows View Comments Hugh Jackman made a new friend on June 10! The Tony winner and former host took a trip to the Booth Theatre to check out Robert Askins’ wild and crazy comedy Hand to God, starring Steven Boyer, Geneva Carr, Sarah Stiles, Michael Oberholtzer and Marc Kudisch. After the show, Jackman stopped backstage to meet the infamous Tyrone, the possessed puppet in the hit show. Check out these Hot Shots of Jackman backstage with the sock puppet and his co-stars, then see Hand to God on Broadway! Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 3, 2016last_img read more

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SOUTHCOM Lends Helping Hand through Humanitarian Assistance Programs

first_imgBy U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Vito T. Bryant/Defense Media Activity October 01, 2018 U.S. Southern Command’s humanitarian assistance program conducts Defense Department-approved activities within its area of responsibility in conjunction with partner nations to alleviate human suffering, disease, hunger and privation, particularly in regions where those needs may pose major challenges to the civilian populace. By leveraging the combined capabilities of U.S. government agencies, partner-nation military and civilian counterparts, and international organizations, the program enables local governments to strengthen regional security and stability. Civil affairs officers play a vital role in SOUTHCOM’s humanitarian assistance program. “We are like the connective tissue between the DoD and interagency partners that are responding to a major catastrophic event,” said U.S. Army Colonel J. Frank Melgarejo Jr., civil affairs planning detachment chief. “We use our specialized skill sets in order to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the response.” While disaster response is a critical part of the humanitarian assistance mission, the hope is it will become less necessary. “The rapid response effort is about a quarter of what we do,” said U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel Steve Lewis, a SOUTHCOM civil affairs officer. “The other 75 percent is helping our partner nations prepare.” Close Coordination Preparation efforts have included building emergency operations centers and disaster relief warehouses, along with training emergency responders in partner nations. These projects are done in close coordination with the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Office of Foreign Disaster Aid and the Defense Security Cooperation Agency. Between fiscal years 2012 and 2017, they have managed more than 3,000 humanitarian assistance projects within their area of responsibility, which encompasses 31 countries and 16 dependencies and areas of special sovereignty. “One can never underestimate the capability and capacity of the partner nation,” Col. Melgarejo said. “They might not have all of the equipment that we have, but they have the will and the desire to make things better and increase stability and security within their space.”last_img read more

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Coronavirus: Youth orchestra’s digital Tchaikovsky triumph

first_imgThe coronavirus pandemic has silenced many orchestras around the world. But the 70 young musicians who make up the Ulster Youth Orchestra have found a way to make themselves heard. – Advertisement – Under the supervision of Daniele Rustioni, the Ulster Orchestra’s chief conductor, they remotely recorded an ambitious piece of musical magic.The players followed Mr Rustioni’s conducting online before each individual recording was carefully patched together to create a spectacular orchestral experience. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Heat edge Lakers in thriller to keep NBA title dream alive

first_img“We got where we wanted to on offense, shared the ball like we always do,” Butler said.”This is a game of runs — I think we withstood theirs.”Butler drained two free throws with 16.8 seconds left to put Miami up by one.James, stymied under the basket, found Danny Green for a wide-open three-pointer with 7.1 seconds remaining but Green missed and Tyler Herro added two more free throws to seal it.”We got a hell of a look to win the game, to win the series,” James said. “Didn’t go down.”On a night that saw the Heat lead much of the way, Kentavious Caldwell-Pope’s three-pointer with 6:18 remaining put the Lakers up 97-96 — their first lead since the first quarter.But the Heat dug in, Duncan Robinson’s three-pointer putting Miami back up, 101-99 with 3:16 remaining, and it was a heavyweight slugfest the rest of the way, the lead changing hands seven more times.”It was all about getting stops, getting what we wanted on offense,” Butler said. “I still don’t think we rebounded the ball the way we were supposed to close out the game.”This one, it was a little bit of luck that Danny Green missed that one at the top of the key.”Duncan Robinson added 26 points for Miami. Kendrick Nunn had 14, Bam Adebayo 13, Herro 12 and Jae Crowder 11.James added 13 rebounds and seven assists for the Lakers.Anthony Davis added 28 points and Caldwell-Pope scored 16.The frantic finish was foreshadowed by a first quarter that saw eight lead changes.The tension was palpable when Los Angeles center Dwight Howard tangled with Butler and the two had to be separated less than five minutes into the contest, each receiving a technical foul.The Lakers got an early injury scare when Davis, battling Andre Iguodala for a rebound late in the first quarter, took an awkward hop and limped off the court.Lakers ‘got to be better’ The Lakers, trailing 25-24 through one quarter, said Davis had aggravated a right heel contusion. He stayed on the sideline, testing the injury as the game continued and returning in the second quarter.The Heat twice pushed their lead to 11 points in the second period, Nunn’s putback layup making it 50-39 with 3:41 left in the first half.Butler poured in 22 points in the first half on seven-of-10 shooting on the way to his second triple-double of the series.He’s just the sixth player in NBA Finals history to have multiple triple-doubles in the title series, and just the second, along with James, to have multiple 30-point triple-doubles in the same Finals.James made sure the Lakers kept it close with 21 first-half points while Davis had 13 before the break.But the Lakers’ bid for a record-equalling 17th NBA title — their first since 2010 — was at least temporarily denied.”We’ve just got to be better in game six and close the series,” James said.Topics : Jimmy Butler’s triple-double propelled Miami to a 111-108 victory over the Los Angeles Lakers on Friday that kept the Heat alive in the NBA Finals.Butler scored 35 points with 12 rebounds and 11 assists and the Heat withstood a 40-point performance from Lakers superstar LeBron James to deny Los Angeles a title-clinching win in the NBA’s quarantine bubble at Orlando.The Lakers still lead the best-of-seven series three games to two and can secure the title with a game-six victory on Sunday. Game seven, if needed, will be on Tuesday.”We’ve got two more to get,” said Butler, who played more than 47 minutes and delivered a stunning display of will and skill.”We just played hard, and just stayed with it,” said Butler, who has insisted the Heat can become just the second NBA team to rally from a 3-1 deficit to win the championship series.The only other team to do it was the James-led Cleveland Cavaliers against Golden State in 2016.last_img read more

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