Historically black church explores faith and justice in gentrified Washington,…

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Nancy Mott says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments (4) Selena Smith says: Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY July 28, 2016 at 5:22 pm Historically black Episcopal churches have a unique perspective, and I admire the people and clergy of Calvary for making an effort to start and to continue the dialogue in their community, and for providing the Church perspective to the topics covered. Rector Belleville, IL By Lynette Wilson Posted Jul 28, 2016 center_img Comments are closed. August 9, 2016 at 10:37 pm In sincerity I ask, don’t you have to talk in order to determine what to do? With limited resources, a determined focus helps. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA July 28, 2016 at 9:42 pm And Pamela Payne, I so hope it will start and continue dialog in Episcopal congregations all over the country. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tom Finlay says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Racial Justice & Reconciliation Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Historically black church explores faith and justice in gentrified Washington, D.C. Rector Smithfield, NC Pamela Payne says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Rev. Peter Jarrett-Schell, rector, and the Rev. Gayle Fisher-Stewart, associate rector, of Calvary Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C., stand for a photo under a Black Lives Matter banner. Photo: Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] The decision to display a Black Lives Matter banner above the parish hall entrance did not come easily for the leadership of Calvary Episcopal Church, a historically black church with a reputation for social justice and action on the U.S. capital’s northeast side.“Some folks have taken offense to it … and I think some people really appreciate it,” said the Rev. Peter Jarrett-Schell, Calvary’s rector, during a recent interview with Episcopal News Service. The decision was “contentious” and “not unanimous,” he said. “It’s also been an opportunity for conversation.”It’s not uncommon for Calvary to engage in discussions that challenge the congregation and the community to think and to act with an intention toward justice.Calvary has initiated conversations – contentious, difficult, provocative and otherwise – over the last two years in particular. Church leaders began talking in earnest after the police shooting of Michael Brown in August 2014 and decided to host a community-wide forum, “Ferguson: Could It Happen Here?” The forum brought together church and community members, and law enforcement officials.“It was a peaceable back-and-forth, that Ferguson can happen here given the right circumstances,” said the Rev. Gayle Fisher-Stewart, Calvary’s associate rector, and a 20-year, now retired, veteran of the D.C. Metropolitan Police. “We know that 90 percent of all civil disorders in this country have the police at their nexus; it doesn’t mean that the police caused it, but that the police were somehow involved, and it could be something fairly simple that blows up.”The Ferguson conversation led Fisher-Stewart, newly ordained a priest last November, to create the Center for the Study of Faith in Justice at Calvary with the help of a grant from the Episcopal Evangelism Society. The grant has allowed the church to host forums focused on themes related to community involvement, race and social justice: police in the community; the black church; and white spaces off limits to blacks, among others. The latter two were workshops facilitated by the Rev. Kelly Brown Douglas, the author of “Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God.”“We realized here at Calvary that we are a black congregation in a predominately white denomination and we’ve kinda had this split personality going,” said Fisher-Stewart, adding that Brown Douglas helped Calvary to redefine its call.“The black church was formed because of injustice. And so if we pick up that mantle again to do justice, which we find in the mission of Christ when he read from the scroll of Isaiah in the temple – it was about doing justice, it was about the least of these,” she said.For example, the most recent forum focused on young black males, asking the question: Are they an endangered species?“We had community organizers, activists, and psychologists, theologians, educators, to help us think about why young black males are endangered beyond the issue of policing, but also: What we are called to do to assist them in becoming the people God has called them to be?”The “what” that God has called young black males to be is something of a focus for Brittany Livingston, a 26-year-old social worker who counsels primarily middle-school-aged African-American males at an all-boys parochial school.“Most of our boys are young African-American males and it can be a challenge because I look at little brown faces every day and they often have real feelings about what’s going on,” said Livingston, adding that sometimes the violence and the overall situation makes her feel helpless. “But going in every day working with those little boys helps me. I’m working with them day-to-day and their lives matter day-to-day to me.”Members and friends of Calvary Episcopal Church participated in a “Do Justice” silent march and prayer vigil for the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives 40th annual conference in Washington, D.C., on July 20. The action was organized by the Center for the Study of Faith in Justice at Calvary. Photo: Lynette Wilson2016 has left many people feeling helpless. July has been a deadly month, both for policemen and black men in Louisiana, Minnesota and Texas. On Sunday, July 17, as members of Calvary left the church following the morning’s Eucharist, news broke of yet another deadly shooting in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, this time, a former Marine killed two policemen and a sheriff’s deputy. It was the “the juxtaposition of these deaths” that “forced the entire nation to stop and take notice,” as the Rev. Charles A. Wynder, a deacon and the Episcopal Church’s missioner for social justice and advocacy engagement, recently wrote in an essay for The Living Church.Livingston, a lifelong member of Calvary, said having a place to come to talk about it helps.“After every community forum or event that we do, something always comes out of it,” she said. “Whether it be someone coming up to you afterward and saying, ‘Hey, become a part of this mentoring program,’ or you see Rev. Gayle and my mom and the church going to protest somewhere, and then on Sundays we are praying about it, and Rev. Schell or Rev. Gayle will get up there and say something about it and so it kinda lifts that helpless feeling,” she said.Livingston’s mother, Ellen Livingston, also a social worker and Calvary leader, has witnessed rhetoric around Black Lives Matter play out in the lives of the young people she works with as well. From the white adolescent girl from a mixed neighborhood whose peers are telling her, she doesn’t belong: “This young lady is trying to deal with something far greater than what she can imagine,” said Livingston. To the young black child who attends a predominantly white summer camp at a prestigious private school where he was targeted by white students: “ ‘So black lives matter,’ and he was being bullied, ‘your life doesn’t matter any more than mine, all our lives matter.’ ”The Black Lives Matter movement, like the Center for the Study of Faith and Justice at Calvary, was born in 2013 out of tragedy, this time with the acquittal of George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch coordinator who shot 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in a gated community just north of Orlando, Florida. The movement grew out of the Twitter hashtag #BlackLivesMatter, calling attention to police and vigilante violence against black Americans.In making the decision to hang the “Black Lives Matter” banner, it came down to the church’s responsibility as a Christian congregation, said Jarrett-Schell.“The Gospel declares that all lives matter, but in this moment right now we see in the eyes of the world and our society, not all lives matter equally and black lives are undervalued and that’s putting it mildly,” Jarrett-Schell said. “We as Christians if we truly believe that the Gospel brings good news for all people, and we look and we see that there’s a group of people in our immediate neighborhood and our society, particularly black people, who are not being treated as children of God, the way they should be, then we have to bear witness to that specifically.”Calvary’s matriarch, a woman described as making space for everyone, initially opposed the Black Lives Matter banner out of concern for what people coming to the church would think. But after walking beneath it a few times, Jarrett-Schell said, she realized the banner says that her life matters and that if someone disagrees they don’t need to come to the church.The Black Lives Matter movement follows the Occupy movement, another grassroots movement that began in New York in 2011, seeking social and economic equality. Just as Occupy took laid bare the worldwide problem of social and economic inequality, Black Lives has brought racism into everyday conversation.“When we look at the problem (racism) in national and international terms, it just seems too big for us to do anything,” said Jarrett-Schell, when asked if some of the most significant change happens at the community level. “And when we look at history, these big turning points, these moments when the arc of history has actually bent toward justice, the apex moment, but we ignore the fact that there has always been years and years of grassroots community work that actually made the big national moment possible.”An already tense presidential election has been made more tense as race relations linger in American’s minds; support for Black Lives Matter, an often-misunderstood movement, runs the spectrum. Yet violence against black Americans is nothing new. Nonblack Americans first saw it broadcast in their living rooms with the beating of Rodney King at the hands of Los Angeles police officers in 1991; it dominated the social commentary in the lyrics of early hip hop music. Smartphones equipped with video cameras have upped the frequency in which police violence has been documented and shared publicly.The Los Angeles police chief called King’s beating an aberration, but the black community and law enforcement officials knew better.“[We said] ‘the aberration’ was that it was caught on film because it happens every day in America,” said Fisher-Stewart, it’s just now that everyone has cell phones. “Now anyone can take out their phone and record what has been going on forever in terms of policing in America.“The crisis has always been there; it’s ever-present now with technology.”Calvary Episcopal Church hosted an exhibit of 200 T-shirts bearing the name, date of birth and date of death of victims of violence crime in the D.C.-metropolitan area. Photo: Gayle Fisher-StewartLong before the church decided to display the Black Lives Matter banner, they hosted an exhibit of more than 200 T-shirts bearing the name, date of birth and date of death of victims of violence crime in the D.C.-metropolitan area. The exhibit, organized by Heeding God’s Call, called on visitors to pray for each individual who had died. The church now is working on a new conversation series, ranging from youth and engaging with the police force to education beyond high school, entrepreneurship and male-female relationships.It’s impossible to have a conversation about police violence and black males without the conversation eventually turning to racism, both cultural and institutional, marginalization and economic inequality. Moreover, forums and the conversations at Calvary are taking place under the backdrop of gentrification.“We are a commuter church, our community is beginning to look nothing like it did when we were kids,” said Ellen Livingston, who grew up a 10- to 15-minute walk from the church and later moved to the suburbs. “This (church) was a community center at one time, and our community is changing, and the gentrification and the isolation and the marginalization of those who are black and have remained in the city, so we want to provide support for them, as well.”Calvary Episcopal Church, a historically black church in Washington, D.C., is located on the city’s gentrified northeast side. Just down the block, at the corner of H Street and Sixth Street NE, Apollo Apartments, anchored by a Whole Foods Market, is under construction on the former site of the historic Apollo Theater. Photo: Lynette WilsonLocated one block off H Street, once the commercial heart of black Washington, D.C., a street that burned during the violent protests that followed the assassination of the Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the church, established as a mission church in a storefront in 1901, now is faced with holding tight to its identity in a gentrified, rapidly changing neighborhood. Once referred to as the “Chocolate City,” the nation’s capital has gone from having a 70 percent African-American majority a generation ago to less than 50 percent black today.“H Street was predominantly black, it was like the downtown for black folks, and it burned, the riots, it burned, just like some portions of Seventh Street, U Street burned, portions of it, the black areas of the city, were the ones that burned, and so it has taken a while for them to totally come back, and as they’ve come back, they’ve come back gentrified,” said Fisher-Stewart.“We are like many of the historically black congregations in D.C. that are surrounded by people who don’t look like us, but we still need to reach out and spread the Gospel to them.”The community’s gentrification is beginning to change the church’s mission. Every third Thursday of the month Calvary hosts a meeting to talk about community changes, such as a massive apartment building anchored by a Whole Foods Market under construction on the corner of northeast Sixth and H streets in what used to be the site the historic Apollo Theater. Other changes are less obvious to newcomers and visitors.“I was driving in this morning – I was coming out West Virginia Avenue by Gallaudet University – and I noticed on the west side of the street where there used to be no sidewalk, just a pathway, there’s now a sidewalk there … that’s where I used to live, I used to live off West Virginia Avenue – there was never any sidewalk on that side of the street. You couldn’t walk on that side of the street unless you walked out in the street but now there’s a sidewalk there – and that’s 50 years,” said Kevin Douglas, a longtime member who grew up within walking distance of the church.There’s no shortage of churches in the immediate neighborhood, nearby a tiny Christian storefront church on H Street identified only with a cross is surrounded by restaurants, juice bars, yoga studios and a boutique selling pet supplies. Calvary’s congregation skews older and female; the vibrant youth group, one of the largest African-American church youth groups in the city, of Brittany Livingston’s childhood, is long gone.“As much as many of our members have moved away, all of our members have a great affection for this neighborhood, even as it is changing rapidly,” said Jarrett-Schell, who in 2012 became the church’s first white rector. “We are looking to be a congregation that shares the Good News of Christ in this particular place and in this particular neighborhood.“We do have a lot of new families moving in and that is really complicated for Calvary … there’s opportunity there, but there is also a great deal of loss, displacement going on. So when we say share the Good News, obviously we are talking in spiritual and temporal terms, there’s a message of hope that the Gospel offers and we want the people in the neighborhood to hear it. There are expectations and social responsibilities that hope; we want the people of this neighborhood to hear about that as well, and we want Calvary to be a place that shares that.”­– Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service.  New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA August 5, 2016 at 8:40 pm Dialogue: an interesting concept. Death of innocents cannot wait for dialogue.Action is needed beyond dialoguelast_img read more

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Leeds University presents matched giving campaign results as infographic

first_img Tagged with: alumni Individual giving infographic Research / statistics Howard Lake | 2 November 2011 | News  97 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The infographic includes the total of course, but also splits the income by the decade in which the alumni graduated from Leeds. By far the most donations were received from those who had graduated in the current decade, followed by those who had donated in the 1990s.The infographic was created by designers Appetite.Have you presented the results of a fundraising appeal in this format? Similar if more basic presentations have appeared in charity annual reports over the years covering total income, but the use of infographics to demonstrate impact and thank donors is surely in its infancy at present.www.alumni.leeds.ac.uk Leeds University’s Alumni & Development Team have presented the results of their matched giving campaign in infographic form.The Big Match appeal ran from 2008 to 2011 to take advantage of the Government’s Matched Giving Fund for Universities. Every £3 donated by alumni was worth £4 to the university, or £5 if it was given using Gift Aid.The results in graphical form are a thank you to the donors who gave. Adrian Salmon, Footsteps Fund Manager at Leeds University, told UK Fundraising that the image will appear on the back cover of the next donor newsletter. Advertisementcenter_img Leeds University presents matched giving campaign results as infographic AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Beijing Olympics human rights campaign launched

first_img China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison June 1, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Beijing Olympics human rights campaign launched News Organisation RSF_en Receive email alerts News April 27, 2021 Find out more Political scientist Li Xiaorong said the Games were an excellent opportunity to improve the human rights situation in China. “The record is miserable and repression is increasing all the time, with the Games providing a new excuse for a crackdown,” she said.Wangpo Bashi, of the Tibet Office, deplored China’s continuing torture of prisoners of conscience.The Collectif made eight demands:1. Free everyone who has been in prison since the 1989 Tiananmen protests, as well as all prisoners of conscience.2. End control of the media, including the Internet.3. Suspend all executions in China pending abolition of the death penalty.4. Abolish the practice of administrative detention.5. End the routine use of torture.6. Allow free and independent trade unions.7. Abolish article 306 of the criminal code, which allows lawyers to be arrested or banned from working.8. End evictions from land and housing.The Collectif has set up a blog ( http://pekin2008.rsfblog.org ) which presents (in French) its proposals and allows people to sign a letter to Chinese President Hu Jintao calling for action. It also plans to approach all French sports federations, as well as athletes and politicians.It is holding a rally on Sunday 3 June at Trocadéro Square in Paris at 15:30 to commemorate the Tiananmen Square repression of 4 June 1989.The Collectif includes: Action des chrétiens pour l’abolition de la torture (ACAT-France), Agir pour les droits de l’Homme (ADH), Amnesty International (AI-France), the Comité de soutien au peuple tibétain CSPT), Ensemble contre la peine de mort (ECPM), the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), the Ligue des Droits de l’Homme (LDH), Reporters Without Borders and Solidarité Chine. Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes Help by sharing this information Nine French and international organisations, grouped in the French Collectif Chine JO 2008, today announced an eight-point campaign to improve human rights in China, which is hosting the Olympic Games in Beijing next year.Marie Holzman, president of Solidarité Chine, speaking for the Collectif, said the campaign was “peaceful and rational,” in the words of the rebellious students in China in 1989. She noted that China’s leaders had made promises, including one by a member of the Chinese committee seeking to win the Games for Beijing, who said in 2001 that awarding the event to China would “help the growth of human rights.”Former French justice minister Robert Badinter called on the Chinese government at a press conference in Paris to respect the ideals of peace and justice symbolised by the Games and to exclude all acts of violence, notably suspension of all executions and death sentences. to go further ChinaAsia – Pacific China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures ChinaAsia – Pacific News News Follow the news on China June 2, 2021 Find out more March 12, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Centre Authorises States To Notify Orders Under Essential Commodities Act Without Its Prior Concurrence Until June 30, Amid Lockdown [Read Press Release]

first_imgNews UpdatesCentre Authorises States To Notify Orders Under Essential Commodities Act Without Its Prior Concurrence Until June 30, Amid Lockdown [Read Press Release] Akshita Saxena7 April 2020 11:55 PMShare This – xThe Union Ministry of Consumer Affairs on Wednesday authorized the States/ Union Territories to notify orders under the Essential Commodities Act, 1955, by relaxing the requirement of “prior concurrence” of the Central Government, up to June 30, 2020. The decision has been taken to narrow down the chain of command and forthwith ensure smooth supply of essential items in…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Union Ministry of Consumer Affairs on Wednesday authorized the States/ Union Territories to notify orders under the Essential Commodities Act, 1955, by relaxing the requirement of “prior concurrence” of the Central Government, up to June 30, 2020. The decision has been taken to narrow down the chain of command and forthwith ensure smooth supply of essential items in the country. Intimating the same, Union Home Secretary wrote to all the State Chief Secretaries, asking them to take urgent steps to ensure wide availability of essential goods at fair prices, by invoking provisions of the Essential Commodities (EC) Act 1955. It was highlighted that due to loss of production in face of the lockdown, the menace of hoarding and black marketeering may proliferate. Thus, the state governments have been asked to take apposite measures, including fixing of stock limits, capping of prices, enhancing production, inspection of accounts of dealers and other such actions. “There have been reports of loss of production due to various factors, especially reduction in labour supply. In this situation, there is a possibility of inventory building/hoarding and black marketing, profiteering, and speculative trading, resulting in price rise of essential goods. The States have been asked to take urgent steps to ensure availability of these commodities at fair prices for public at large,” a press release issued in this behalf by the Ministry of Home Affairs states. The Central government is empowered under Section 2A of the Essential Commodities Act to declare a commodity as an “essential commodity”, to ensure its equitable distribution and availability at fair prices. It has the power to regulate the production, supply, distribution, etc., of essential commodities under Section 3 of the Act, or to delegate such powers to the State government under Section 5 (as done in the present case). Violation of any direction made under the Act is a cognizable offence which may attract a penalty of imprisonment up to 7 years. It may also be noted that earlier, the Central Government had allowed manufacture/production, transport and other related supply-chain activities in respect of essential goods like foodstuff, medicines and medical equipment. Read Press Release Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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Calls for Inishowen to be brought under investment spotlight

first_img Twitter Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Pinterest By News Highland – July 17, 2019 Twitter Google+ FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Facebook Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th WhatsAppcenter_img The Cathaoirleach of the Inishowen Municipal District says more needs to be done to attract investment to the peninsula. It follows a presentation to councillors in the area on Donegal Connect, which is being coordinated by the Donegal Diaspora Initiative.The initiative is inviting people who have moved away from the county to consider coming home, with a video produced to highlight the employment and investment opportunities that exist in the county.However, Cllr Martin Mcdermott says there are no such opportunities being highlighted in Inishowen……..Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Martincdfgdfgdfgdonnect1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR DL Debate – 24/05/21 Calls for Inishowen to be brought under investment spotlight AudioHomepage BannerNews Facebook Previous articleLevel of growth in hotel sector at lowest point in seven yearsNext articleStaff objections delaying full abortion services at LUH News Highland Google+ Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic last_img read more

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20 new Council houses in Stranorlar officially let to tenants

first_img DL Debate – 24/05/21 20 new Council houses in Stranorlar officially let to tenants Google+ Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Previous article“We are pursuing criminal assets in Donegal” CAB tells JPCNext article“Is it a bird? Is it a plane?” Well… they don’t actually know! News Highland Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook Twitter Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA center_img Google+ By News Highland – November 12, 2018 Over 20 new Council houses in Stranorlar have been officially let to tenants today.Gleann Na Grainne, a housing estate comprising of 21 dwellings is a turnkey development and is the first of its kind in the Stranorlar area for a number of years.Cathaoirleach of the Stranorlar Municipal District Cllr Patrick McGowan says this will help to ease the local housing waiting list considerably:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/pmg1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Twitter WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR AudioHomepage BannerNewslast_img read more

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Disappointment locally over retrofitting grant

first_img WhatsApp Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA DL Debate – 24/05/21 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter A Donegal councillor has hit out at the government over its commitment to the ongoing retrofitting programme for social housing.Speaking after a meeting of the Housing Strategic Policy Committee, Cllr Gerry Mc Monagle says he’s very disappointed with the latest grant received from Department of Housing.He says in recent years, the council has retro fitted almost 3,000 homes, which included wall and attic insulation.However, he says while the new Government Programme is focussed on moving to replacing windows and doors, the amount will only allow the council do 45 houses:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/gerrymac.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Pinterest WhatsApp By News Highland – March 4, 2021 Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Google+center_img AudioHomepage BannerNews Disappointment locally over retrofitting grant Facebook Google+ Previous articleNumber of people with Covid in hospital continues to fallNext articleSeveral Fianna Fail TD’s strongly criticise pace of vaccination programme News Highland News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Facebook Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Pinterest Twitterlast_img read more

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UVU Athletics Reaches New Heights With Revenue, Awards

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailOREM, Utah-Last Friday, the Utah Valley University Athletics’ external operations department celebrated a year with unprecedented success.These achievements included earning record-breaking revenue and obtaining a record-number of national awards in 2017-18.For the fourth consecutive year, the department recorded new revenue records of overall financial contributions .This also includes record numbers in annual fundraising and corporate partnerships.This is primarily because of the athletic department’s relationship with Utah Community Credit Union for the naming rights to UCCU Ballpark, the home stadium for the Wolverines’ baseball program.The department also saw improvement in earnings from VIP packages for the men’s basketball program.This entailed courtside seating and the “Toughest 24” trip featuring games at powerhouses Kentucky and Duke on successive nights last November.Furthermore, the department reached new heights in ticket sales, finishing with a revenue increase of 101 percent from the total amount in 2017-18.This also topped the previous year’s increase of 69 percent.Additionally, the UVU Athletics Sports Information and marketing offices each received national recognition from the College Sports Information Directors of America and the National Association of Collegiate Marketing Administrations for their publications in 2017-18.Finally, the UVU Athletic marketing crew earned the fan engagement award for its men’s basketball final media timeout promotions at the squad’s home game during the 2017-18 season. Brad James Tags: Marketing/Sports Information/Utah Community Credit Union/UVU Athletics July 16, 2018 /Sports News – Local UVU Athletics Reaches New Heights With Revenue, Awardslast_img read more

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USS Hawaii Holds Change of Command Ceremony

first_imgThe warrior spear was passed to a new commanding officer at a change of command ceremony for the Virginia-class submarine USS Hawaii (SSN 776) at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, March 1.Cmdr. Stephen G. Mack, commanding officer of Hawaii, was relieved by Cmdr. William A. Patterson.The ceremony’s guest speaker, former governor of Hawaii and ship’s sponsor, Linda Lingle, praised Mack for his exceptional performance while in command of Hawaii.“Congratulations Cmdr. Mack. You will always have a special place in my heart and in the heart of the people of Hawaii,” said Lingle.Mack said he is proud of having the opportunity to command Hawaii and working with some fantastic Sailors.“These are the shipmates who sailed safely well over 120,000 nautical miles while I was in command. These are the warriors who deployed our ship to the Western Pacific executing all assigned tasking as we completed the first WESTPAC for the Virginia class and the second six-month deployment for the war canoe,” said Mack. “They are the reason Hawaii has done so well while I was fortunate enough to be a part of this team.”Mack took the time to praise and thank many members of his crew, from the most senior officer to the newest seaman. He made various comments about how Hawaii is a special boat with an equally gifted crew. He said he was fortunate to serve on this fine ship named after the beautiful island home so rich in cultural and military history.Following Mack’s speech, he passed on the ceremonial Hawaiian warrior spear to Patterson.As Patterson assumed command of Hawaii, he thanked Mack for turning over a great ship and an even greater crew.“This warship represents the confluence of two of history’s strongest warfighting mariner traditions: the Hawaiian warrior and the United States submarine force. Steve has done a great job bringing the two traditions together to improve the ship. Steve, thank you for a great ship,” said Patterson.Hawaii is the first commissioned vessel of its name. The submarine was named to recognize the tremendous support the Navy has enjoyed from the people and state of Hawaii, and in honor of the rich heritage of submarines in the Pacific.“The war canoe is a like an Ihe Koa – a warrior spear – pointing west, ready to throw us into the fight with our island chain trailing off behind the ship,” said Mack.During the ceremony, Mack received the Legion of Merit award for his performance as the commanding officer of Hawaii from January 2010 to March 2013.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, March 5, 2013; Image: US Navy View post tag: USS View post tag: News by topic View post tag: holds USS Hawaii Holds Change of Command Ceremony View post tag: Ceremony View post tag: Hawaii View post tag: Navy View post tag: Defence View post tag: Naval March 5, 2013 View post tag: change Authorities View post tag: Defense View post tag: Command Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Hawaii Holds Change of Command Ceremony Share this articlelast_img read more

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Dave Schools & Holly Bowling Join Tom Hamilton’s American Babies At Sweetwater [Full Show Video]

first_imgLast night, Tom Hamilton’s American Babies took the stage at Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley, CA as part of their “Masquerade of Light + Dark” fall tour, where the band pay tribute to a different artist or group each night. Previous performances have seen has seen Hamilton and co. pay tribute to artists including David Bowie and The Beatles. This weekend’s double-nighter in the Bay Area included music of the Grateful Dead, with Bob Weir joining for an extended sit-in the previous night.The Saturday night performance included Dave Schools of Widespread Panic and the inimitable Holly Bowling, with incredible covers of “Shakedown Street,” “Tangled Up In Blue”, and more. Thanks to Chris from Jam Buzz, you can watch the full performance below:Hamilton, Weir, and Schools will join forces with Bill Kreutzmann and Jeff Chimenti this February to headline the Los Muertos Con Queso event in Mexico, and they have been rehearsing in California all week. This weekend served as a very special preview of this unique lineup!last_img read more

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