Dixie State Volleyball Standouts Receive RMAC Sports Weekly Awards

first_img Written by September 17, 2018 /Sports News – Local Dixie State Volleyball Standouts Receive RMAC Sports Weekly Awards Tags: Adams State/Colorado Mesa/Dixie State University Student Activities Center/Dixie State Volleyball/Fort Lewis/Lauren Gammell/Megan Treanor/Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference/Western State FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailST. GEORGE, Utah-Monday, Dixie State volleyball received two of the three Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference weekly awards as they improved to 4-0 in conference play with wins over Western State and Colorado MesaMegan Treanor, a 6-1 sophomore right setter/hitter out of Salem, Utah and Salem Hills High School was named as the conference offensive player of the week. She averaged 16.5 kills, 12.5 assists, 4.5 digs and 3.5 blocks, while combining to hit .491 in the wins over the Mountaineers and Mavericks.Lauren Gammell, a 6-2 junior right side hitter/middle blocker out of Spanish Fork, Utah and Spanish Fork High School, was named as the conference defensive player of the week for the second time in the past three weeks.In the wins over the Mountaineers and Mavericks, Gammell averaged 10.0 blocks and 9.5 kills per match while hitting .531 overall.Dixie State seeks to remain perfect in conference play this week as they face Fort Lewis and Adams State Friday and Saturday at the Dixie State University Student Activities Center. Brad Jameslast_img read more

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Industry first? Meet the agent allowing tech to book all his rental viewings

first_imgA large estate agency renting out over 40 properties a month is taking the unusual step of turning off its telephones and emails to inbound property rental viewing leads and handling them via an automated online booking system.Major Cardiff agency Jeffrey Ross is believed to be the first traditional high street firm to take this route, which is being achieved by using the Homehere.co tech platform.The four-branch estate agency is one of the firms trialling the Homehere.co platform in the UK ahead of its soft launch later this year.It enables agents to engage directly with all of their inbound lettings leads form the portals and let prospective tenants book their own slots to view each property after filling in a pre-qualification questionnaire.“Although it seems like a big jump, the public expects to be able to book appointments online, think airbnb or booking.com. Taking bookings over the phone is actually old fashioned,” says Elliott Hoopernash Director of Jeffrey Ross (pictured, above).“I think there’s a misconception good customer service has to be over the phone. Our approach using homehere means the process is more consistent as enquirers are engaged immediately and encouraged to book in for a viewing time that has been set up by us, after they have qualified.”‘Jeffrey Ross has always prided ourselves on trying new technology that improves the customer experience and makes us more efficient.”Cardiff connectionHomehere.co was launched two years ago by former Cardiff student lettings agent Lou Quinn (pictured, below) with tech expert and angel investor John Curley, and claims to help agencies achieve 80% of their revenues even in difficult markets.Quinn says the agency already uses his tech to handle 80% of inbound leads but that the decision has been taken to go the whole hog in the next few weeks, and also handle its website leads later on too.“So many leads are lost when they’re handled manually – whereas with our system a letting agent can go out of the office and come back to find all the viewings automatically booked for them,” says Quinn.Hoopernash adds: “When we started using homehere to schedule viewings I was sceptical as to how popular it would be, but the uptake from enquirers has been incredible. We’re now taking over 80% of our bookings online via homehere rather than over the phone.“This is saving us hours on inefficient labour and providing a great experience for customers and staff alike.”Visit homehere.coLou Quinn Homehere.co Jeffrey Ross Cardiff September 9, 2020Nigel Lewis3 commentsAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 9th September 2020 at 7:11 pmKnowing the Homehere team Lou Quinn and John Curley, and as importantly their super efficient solution, built around the needs of working agents, and in collaboration with them, they are a model of how technology, automates boring repetitive processes that machines can do faster and more effectively. Giving the hardworking sales teams quality time to plan strategy and move businesses forward.The fourth technological revolution is not all about 100M rounds of funding, it is the effective solutions at grassroots that deliver huge savings and drive big profits. Agencies embracing the correct digital solutions built around their specific needs – is the future, and I guarantee from experience that Lou & John do not blind agents with science, they just quietly solve problems.Log in to ReplyJohn Socha, Orchard BMS Ltd Orchard BMS Ltd 9th September 2020 at 12:57 pmLovely idea.Only flaw in the “Cunning Plan” is the humans.I booked an appointment for 5.30pm yesterday.The rule is, if you do not call 30 minutes before an appointment, we do not attend.Sure enough, no call and we did not attend.No irate email or call. Why?Members of the public feel that we have nothing better to do with our time. That is why lots of landlords use agents to find tenants.A long hard look at the time wasted will give the employers a much better perspective of what is actually going on.This is not the Nirvana that all the “Spin” is suggesting, only due to us dealing with people.Log in to ReplyAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 9th September 2020 at 9:09 amKnowing the Homehere team Lou Quinn and John Curley, and as importantly their super efficient solution, built around the needs of working agents, and in collaboration with them, they are a model of how technology, automates boring repetitive processes that machines can do faster and more effectively. Giving the hardworking sales teams quality time to plan strategy and move businesses forward.The fourth technological revolution is not all about 100M rounds of funding, it is the effective solutions at grassroots that deliver huge savings and drive big profits. Agencies embracing the correct digital solutions built around their specific needs – is the future, and I guarantee from experience that Lou & John do not blind agents with science, they just quietly solve problems.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Industry first? Meet the agent allowing tech to book all his rental viewings previous nextProptechIndustry first? Meet the agent allowing tech to book all his rental viewingsFour-branch estate agency Jeffrey Ross is believed to be the first high street firm in the UK to process viewing bookings entirely online.Nigel Lewis9th September 20203 Comments1,261 Viewslast_img read more

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Purdue head coaches volunteering to take pay cut

first_img (Photo supplied/Purdue University) Coaches at Purdue University are volunteering to take a pay cut.The school announced Tuesday that the four highest-paid employees of the athletic department — football coach Jeff Brohm, men’s basketball coach Matt Painter, women’s basketball coach Sharon Versyp and AD Mike Bobinski — have taken a 20% reduction in salary, to help the department, as it deals with a $50 million shortfall due to fall sports being postponed.The Journal & Courier reports other coaches are taking a 15% paycut to their salaries.Brohm, Painter, Versyp and Bobinski, along with other coaches and senior administrators, have also announced they are pledging $1 million to the “More Than a Game” fundraiser on Purdue Day of Giving on Sept. 9. WhatsApp Purdue head coaches volunteering to take pay cut CoronavirusIndianaLocalNewsSports By Network Indiana – August 25, 2020 0 288 Google+ Pinterest WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Twitter Google+ Twitter Facebook Previous articleSouth Bend man accused of killing puppy scheduled for courtNext articleSecond teenager dead after being pulled from Lake Michigan Network Indianalast_img read more

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Thundercat Shares New Single “Friend Zone” Off Upcoming Album [Listen]

first_imgLast week, Thundercat announced the impending release of his new album, Drunk, via Flying Lotus’ eclectic Brainfeeder record label on February 24th. He also released the first single from the new release, a smooth R&B/funk jam with a pair of out-of-left-field guests, Kenny Loggins and Michael McDonald.Thundercat Announces New Album “Drunk,” Releases Single With Kenny Loggins And Michael McDonald [Listen]Today, the eclectic bassist, producer, and vocalist shared the second new song from Drunk, “Friend Zone.” The track starts with a spicy synth vamp, layered with the familiar sound of an iPhone alarm, perfectly synced to the intro’s rhythm, before dropping into the arpeggiated theme of the beat. Thundercat’s distinctive bass sound, reminiscent of his substantial work on Kendrick Lamar‘s fantastic 2015 album To Pimp A Butterfly, bolsters the funky track, before it finally fades away, as if evaporating into thin air.You can stream the new track below:Thundercat began his 2017 world tour last night with the first of two performances at The Independent in San Francisco. For a full list of upcoming dates, head here.[h/t – Pitchfork]last_img read more

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2 firefighters among 4 people killed in Oklahoma house fire

first_imgWAYNOKA, Okla. (AP) — Two Oklahoma firefighters are among four people killed in an early morning house fire in northwestern Oklahoma. Assistant Oklahoma State Fire Marshal James Fullingim says the blaze reported was just after 3 a.m. Friday in Waynoka, about 110 miles northwest of Oklahoma City. Fullingim says the fire was reported by a person reportedly trapped in a bedroom of the home. He says two firefighters entered the home and found a man and woman inside, but all died as they were trying to escape. Fullingim says exactly what happened inside the home and the cause of the fire has not been determined.last_img read more

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Humongous produce

first_imgBy Sharon DowdyUniversity of GeorgiaGrowing gigantic award-winning watermelons and pumpkins takes skill, patience and time. Young gardeners across the state are encouraged to plant their seeds now if they plan to win either the annual Georgia 4-H Pumpkin or Watermelon Growing Contest this year. Gaining knowledge and winning moneyThe Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association sponsors both contests. First place gets $100. Second and third receive $50 and $25 respectively. The first 50 entrants to each contest receive a contest T-shirt. The goal of the contests is to get Georgia students interested in agriculture and in growing their own crops, said Lindsey Fodor, a Georgia 4-H program assistant and the contests’ coordinator.Any watermelon variety may be grown, but University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts highly recommend the Carolina Cross variety.Monica Walden of Grady County won first place in the 2008 watermelon contest. Her Carolina Cross melon weighed in at 127-pounds.When it comes to growing pumpkins, UGA experts suggest growing varieties like Atlantic Giant, Big Max, Big Moon, Prizewinner and Connecticut Field. All of the 2008 winners grew Atlantic Giant pumpkins. Carroll County 4-H’er Matthew Adams made Georgia 4-H history in 2007 when he won the pumpkin contest with a record-setting 580.8-pound pumpkin. He didn’t break his record in 2008, but he still won first place with a 468.8-pound pumpkin.Weighed by county agentsTo enter, a 4-H’er must grow the watermelon or pumpkin and have it weighed by their local UGA Extension agent. The deadline for watermelon contest submissions is Aug. 1. The pumpkin contest deadline is Oct. 1.The top three state winners for each contest are required to submit a photo of themselves with their humongous harvest. Information about the contests, including photos of the past winners, can be found online at www.georgia4h.org/public/edops/nationalfair/pumpkincontest/.last_img read more

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Merrick Woman Charged With Fatal Hit-and-run

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Merrick woman was arrested for allegedly killing a pedestrian in a hit-and-run crash in Freeport over the Independence Day weekend, Nassau County police said.Stephanie Beeker was charged with leaving the scene of an accident with death.Police said the 66-year-old woman was driving a Nissan Altima eastbound on Sunrise Highway when she hit an unidentified male who was crossing Route 27 west of Buffalo Avenue at 11 p.m. July 4. She reportedly kept on driving.The victim was taken to Nassau University Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead a half hour later.Police apprehended the suspect in Baldwin about 90 minutes later.Bail for Beeker was set at $10,000 cash or $20,000 bond. She is due back in court Wednesday.last_img read more

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Pass the ‘SCRUB Act,’ NAFCU urges House

first_imgNAFCU Vice President of Legislative Affairs Brad Thaler urged the leaders of the House to approve H.R. 1155, the NAFCU-supported “Searching for and Cutting Regulations that are Unnecessarily Burdensome (SCRUB) Act.”The bill would establish a review process for regulations and identify those that should be repealed or amended to reduce unnecessary regulatory burdens throughout the government. The bill was introduced by Rep. Jason Smith, R-Mo.“The magnitude of the regulatory burden facing credit unions is immense and continuously growing,” Thaler wrote. “Many credit unions are struggling to keep pace with the compliance burden placed on them by multiple regulators, which is evident in the reduction of credit unions. The total number of credit unions has declined by 17% (more than 1,280 institutions) since the 2nd quarter of 2010; 96% were smaller institutions with assets of less than $100 million.”Thaler continued, “Credit unions are often forced to merge or simply shut their doors as a result of an inability to cope with regulatory burdens. While credit unions were not the cause of the financial crisis, they are still subject to the CFPB and many regulations intended for those that did.” continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Bon appetit, credit unions!

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Brian Hague Brian has more than 25 years’ experience in financial institutions and the capital markets, and has devoted 21 years to serving credit unions through various roles at CNBS, LLC, a … Web: www.rochdaleparagon.com Details It’s that time of year again, when many of us pledge to live a healthier lifestyle. In order to do that, we need to plan our meals according to our appetite – not for how much we can eat, but for how much we should eat in order to avoid the consequences of overdoing it.Likewise, to ensure the health of our credit union, we have to not only assess and measure the amount of risk we take, we have to know how much risk we’re willing to take in the first place. In other words, what is our appetite for risk?Risk appetite is the amount of risk we’re willing to accept in pursuit of our strategic objectives. Assessing risk appetite is a critical first step that will guide our enterprise risk management (ERM) and strategic planning efforts at a broad level, and our daily activity at a more narrow level. Our appetite for risk will shape our decisions and actions, align organizational performance, and identify inconsistencies within our decisions and actions.By its nature, risk appetite is strategic, while risk tolerance – the application of our risk appetite to our operations – is tactical. Risk tolerance is generally stated in terms of the metrics we use to measure performance, as either a specific target level or a range of acceptable outcomes. For example, if part of our risk appetite is a general unwillingness to let capital levels fall below targeted levels, even temporarily, we might see a relatively high minimum threshold, or a tight range, for our net worth ratio. The cost of that will probably be some foregone strategic opportunities that would require capital investments, but it’s important to be true to our risk appetite.Figure 1 below illustrates risk appetite within the broader context of the universe of all possible risks, and our capacity for risk, which is a function of our capital and the regulatory landscape. As a credit union, there are some risks we simply can’t take, so our risk capacity is narrower than the risk universe. However, there are some risks that we could take that we might not want to take. That attitude toward risk defines our risk appetite, which will be narrower still than our risk capacity. Note also that by avoiding a certain level of negative outcomes, we give up some level of positive outcomes; such is the nature of the risk/return tradeoff.How do we apply risk appetite in a strategic planning context? First, let’s consider the typical outcome of the planning exercise. We begin with where we are today, and we cast a vision for where we want to be at some point in the future. Then, we need to create a “road map” of how we’re going to get there: our strategic objectives. Risk appetite provides the boundaries of that road. If the things we’d need to do to achieve our objectives would violate our risk appetite, we need to either re-think where we want to be in the future, or come up with a way to get there that won’t fall outside our appetite for risk.Given that risk appetite guides our organizational performance, then, how do we assess it in the first place? We at The Rochdale Group conduct an online survey of management and the board, asking 22 questions across five general areas of a credit union’s operations. Each question assesses the respondent’s willingness to assume risk by doing a certain thing within each of those areas. The response is based on a scale from one to ten, with one representing a strong unwillingness to assume risk, a ten indicating a strong commitment to assume risk, and a five indicating an average willingness to assume risk for each question. The surveys are typically anonymous, but each group (management or board) is identified.Armed with the results, we graph the distribution of responses to each question from each of the two groups – management or board – showing the mean and plus or minus one standard deviation. Then we line up the management and board graphs for each question to identify the degree to which the two groups are aligned in their attitudes toward risk. In some cases, the alignment is very strong, and in others, there is greater variation between management’s and the board’s risk appetite, but common ground can typically be identified as we facilitate a discussion of the results.Finally, we draft a series of risk appetite statements for each of the five areas covered under the survey that describe, in general terms, how much risk the credit union is willing to take in that area, guided by the questions asked. These statements are strategic in focus; think of them as mission statements for risk. Those statements will then drive the metrics we select for each of those areas as risk tolerances, to ensure that we don’t violate our risk appetite.It’s critical to engage the board in this exercise. Using an analogy similar to our strategic “roadmap” discussed earlier, the board’s job is to place the curbs on the track, while management’s job is to run the race. And the value of the exercise is obvious: as executives, we want to know whether our board is highly risk-averse, or more aggressive in their willingness to assume risk. And directors should want to know whether they’re potentially holding the credit union back, or whether management is. Both groups will be interested to see how well aligned they are (or not!). We typically find that the strongest alignment is found in credit unions whose management has already done a thorough job of educating the board regarding risk.A few important considerations are in order. First and foremost, risk is not a bad thing for credit unions. We are in the risk-taking business. By definition, as financial intermediaries, our role is to intermediate risks on behalf of our members that they themselves are unwilling or unable to take. If we don’t do that, we don’t bring value to our members. The key is to know how much risk we’re willing to assume in the pursuit of serving them.Second, it’s important to re-visit risk appetite periodically. We recommend the appetite statements be reviewed annually, preferably at the beginning of each strategic planning session, and that they be validated or revised as appropriate. It isn’t necessary to repeat the survey process more than about every three years.Finally, while the risk appetite may change as market conditions, the regulatory landscape, the composition of the board, or of management undergo changes, we must avoid “appetite creep.” This occurs when we change the risk appetite (usually toward a greater willingness to assume risk) because we’re approaching the limit of the risk tolerance used to ensure we don’t violate that aspect of our risk appetite. For example, we might have a limit on the amount of mortgage risk we’re willing to assume, measured using an upper limit of 600% of capital in first mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities. If we move that limit to 700% just because the actual ratio hit 590% and we want to keep making mortgage loans, that’s appetite creep.A person trying to eat healthy must first and foremost understand his or her appetite, in terms of what they can eat in order to attain their health goals, vs. what they’d like to eat. Likewise, credit unions must understand their risk appetite before engaging in the risk-taking activities that define their purpose in serving their members. Total risk-aversion is neither possible nor strategically sound for credit unions, but neither is gluttony advisable. As a former colleague once said, “The greedy become the needy.”For more information regarding risk appetite assessment, please contact the author at [email protected] or 913.890.8022.last_img read more

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The merger effect: Protected balances

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr A couple weeks ago, we blogged on a few FAQs related to mergers. As it continues to baffle those of you out there dealing with mergers, today’s blog expands on the last FAQ – converting a credit card portfolio post-merger. For a refresher, here’s the scenario:Kenosha Credit Union merges into Point Place Federal Credit Union. Kenosha CU had a credit card plan that Point Place FCU does not want to continue administering. Point Place FCU wants to encourage members with this credit card to open a new card and transfer the balance from the old card. If it does so, must the existing balance be protected?As was discussed in the FAQ, the rules in section 1026.55 on increasing an APR apply to acquired accounts and when a balance is transferred from one card to another card at the same credit union. The commentary to section 1026.55(d) specifically mentions accounts obtained through a merger as a type of acquired account the rules apply to. If Point Place FCU wants to increase the APR as part of the balance transfer, either initially or in the future, it may do so only if one of the exceptions in section 1026.55(b) apply. The two exceptions that generally apply here – temporary rate and advance notice – both create a protected balance.last_img read more

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