Students Thank Chance The Rapper In Open Letter For His Donation To Chicago Public Schools

first_imgIn the beginning of March, Chance The Rapper donated one-million dollars to Chicago’s public school system, only reaffirming that he is, in fact, the man. The Chicago-born rapper and former student of Chicago public schools was moved to donate the money for Chicago public schools following major budgets cuts and after a disappointing meeting with Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner, in which Chance advocated for the Governor to invest rather than cut funding for schools.As published in Billboard, three 10th grade students from Lake View High School, one of the schools receiving money from Chance’s donation toward the Chicago public school system. The letter thanks him not only for his generous donation but also for advocating to others to do the same, noting the impact his words could have. The students go on to note that Chance continues to give back to his home town, hosting free concerts and donating money as a way to show he truly cares about the city and that fame hasn’t changed him.The letter also addressed gun violence in Chicago, addressing the time that Chance helped stop gun violence for 42 hours in the city using messaging on his Twitter and through local radio stations. The students end the letter by talking about what Chance means to them as non-white students in Chicago: “As minority students we feel ignored and as though we don’t have enough support from bigger influences like you. Being born and raised in Chicago is not easy at all. There are so many stereotypes and restrictions we have as teenagers due to the frequent violence and crimes. Your music puts some at ease because we know that someone cares and someone has experienced these daily struggles too. You and your music have taught us that you can be true to yourself and still be successful, still be self-made.”You can read the full letter for yourself here or below, and if you’re feeling inspired, join Chance by donating to the Chicago Public Education Fund here.First and foremost, we as Chicago Public School students would like to thank you for the supportive donation to our schools. As we all know, CPS has been struggling financially, and your donation has really given us a push to get to where we need to be and possibly motivate others to give back to the community as well. This is only one of the many things that you have done to improve our Chicago.After you gave CPS the push that was needed to help give us students what we deserve, you encouraged other celebrities such as Derrick Rose to do so as well. If this goes on, CPS could be saved and our schools could receive the best educational experience we are worthy of. You are one of the reasons this can be made possible.All of the things that you do for our city never go unnoticed. All of the free concerts you host and all the time you spend here in the city really show you care. We notice it. We look up to you because the fame usually takes humility away from artists, but it hasn’t changed you.There are many big celebrities from Chicago, but you are one of the few that really give back. It is evident that you sincerely care for the youth here. This is why you are an inspiration to us. We appreciate you for not only representing us through your music, but also through your actions.In Chicago, a person is shot every 2 hours and 48 minutes. A person is murdered every 14 hours and 27 minutes, and you helped stop gun violence in Chicago for 42 hours with the help of your Twitter account and various Chicago radio stations. Even though this was three years ago, the fact you had such a tremendous impact on Chicago shows how much the people of this city look up to you.You’re more than just an artist to us, you are a way of life. You make music that we can relate to on many levels, because you know what living in Chicago is like, and you want to make changes in the city. We may not be from the same side but we come from the same city. We just want to thank you for not forgetting where you came from and helping the city of Chicago in more ways than just being an inspirational rapper. You’re using your fame for good and not just to look good. You gave $1 million dollars of your personal money to Chicago schools and that’s something no one has done for us.We thank you for supporting Chicago’s minority youth when not many others have put time to think about the kids. As minority students we feel ignored and as though we don’t have enough support from bigger influences like you. Being born and raised in Chicago is not easy at all. There are so many stereotypes and restrictions we have as teenagers due to the frequent violence and crimes. Your music puts some at ease because we know that someone cares and someone has experienced these daily struggles too. You and your music have taught us that you can be true to yourself and still be successful, still be self-made.Once again, thank you for aiding us and giving something back to the city we know and love, Chicago. Sincerely,Alex Rojas, Alondra Cerros, and Annelisse BetancourtLake View High School StudentsChicago, Illinoislast_img read more

Read More
Dave Matthews & Tim Reynolds Announce Additional Artists For 2018 Riviera Maya Event

first_imgToday, Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds have announced the additional performers and daytime activities for their second annual destination event in Riviera Maya, Mexico. Set for January 12-14, 2018, the all-inclusive concert vacation features three nights of Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds performing on the beach in Riviera Maya, Mexico, just steps away from the ocean. Additional artists include critically acclaimed hit-maker Brandi Carlile, 2016 Best Folk Album GRAMMY-winning husband-and-wife banjo duo Béla Fleck & Abigail Washburn and sister trio Joseph, each set to open one night each of the 3 the nightly concerts. Additional unique performances including daytime poolside sets will be announced in the coming weeks.Watch Dave Matthews & Tim Reynolds Perform Rare “Dodo” In MexicoThis serene Caribbean getaway, designed in partnership with CID Presents, will offer guests a fully curated experience: exclusive access to three nights of beachside performances, all-inclusive food and drink, premium hotel accommodations, shuttle service to and from Cancun International Airport and 24-hour concierge service. Guests can choose from a limited amount of remaining packages at five tropical resorts including the concert’s host resort, The Barcelo Maya.Also revealed today are daily on-site activities, including daily sunrise and morning yoga sessions, paddleboard / kayak rentals, surfing contests and many more. Off-site adventures have also been announced including catamaran tours, zip-line & ATV tours, day trips to the Mayan ruins of Tulum and Chichen Itza, journeys to Rio Secreto (an underground all water cave) and much more.The two musicians met more than 25 years ago in Charlottesville, VA and have been collaborating ever since. Their rare performances as an acoustic duo allow fans to experience their special chemistry up-close, as they strip down each song to its essence and tell stories. Last year’s event saw the duo contribute acoustic sets with big bust outs, debuts, and more for each night. If last year’s event was any indication, the 2018 Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds Riviera Maya is sure to be something special.For more information or to purchase ticket/accommodation packages for Dave Matthews & Tim Reynolds’ Riviera Maya destination weekend, head to the event website.last_img read more

Read More
Harvard’s Wesley Saunders earns honors

first_imgHarvard junior Wesley Saunders has been named to the 2013 Lou Henson Preseason All-America Team, as announced Wednesday by the award committee.Saunders was a unanimous first team All-Ivy League selection a year ago after leading the Ancient Eight in scoring at 16.2 ppg. The Los Angeles native was also tops in the league in steals (55), third in field goal percentage (52.2) and minutes (37.3), and was seventh in assists (3.5).Saunders scored in double-digits in 29 of 30 games while leading the Crimson to the third round of the NCAA Tournament and a third straight Ivy League title. An NABC All-District first team pick, Saunders picked up five Ivy League Player of the Week honors.The Lou Henson Preseason All-America Team is composed of 25 student-athletes from mid-major conferences. Following the season, the Lou Henson Award is presented annually to the top mid-major student-athlete in Division I college basketball. The award is named in honor of Lou Henson, who retired after a spectacular coaching career that lasted 41 years.For more on Harvard men’s basketball, visit gocrimson.com.last_img read more

Read More
Tony Nominee The Visit Sets Broadway Closing Date

first_img The Visit After struggling with low grosses for some time, The Visit will close on June 14. Starring legendary two-time Tony winner Chita Rivera, the production began previews on March 26 and officially opened on April 23 at Broadway’s Lyceum Theatre.Along with Best Musical, The Visit received 2015 Tony nominations for Best Leading Actress in a Musical for Rivera, Best Score for Kander & Ebb, Best Book of a Musical for McNally and Best Lighting Design for Japhy Weideman. It garnered no wins.John Kander and Fred Ebb’s The Visit is based on the classic Friedrich Dürrenmatt play (adapted by Maurice Valency) and features a book by Terrence McNally, with music by Kander and lyrics by Ebb. Claire Zachanassian is an often-widowed millionairess who pays a visit to her hardship-stricken birthplace. The locals hope she’ll bring them a new lease on life, but little do they know her offer to revitalize the town comes at a dreadful price.Directed by John Doyle and choreographed by Graciela Daniele, the production also features Tom Nelis, George Abud, Jason Danieley, Matthew Deming, Diana Dimarzio, David Garrison, Rick Holmes, Chris Newcomer, Mary Beth Peil, Aaron Ramey, Elena Shadow, Timothy Shew, John Riddle and Michelle Veintimilla.Broadway.com customers with tickets to canceled performances will be contacted with information on refunds or exchanges. Related Shows View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on June 14, 2015last_img read more

Read More
UGA researcher embarks on new study of cowpea curculio

first_imgBelieve it or not, field peas — a fixture of the Southern dinner table — can be too difficult to grow in Georgia.A pest called the curculio weevil has moved most of the production of cowpeas out of the state. With the cowpea exodus, Georgia farmers lost a crop that adds nitrogen to the soil and suits the state’s often hot, dry growing conditions.A dramatic decline“The cowpea curculio is to Southern peas what the boll weevil is to cotton,” said David Riley, a vegetable entomologist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.The curculio has played a hand in reducing the total acreage of Southern peas grown in Georgia from 86,500 in 1951 to a low of 4,311 in 1997. Due to curculio damage, 40 percent of the crop value was lost in 1995 alone. Adults lay eggs inside the pea pods, where the grubs feed on the developing peas. The grubs can then make it all the way through the processing line and even wind up on your dinner plate. Reproducing several times within a year, the curculio has a stubborn penchant for developing resistance to insecticides, with the standard pyrethroid treatments rapidly losing effectiveness.“If you can’t get a handle on it, it can literally run the acreage out of the state,” said Riley.An increase in Georgia cowpea acreage to more than 8,000 in 2009 came with an increased number of farmers’ calls to Riley about curculio outbreaks. At the time Southern peas had a farm gate value of more than $12 million, according to the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association.The bug had never gone away. It just had fallen off the radar. Renewed researchWith the decline in cowpea acreage and focus diverted to other pressing vegetable insect problems, research on the curculio had been forgotten or fallen by the wayside. Once acreage started to rise, the curculio resumed its role as a serious economic pest. Starting in 2011, Riley embarked on research to study the curculio’s biology, population dynamics, susceptibility to insecticides and the resistance of host plants. “They’re very funny little weevils,” Riley said. “Talk about playing opossum, they’re specialists in playing dead.” Geared to avoid becoming the prey of birds, the curculio is a tricky pest. The elusiveness that makes curculio difficult to control also makes it difficult to study.“When you approach a plant, they’ll drop off the plant and literally look like they’re dead. But they’re just lying on the ground, and they’ll stay that way for 15 to 20 minutes — long enough for you to lose interest and walk away.”Developing a new trapSpotting the bug in the field can be nearly impossible. Consequently, most research on population dynamics in the past assessed curculio numbers by crop damage, which by that point was too late to apply any kind of controls.Riley needed real-time measurements of adults in the field. Past insecticides have targeted adults, but they can be useless if not applied at the proper time.By combining existing traps, Riley developed a new trap that for the first time could pick up adults early in the season, providing critical information on population count and movement.Original dataWith help from Lacey Lewis, a high school student in the UGA Young Scholar program, he conducted a marked-release study, placing the weevils in the middle of a pea field and tracking their damage. The wing-less curculio moved with surprising speed hundreds of feet from the release point in both directions along the row.His study collected new data on the weevils’ movement late in the season and their behavior over the winter, providing insight to possibilities of managing the pest in the landscape. Riley also found that no pea cultivar provided complete resistance. Only some of the white varieties could provide a measure of tolerance.With the curculio apparently developing resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, Riley identified only one insecticide that could knock down the pest, although it’s currently not registered for cowpeas.Alternative insecticidesWhile he’s working to move that chemical through the regulatory approval, Riley warns that one insecticide won’t be the long-term solution to the curculio.Alternatives have to be developed. Otherwise, the control system will fail as the bug develops resistance, he said.Regional assessmentRiley cautions that a regional survey for the curculio has not been done in a few decades. Much of the cowpea acreage outside of Georgia may now have curculio. As the bug expands it range, the potential losses to commercial cowpeas will only be multiplied.“These things will eat your lunch, basically,” Riley said.last_img read more

Read More
ISO/QS, Inc. Opens New England Office

first_imgIndividual Solutions Options / Quality Services, Inc., a high technology management, quality, and environmental consulting firm headquartered in Austin, Texas announces the opening of its New England office in Burlington, Vermont. Robert C. Greenlese has signed on as Senior Consultant to head this office. The New England office will specialize in process improvement consulting, including implementation of quality and environmental management systems (and their integration) as well as process improvement techniques to improve an organization’s bottom line results.Mr. Greenlese previously worked at IBM Microelectronics as a staff engineer in quality, reliability, and process development. He holds a Bachelors of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Clarkson University, a Bachelor or Arts in Physics from SUNY at Potsdam, and a Masters of Science in Mircoelectronic Manufacturing Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.The New England office offers a wide range of training and consulting services to provide customized solutions at affordable prices to a wide variety of technical and non-technical firms. For further information, Please view their website at www.isoqsinc.com(link is external) or contact them at ISOQSBob@adelphia.net(link sends e-mail), 802-899-3543.last_img read more

Read More
Vermont Guard solar project completed

first_imgUS Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Maj. Gen. Michael Dubie, the Vermont National Guard commander, today marked the completion of one of the largest solar installations in Vermont and one of the largest solar projects on any National Guard base in the country.  The chairman of the Senate Green Jobs Subcommittee, Sanders helped secure $8.5 million to make the base here one of the greenest in the United States and a model for other guard installations around the country. ‘I am very appreciative and proud of what General Dubie and the Vermont National Guard have accomplished in constructing this solar project.  The U.S. military is the largest consumer of energy in the world, and the Vermont National Guard is now playing a significant role in becoming a model for the Department of Defense as it moves toward energy efficiency and sustainable energy,’ Sanders said. The project will help reduce reliance on foreign oil, help the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and help the economy by creating jobs and saving taxpayers’ money, Sanders said.  This project will produce 1.5 megawatts of clean energy, save the Vermont National Guard nearly $250,000 per year in energy costs, and reduce carbon dioxide emissions from the base by about 236 tons per year.  From an energy independence standpoint, the Defense Department has set an aggressive target of meeting 25 percent of its electricity needs with renewable energy by 2025, a goal the Vermont solar project will help achieve. The military today spends billions a year on energy and transportation fuel costs. From the vantage point of the environment and climate change, the Pentagon has been a strong voice in recognizing the need to address global warming.  Military analysts recognize that climate change could aggravate instability around the world and drain military resources in the event of natural disasters and humanitarian crises. With regard to jobs and the economy, the solar industry workforce has more than doubled since 2009, growing from 46,000 workers to more than over 100,000 today. At the same time, the price of solar installations continues to drop, by nearly 20 percent last year alone. SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt., Oct. 1 ‘last_img read more

Read More
An Insider’s Guide to Exploring the New River Gorge National River

first_imgExploring the abundance of outdoor recreation, cultural, and historical sites that span the more than 70,000-acre New River Gorge National River in one weekend — let alone one day — is impossible. The park offers ample outdoor adventures — hiking, rock climbing, mountain biking, whitewater rafting, and fishing — for exploring this West Virginia treasure. If planning a first-time visit, below are five sites any newbie should see.new_river_gorge_bridgeNew River Gorge BridgeThe bridge stretches almost six-tenths of a mile and stands 876 feet above the New River. Completed in October 1977, the New River Gorge Bridge was built as a means to fuel more economic development and create better access to rural areas. Check out the Long Point, Bridge, and Canyon Rim Boardwalk hiking trails for different vantages of the mammoth structure. The Fayette County Chamber of Commerce also hosts the annual Bridge Day festival — this year’s event is Oct. 15 — when the bridge is closed to vehicular traffic and visitors can legally walk across the river on the roadway. Thousands of spectators attend each year, as do hundreds of BASE jumpers who leap from the bridge into the Gorge below.Endless WallTrue to its name, the 2.4-mile Endless Wall Trail winds through hemlock- and rhodendenron-choked forest and along a cliffline offering panoramic views of the New River and New River Gorge Bridge. The trail also offers access to several of the more than 1,400 established climbing routes available in the park.  endless_wallFayetteville, W.Va.Explore downtown Fayetteville. The small town, located about two miles from the New River Gorge Bridge, is home to several outfitters, a yoga studio, craft brewery, and restaurants including the Secret Sandwich Society and Cathedral Café, as well as plenty of other cultural and historical attractions.Fayetteville (Secret Sandwich Society)Babcock State ParkSearching for a base camp from which to explore the New River Gorge? Check out Babcock State Park. The 4,127-acre park is located about a half-hour from Fayetteville and within the national river boundaries. It includes a campground and cabins, more than 20 miles of hiking trails, fishing, a 19-acre lake, and the Glade Creek Grist Mill that is operational and produces freshly ground cornmeal that you can purchase.babcock_state_parkWhitewater Rafting and Sandstone FallsDescribed as one of the best whitewater rivers in the eastern U.S., the New River Gorge National River includes 53 miles of the 320-mile New River between Bluestone Dam and Hawks Nest Lake. The upper section of the river, from Hinton to Thurmond, provides runs that include Class I, II and III rapids. The section below Thurmond, “the Lower Gorge,” includes more challenging, Class IV and V rapids and is only recommended for more advanced paddlers. You can run the river on your own or go through a local outfitter.whitewater_rafting-sandstone_fallsBelow Hinton, W.Va.,the southern gateway to the New River Gorge National River,  is the largest waterfall on the New River. Sandstone Falls stretches 1,500 feet across the river and drops 10 to 25 feet. Walk along the ¼-mile Sandstone Falls Boardwalk for a close-up view of the falls or stop by the Sandstone Falls overlook off West Virginia Route 20 for a view from 600 feet above the river. Also visit Hinton. The former railroad center boasts an historic district, railroad museum, antique shops, and restaurants.[divider]About the Author[/divider]DunnKatie Dunn, a journalist from Wise, Va., is an avid hiker, runner, and all-around outdoor enthusiast. She is also co-director of the High Knob Hellbender 10K road race in Norton, Va. and co-founder of the High Knob Outdoor Club.Related Articles:last_img read more

Read More
Did you feel it? A 5.1 magnitude earthquake shakes North Carolina and the Southeast

first_imgDepending on construction timelines, the campground may remain closed for the rest of the season. Mortimer Campground is located northwest of Lenoir in the Wilson Creek Watershed in Caldwell County, NC. Good news for all you climbers out there. A team at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus found that 80% ethanol liquid chalk killed 100% of COVID-19 within five minutes. But before you go thanking the liquid chalk in your climbing bag for its pandemic protection, it’s important to note that liquid chalks are sold with varying alcohol concentrations. “If you don’t have more than 65% isopropyl alcohol or ethanol, you’re not going to be sterilizing,” said Ross Kedl, professor of immunology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the researcher behind the study. If you felt the ground move under your feet Sunday morning you weren’t imagining things. A 5.1 magnitude earthquake, its epicenter in Sparta, N.C., struck the Southeast, the effects of which could be felt up to 200 miles away across much of North Carolina, Upstate South Carolina, and as far away as Atlanta and Ashland, Kentucky. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the quake occurred at 8:07 a.m. It was the strongest to shake the region since 1916, when a magnitude 5.2 earthquake struck. There were no reports of serious injuries, though people near the epicenter reported minor structural damage.  Climbing can help kill COVID. Here’s how. Did you feel it? A 5.1 magnitude earthquake shakes North Carolina and the Southeastcenter_img While the 80% ethanol liquid chalk does kill the virus, Kedl says climbers should think of it as hand sanitizer because the effects don’t last long-term. That said, “if you have a gym full of people who are wearing masks and all of them are using this chalk, your chances of getting a wall contaminated with coronavirus are pretty small,” he says.  Photo: Beautiful azaleas blooming in mountains. Green hills, meadows, and sky in the background. Summer mountain landscape. Near Asheville, Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, USA. Courtesy of Getty Images by MargaretW Mortimer Campground on Pisgah National Forest to temporarily close Beginning today, Mortimer Campground on Pisgah National Forest will temporarily close for major construction of a bridge to replace the low water crossing of Thorps Creek, which flows through the campground, the Forest Service said in a news release. The bridge replacement will improve water quality and native and wild trout habitat in the Wilson Creek Watershed. last_img read more

Read More
2007 SUMMIT COVERAGE: Businesses must overcome ‘fog’ of pandemic preparedness

first_img See also: Adding to that miasma is the state of US healthcare. In part because of a shortage of workers and the physical limitations of medical centers, the system has little “surge capacity” for the huge influx of patients a pandemic would cause. “We have basically taken [the healthcare] system and sucked it to the bone,” Osterholm said. Maintain flexibility. Osterholm recognized the uncertainty involved in pandemic planning and stressed that plans need malleability so they can adapt to the elusive realities of a pandemic. “Anyone who develops a concrete plan is making a mistake,” he said. “Be capable and be flexible. Another layer of mist comes in the form of making decisions about vaccines and antiviral drugs. Osterholm lauded companies like Roche for increasing production of antiviral drugs like osteltamivir (Tamiflu), but said it remains unclear how effective these drugs will be against H5N1 if it becomes the pandemic strain. How high mortality rates will be Overcome pandemic fatigue. Recognize that some executives may see pandemic planning as no longer important, Osterholm said, calling the phenomenon “pandemic fatigue” and saying, “Acknowledge, accept, and plan around pandemic fatigue.” Osterholm spoke at CIDRAP’s “Business Preparedness for Pandemic Influenza: Second National Summit,” held this week for hundreds of leaders in business, government, and academia. How effective and plentiful antiviral drugs and vaccines will be—and when they’ll be ready Osterholm, director of the University of Minnesota’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), publisher of CIDRAP News, said that several factors cloud the preparedness landscape: Even if companies stockpile antivirals, they face another dilemma: when to use them. If they were to withhold them during a first pandemic wave anticipating a more severe second wave that didn’t happen, people would question the decision, Osterholm said. Likewise, leaders could decide to distribute stockpiled drugs during the first wave, only to discover that the second is more severe. “When do you blow your wad?” he asked. How our communities will mitigate damage “Pre-pandemic” vaccines can be stockpiled in the hope that they may provide some protection against the influenza strain that ultimately causes a pandemic. However, as pointed out by vaccine expert Gregory Poland, MD, in a separate summit presentation Tuesday, a vaccine targeted to the specific pandemic strain would take months to develop and distribute. Feb 7, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Orlando, FL – As businesses develop pandemic preparedness plans, they need to cut through a “fog” of uncertainty about exactly what pandemic influenza will look like and how their companies will be able to respond to it, infectious disease expert Michael Osterholm, PhD, MPH, said at a summit in Orlando Monday. The result, said Osterholm, is that “the availability of protective vaccine during the first wave of a pandemic just won’t be there.” He added, “For most of the world’s population, a vaccine will never be available throughout the duration of a pandemic.” Work around “just in time.” “Don’t try to change the global just-in-time economy,” he said. “That’s like swimming up Niagara Falls. Forget it. You’ve got to work around it.” And with estimates of the mortality rate in a pandemic ranging widely, Osterholm surmised, “We don’t really have a clue” about how many people will succumb. How many waves of the pandemic will occur, and how severe they’ll be Pandemic planning can produce its own haze as planners grapple with issues like ensuring their supply chain or determining government’s role. “We talk about what we might do or can do, but we really don’t know,” Osterholm said. “There are so many uncertainties.” This extends to experts’ estimates of how a pandemic might behave. “We have only a general sense of what the next pandemic influenza strain is capable of doing in terms of human illness or subsequent collateral damage,” he said. Add to that today’s just-in-time economy, in which supplies arrive as they are needed so that companies minimize storage costs. “It is the reality of today’s economy,” Osterholm said. “It’s what MBAs are made of.” That reality, though, means that “even a hiccup” of disruption will mean serious shortages, he predicted. Full text of Feb 2007 HHS report on community mitigation measureshttp://www.pandemicflu.gov/professional/community/community_mitigation.pdf Other steps businesses can take, according to Osterholm, include: “You’re not stuck to a plan,” he said. “You’re stuck to a process.” In addition, said Poland, director of the Mayo Vaccine Research Group in Rochester, Minn., drug companies—even at maximum worldwide production—could deliver only enough vaccine to inoculate 1% to 2% of the world’s population. Shining some light into the pandemic cloud, however, is the recent document on community mitigation measures by the US Department of Health and Human Services (see links below). “You don’t want to have a [pandemic planning] policy inconsistent with this document,” Osterholm said. How our overloaded healthcare systems will cope How our global just-in-time economy will affect access to goods and services He took his “fog of pandemic preparedness” concept from the theory of the “fog of war,” a state of ambiguity soldiers can find themselves in when they doubt their own capabilities and feel unsure of their adversary’s capabilities and intentions. Feb 1 CIDRAP News story: “HHS ties pandemic mitigation advice to severity” Learn from veterans. We need to look at those in the military who have studied the fog of war to explore what to do when unsure about what steps to take.last_img read more

Read More