ROTC units host vigil to honor veterans

first_imgChris Collins | The Observer In observance of Veteran’s Day, the Notre Dame ROTC units stood vigil for 24 hours at the Clarke Memorial Fountain, known popularly as “Stonehenge,” to honor the men and women who have served.The celebration of Veteran’s Day began at 5 p.m. on Nov. 10, when a 24-hour vigil at the Clarke Memorial Fountain, known by students as “Stonehenge,” began. According to a University press release, cadets and midshipmen from all three ROTC units stood guard at the four corners of the fountain during the vigil. This 24-hour vigil is a traditional event that Notre Dame ROTC units hold each year, according to the release.The vigil concluded with a ceremony on the quad on Nov. 11, exactly 24-hours after the guarding of the memorial began. Cadets and midshipmen filled the quad, standing in rank to show respect for all the living and deceased men and women who served before them.The ceremony began with the introduction of the official party, which included Fr. Pete McCormick, director of Campus Ministry; James Wagenbach, former U.S. solider and Vietnam veteran; Lt. Col. Christopher Pratt, commanding officer of Notre Dame Army ROTC and professor of military science; Cmrd. Frederick Landau, executive officer of Notre Dame Naval ROTC and professor of naval science; and Col. Frank Rossi, commanding officer of Notre Dame Air Force ROTC and professor of aerospace studies.The introduction was followed by a playing of the national anthem, a prayer led by McCormick and a brief history of Veteran’s Day.“By guarding the memorial, we are showing reverence and respect for the veterans and the fallen heroes,” Cadet Maj. Robert Szabo said. “We are remembering what those men did in those wars.”All cadets and midshipman who guarded the memorial were honored during the ceremony.“The 24-hour vigil they just completed is not only a tribute to veterans, but a testament to [the cadets’ and midshipmen’s] commitment, strength and character,” Col. Pratt said in a speech during the ceremony. “Although most have yet to serve, they represent the best and the brightest of our country. They chose a path of service to this great nation that less than one half of 1 percent choose these days.”Pratt then introduced Wagenbach, the keynote speaker. In his introduction, Pratt noted that Wagenbach was both a Notre Dame alum and veteran. According to Pratt, Wagenbach served as a recon platoon leader and armored cavalry troop commander in Vietnam. He was medically discharged for wounds received in combat and decorated with a Silver Star Medal, the third highest military decoration for valor, awarded for gallantry and action against the enemy.Wagenbach spoke about a Notre Dame very different than the one students know today. In his speech, Wagenbach said during his time at Notre Dame in the 1960s, there were 6,000 total undergraduate students, 4,000 of which participated in ROTC.“James Wagenbach is both an American treasure and hero, and we are honored to have him with us,” Pratt said.The ceremony concluded as veterans in attendance were asked to stand and be recognized. Finally, taps was played to honor those veterans who passed.“To honor the men and women who have served is of the utmost importance,” Szabo said. “Holding a 24-hour vigil for Veteran’s Day, culminating in the ceremony on the quad, is a great way to show the importance of Veteran’s Day on campus.”Tags: Air Force ROTC, Army ROTC, Clarke Memorial Fountain, Naval ROTC, ROTC, Veterans Day God. Country. Notre Dame.On Nov. 11, this traditional Notre Dame motto took on an even deeper significance as Veteran’s Day was observed on North Quad by Notre Dame’s Army, Navy and Air Force ROTC units.last_img read more

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Africa’s largest solar-plus-wind-plus-storage project proposed in Kenya

first_imgAfrica’s largest solar-plus-wind-plus-storage project proposed in Kenya FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Tech:Japanese developer Eurus Energy and Australian-headquartered wind developer Windlab have signed a deal with Kenyan authorities to develop an 80MW solar-plus-wind-plus-storage facility in central Kenya. The Meru County Energy Park is being hailed as “Africa’s first large-scale hybrid wind, solar PV and battery project.”According to news reports in The Standard and ESI-Africa, the US$150 million plant will comprise 20 wind turbines and 40,000 solar panels. The facility will be a public-private partnership, and the Meru County government will own part of the project once it is operational. Construction is due to start in 2021.A memorandum of understanding (MoU) was signed between Windlab East Africa, Eurus Energy, the Kenya Investment Authority and Meru County government on Thursday 29 August at the Tokyo International Conference on African Development.In June, a consortium of government and development financiers, including the World Bank and Dutch development institution SNV, unveiled a US$47 million pot for providers of off-grid domestic solar in rural Kenya.More: Africa’s ‘largest’ solar-plus-wind-plus-storage project unveiledlast_img read more

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Patrolling the Borders

first_imgBy Brazilian Ministry of Defense January 23, 2017 The Integrated Border Monitoring System (SISFRON, per its Portuguese acronym), a program developed by the Brazilian Army, was allocated a $140-million budget for 2017. This high-tech equipment will enable oversight of a stretch of Brazil’s border that touches 10 other South American countries. The announcement was made on January 4th by Defense Minister Raul Jungmann, after a ministerial meeting with President Michel Temer at Planalto Palace. Minister Jungmann said during the press conference that Operation Ágata, led by the Ministry of Defense, and coordinated by the Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff of the Armed Forces, will occur more frequently and timely in order to surprise gangs operating along the border. The minister noted that this operation, which used to take place during a certain time of year, was rather ineffective and as a result the guidelines were revised. “Ágata will be ongoing, not just during one period of time. It will have an element of surprise and be supported by the intelligence system,” he explained. Minister Jungmann also stated that the government will have 35,000 service members from the Navy, Army, and Air Force operating across nearly 17,000 kilometers of border. “At various points in time, we’ll employ troops from the Armed Forces,” he stated. Law enforcement plan In order to strengthen law enforcement operations, President Temer met in his office with the main ministers of his administration to debate solutions for the sector. After nearly three hours, ministers Jungmann, Alexandre de Moraes, of the Ministry of Justice and Citizenship; and Sergio Etchegoyen, of the Institutional Security Cabinet, announced the decisions to be implemented by the federal, state, and local governments. “This is a viable program that will certainly have an impact on lowering the crime rate,” Minister Jungmann said. The minister also noted that another very valuable instrument for border control is the Geostationary Defense and Strategic Communications Satellite (SGDC, per its Portuguese acronym). The equipment will be launched into orbit on March 21st. The government invested $620 million in the SGDC and will have state control from bases in Brasília and Rio de Janeiro. The National Public Safety Program also has ongoing activities within the Ministry of Justice and Citizenship. According to Minister De Moraes, the government will partner with states and municipalities to attempt to reduce the number of homicides and crimes against women throughout the country. According to his statements, which were based on a survey, the state capitals of Porto Alegre, Natal, and Aracaju will engage in a collective effort to fight crime since they have a higher rate of violence against women. The government also transferred $372 million to those states last week to expand and improve the penitentiary system. Another $46 million will also be transferred to acquire a system to block cell phones at 30 percent of the prisons, plus $62 million to build five new penitentiaries, with one in each region of the country. The Minister of Defense also said that at the request of the head of the Supreme Court and the National Justice Council, Minister Cármen Lúcia, the Armed Forces will assist the judiciary in preparing a penitentiary census. The objective is to thoroughly review the country’s prison system, as well as to study inmate profiles.last_img read more

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NAFCU opposes 3rd-party exam amendment for CISA

first_imgNAFCU Senior Vice President of Government Affairs and General Counsel Carrie Hunt urged Senate leaders on Wednesday to oppose an amendment filed by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., for the “Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act” to give NCUA authority to regulate vendors serving credit unions.In her letter, Hunt noted that giving NCUA authority to regulate and examine service providers would not only be unnecessary but costly to credit unions, whose resources would fund the expansion.“We believe that the agency already has the tools that it needs to address concerns with vendors,” Hunt wrote. “The key to success with appropriate management of vendors is due diligence on behalf of the credit union. NAFCU supports credit unions being able to do this due diligence, and NCUA already offers due diligence guidance to credit unions. Giving NCUA additional authority will require the agency to develop an additional outlay of agency resources, which will in turn necessitate higher costs to credit unions.”NAFCU is working in support of S. 754, known as CISA, to secure greater security for financial data through business/government sharing of cyber-threat information. The NAFCU-backed bill was offered by Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., and Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.,  to help the nation defend against cyber-attacks through quicker, more efficient sharing of cyber-threat information between two sectors. continue reading » 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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The current microtrend of banks buying credit unions

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr “If you live long enough, you will see everything” is how one credit union executive reacted to the idea that banks should consider acquiring credit unions.Just a few years ago, the idea of a credit union buying a bank seemed crazy; today, it is a proven and successful growth strategy for credit unions. Could the initially surprising idea of banks buying credit unions follow a similar path? I don’t think so.In full disclosure, this author is from the dark side. I’ve been a banker for 30 years—big banks, small banks, mutual banks, consultant. I’ve been a bank CEO and a major stock holder and I’ve been involved in many types of bank mergers and acquisitions. For the last five years, I’ve been working with credit unions as they map out their growth strategies, including possible mergers with other credit unions and acquisitions of bank branches and even whole banks.So, what good could come of selling your credit union to a bank? Besides the obvious growth and size benefits, a bank could reap significant benefits from a credit union acquisition. A credit union is often rich in highly coveted core deposits. Additionally, credit unions have strengths in areas that could benefit banks. For example, credit unions are focused on retail banking and typically have consumer banking capabilities that would strengthen a bank’s performance in retail banking. Likewise, many credit unions have specialized expertise in such areas as insurance, investments, indirect auto lending and even trip and travel agency services for members. A bank might even consider maintaining the credit union brand (obviously sans the words “credit union”) to sustain the value of the retail relationships. continue reading »last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Orders Flags at Half-Staff to Honor Justice Antonin Scalia

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Press Release Governor Tom Wolf, in accordance with the Presidential Proclamation has ordered all United States and Commonwealth flags in the Capitol Complex and at all commonwealth facilities to fly at half-staff to honor Justice Antonin Scalia.Scalia, who served three decades on the bench of the Supreme Court, passed away on Saturday. Flags shall be lowered to half-staff and remain lowered until interment.All Pennsylvanians are invited to participate in this tribute. February 14, 2016center_img Governor Wolf Orders Flags at Half-Staff to Honor Justice Antonin Scalialast_img read more

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Renovated character homes popular at auction

first_imgThe home at 38 Annie St, Paddington. Photo: suppliedCHARACTER, a top notch renovation and location have proven to be the winning combination for Brisbane homes going under the hammer this weekend. In Paddington, a beautifully renovated 1920s home, in the Milton State School catchment, sold under the hammer on Saturday for $1.7 million. Marketing agent Judi O’Dea, of Space Property Agents, said the property at 38 Annie St attracted strong interest. The master bedroom at 153 Alexandra Rd, Clayfield.“The sub-million dollar market in Clayfield is really popular,” he said. “This particular property offered buyers an entry-level cottage on a slightly bigger than normal 536sq m block.“It had that renovation so you could move in and live comfortable or renovate further to add value.“We had buyers looking at both options.” The master bedroom at 38 Annie St, Paddington. Photo: supplied“They’ve been renting in the area for about 12 months and they fell in love with Paddington,” she said. “They wanted a sophisticated Paddington lifestyle and they were so in love with this home. They had been to see it five times before auction.” Ms O’Dea said the quality of the four-bedroom home, the 506sq m block and the Paddington address attracted buyers. “It’s getting harder and harder to purchase blocks bigger than 405sq m in Paddington now,” she said. In Grange, a renovated Queenslander also sold under the hammer on Saturday.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus23 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market23 hours agoThe home at 48 Montpelier St, Grange. Photo: suppliedMarketing agent Debora Sutton, of Belle Property Wilston, said the home at 48 Montpelier St sold for $1.7 million at auction. “We had four registered bidders and an opening bid of $1.2 million,” she said. “It was a very quick auction. “We had (active) bidding up to $1.535 million and then we got an increase to $1.7 million.” Ms Sutton said the five-bedroom, two-storey home was purchased by a local owner-occupier looking for a family home. The home at 153 Alexandra Rd, Clayfield.The property at 153 Alexandra Rd was sold by Alexander Shean and Dwight Ferguson of Ray White Ascot for $900,000. “It went to a young couple who live in the same street,” Mr Shean said. “It was the first home they’d purchased together.” Mr Shean said about 60 groups inspected the three-bedroom property and three offers were submitted prior to auction. center_img Inside the home at 48 Montpelier St, Grange. Photo: suppliedThe property has VJ walls, timber floors, high ceilings and city views. There is a balcony and a porch at the front of the home and a balcony at the back. The home is on a 615sq m block on the crest of a hill, and is in the Wilston State School catchment. In Clayfield, a renovated cottage with pool sold before it could make it to auction. Inside the home at 38 Annie St, Paddington. Photo: suppliedSix buyers registered to bid at the auction and a crowd of about 40 people watched on. “The opening bid was $1.5 million and we had two bidders who got straight into it,” Ms O’Dea said. “We had a couple who had sold their home in New South Wales bidding against a local couple.”The interstaters came out on top.Ms O’Dea said the new owners were “absolutely delighted” with their purchase and were keen to move in with their three sons. last_img read more

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Farmers asked to seek ways to improve their competitiveness

first_imgDr. Colin McIntyre. Image via: GIS NewsTrade Minister Dr. Colin McIntyre is appealing to farmers and vendors to continue to seek ways to improve their competitiveness within the agriculture sector.McIntyre told the annual Market Day with a Difference in Roseau last week that being competitive means offering customers reasonably priced quality products that are grown using safe agricultural practices and attractively packaged both to the local and overseas markets.He explained that there are global market forces that affect the way foods are sold and that should be taken into consideration.“The customers in the market where we do business desire foods that are free of chemical residues and physical defects. Consumers are very demanding and want their fruits to be a of a certain and color,” he explained.He said food must be sold in a particular manner that satisfies the pre-determined expectation and standards of the market.“If we do not adhere to this quality standard, we will not be able to sell our produce. As we continue to secure market opportunities, it will require considerable collaboration, investment and adjustment on the part of all concerned,” he added.Dominica Vibes News Share Sharing is caring! LocalNews Farmers asked to seek ways to improve their competitiveness by: – October 31, 2011 Tweetcenter_img Share Share 28 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

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Lacson sees ‘pattern of overpricing’ in purchase of COVID-19 equipment

first_imgMANILA – There was allegedly a pattern of overpricing in the Department of Health’s (DOH) procurement of medical equipment to address the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak.In an interview with ABS-CBN News Channel on Thursday, Sen. Panfilo Lacson slammed the DOH for supposedly taking advantage of the situation to satisfy their greed.“I think there should be a day of reckoning on all these because seizing an opportunity out of a crisis is a good thing when you do it for country. But to seize an opportunity for self-aggrandizement out of a crisis as big as the COVID-19 pandemic, I think that’s the height of callousness and greed,” Lacson said.“They could all come up with all sorts of reasons. But at the end of the day, we see a pattern of overpricing. If it’s only one item then probably it’s been overlooked, they can reason out a different supplier or manufacturer but it’s a pattern,” he added.Lacson also said that the swabbing system bought by DOH was twice the price procured by the private sector.“You cannot avoid being compared sa procurement price ng private sector. Bakit kapag ang government ang nagpo-procure hindi lang mahal, halos doble pa ‘yung presyo and we are operating on a very limited resources?” he said.During a Senate inquiry earlier this week, Lacson questioned the DOH for purchasing COVID-19 testing machines and swabbing kits for more than twice the price of similar equipment bought by private companies.A private company bought nucleic acid extractors needed to process coronavirus tests for P1.75 million each, while the DOH got the machines for P4 million each, Lacson said.DOH secretary Francisco Duque III, however, said they chose the P4-million equipment because other brands were not compatible with United States-manufactured machines in Philippine laboratories./PNlast_img read more

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Cuba J “Bill” Anson

first_imgCuba J “Bill” Anson, of West Harrison, Indiana, passed away October 9, 2017 in Dillsboro, Indiana.He was born October 2, 1918 in Perry County, IN, son of the late Henry and Minnie AnsonBill served his country in WWII, as a member of the United States Army.He worked as a Manager for Lincoln Income Life, retiring after over 21 years of service. Bill had previously worked as a foreman on the Southern Railway.He was a member of member of Holman Christian Union Church. Bill was the President of Gideons International Bible Association in Dearborn and Ohio counties. He was a member of New Albany Masonic lodge #79, as well as a member of the Eastern Star. When he was young, Bill enjoyed hunting, fishing, sketching and painting. He had played bass guitar in a band. Bill also enjoyed working on lawnmowers, Most of all, he enjoyed joking and laughing.Surviving are daughter, Helena (Robert) Schildknecht of Crestwood, KY, son, Paul Badger of Sellersburg, IN; step-children, Angee (Brad) Ellis of Guilford, IN, Maureen “Jody” Ward (Ron Hanner) of Greensburg, IN, Jeff (Johnanna) McCormick of West Harrison, IN; 11 grandchildren, and 13 great grandchildren special friend, Millie Craft.He was preceded in death by his parents, his first wife,  Jean Lorraine Carr Badger Anson, his second wife, Thelma Kirby Anson, and his son, Gene Badger.Friends will be received Thursday, October 12, 2017, 10:30 am – 11:30 am at Rullman Hunger funeral home, Aurora, Indiana. Services will be held at the funeral home October 12, 2017 at 11:30 am with Pastor Michael Addison officiating.Interment will follow in the Graceland Memorial Park, New Albany, IN. Military services will follow the funeral services.Contributions may be made to the Holman Christian Union Church. If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

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