Zimbabwe hits out against international sanctions during address to UN debate

24 September 2010International economic sanctions against Zimbabwe are illegal and have caused “untold suffering” for its people, President Robert Mugabe told the General Assembly today, calling for them to be scrapped immediately. “The people of Zimbabwe should, like every other sovereign State, be left to freely chart their own destiny,” said Mr. Mugabe, addressing the second day of the annual high-level segment of the 192-member Assembly.He said the sanctions imposed by the United States and the European Union (EU) were introduced without reference to the United Nations and “with the evil intention of causing regime change. “These illegal sanctions have caused untold suffering among Zimbabweans, who alone should be the deciders of regime change.”The country’s Inclusive Government, formed early last year after disputed presidential and parliamentary elections in 2008, is united against the sanctions, Mr. Mugabe said.“The rest of the international community – including the SADC (Southern African Development Community), COMESA (Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa) and the African Union – has similarly called for the removal of the sanctions, but these calls have gone unheeded.”In his speech Mr. Mugabe also called for the reform of the Bretton Woods institutions, such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and other multilateral financial institutions.“It is important to understand that the critical issues that we face today cannot be addressed effectively when so many countries and regions are left out of the key decision-making processes of institutions of global governance. We need to participate in the making of policies and decisions that affect our very livelihoods.” read more

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Timeline of events leading up to key UK Supreme Court ruling

LONDON — Britain’s Supreme Court is set to rule Tuesday on whether Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s five-week suspension of Parliament was legal. Here’s how we got here.July 24, 2019: Boris Johnson becomes prime minister after winning a party leadership contest to succeed Theresa May. He vows to leave the European Union on Oct. 31, with or without a deal.August 28: Johnson suspends Parliament for a five-week period ending Oct. 14. Queen Elizabeth II approves his request, as she is required to do under Britain’s constitutional monarchy. He says it is a routine decision to set the stage for announcement of his new domestic agenda, but House of Commons Speaker John Bercow calls it a “constitutional outrage.”August 29: Activist Gina Miller launches legal action against Johnson at the High Court in London. Her case is subsequently joined by former prime minister John Major and others.August 30: In a separate case, a judge in Scotland refuses to grant an emergency measure blocking the suspension of Parliament but schedules a full hearing at a later date.September 4: The Court of Session in Scotland rejects the bid to have the suspension declared unlawful.September 5: The High Court in London hears Miller’s case against the suspension. Her lawyers argue the move was an “unlawful abuse of power” by the prime minister.September 6: The High Court in London rejects Miller’s case. She vows to take it to the Supreme Court.September 11: The Inner House of the Court of Session in Scotland rules that the suspension was illegal and was intended to “stymie” Parliament ahead of the Brexit deadline.September 17: A three-day hearing on both cases begins at the Supreme Court, with 11 justices presiding.September 24: The Supreme Court is scheduled to announce its decision.The Associated Press read more

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