Paul Finebaum Thinks The “Hottest” Rivalry In The SEC Is Georgia vs. Florida

first_imgAn extreme closeup of ESPN's Paul Finebaum.ARLINGTON, TX – DECEMBER 31: TV/radio personality Paul Finebaum of the SEC Network speaks on air before the Goodyear Cotton Bowl at AT&T Stadium on December 31, 2015 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)The Georgia vs. Florida football rivalry is one of the best – and most evenly match – in the country. According to Paul Finebaum, it’s also the “hottest” in the SEC right now.Finebaum sat down for an interview with DawgNation this week and stated that he believes the current rivalry between the Bulldogs and the Gators is the best in the league. He thinks that Florida believes it’s close to Georgia, while Bulldogs fans think they’re crazy.Here’s the quote, via Mike Griffith:“I believe right now, based on what I’ve heard, based one what I do every day listening to callers, I believe it’s the hottest rivalry in the SEC right now,” Finebaum told DawgNation in an exclusive interview at the SEC Spring Meetings last week.“I think there’s a sense at Florida that they are gaining and literally breathing down Georgia’s neck, that’s been promoted by Dan Mullen, and I’ve heard it,” he said. “Georgia fans are like, ‘are you kidding me?’The past two years have seen blowout victories for Georgia. The Bulldogs took care of business 42-7 in 2017 and 36-17 in 2018. Overall, the Bulldogs lead the series as well – either 51-43-2 or 52-43-2, depending upon which side you ask. In theory, the Bulldogs should be favored again in 2019. The program came a few plays away from qualifying for the College Football Playoff a year ago in a close loss to Alabama. They’ve also been recruiting at a high level.Regardless, this year’s game should have some extra juice. We can’t wait for it.last_img read more

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Murder of Somalia human rights activist prompts UN condemnation

16 March 2007United Nations human rights and humanitarian officials today deplored the assassination of a leading human rights activist in Somalia, saying such attacks were all too common in the strife-torn Horn of Africa nation. Isse Abdi Isse, the chairman of KISIMA, a non-governmental organization (NGO), was shot dead yesterday in a hotel in the capital, Mogadishu, where he had been participating in a workshop.UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Louise Arbour stressed that human rights defenders must be allowed to carry out their work in safety and without fear of retaliation, her spokesperson José Luis Díaz told reporters in Geneva.Ms. Arbour urged Somalia’s Transitional Federal Government (TFG) to conduct a prompt and impartial investigation into the murder and into all other attacks on rights defenders.Ghanim Alnajjar, the UN Independent Expert on the situation of human rights in Somalia, issued a statement expressing his deep sadness at the killing and offering his condolences to Mr. Isse’s family, friends and colleagues.“The killing of Mr. Isse starkly highlights the absence of human rights protection mechanisms for human rights defenders as well as other civilians, and the atmosphere of impunity in which Somalis live,” Mr. Alnajjar said.“After 16 years of conflict, Somalia is at a critical juncture. I wish to remind all that the work carried out by human rights defenders is crucial to building the foundation for security and a lasting peace.”UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia Eric Laroche described Mr. Isse as a dedicated human rights defender in the country’s Lower Juba region.“Isse championed human rights causes in the region for many years and his death is undoubtedly a loss to all Somalis who at this time are seeking peace and reconciliation,” Mr. Laroche said.“Civil society organizations, such as KISIMA, that continue to operate in Somalia under very difficult conditions are increasingly becoming the target of attacks as a result of the work they do.” read more

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Legal marijuana will only sip 1 out of221B Canadian booze sales study

MONTREAL — The recreational marijuana industry is expected to take a sip of less than one per cent initially out of annual Canadian alcohol sales once it becomes legal, a new analysis says.The Anderson Economic Group, a business consulting firm in New York, says legalization of marijuana would sap $160 million out of the country’s $22.1 billion booze sector, rising as use of the drug expands.While there are numerous unknowns governing the sale of marijuana, the Anderson Economic Group based its projections on alcohol sales in U.S. states that have legalized the drug. It also took into account a host of factors in Canada including spending patterns, income and demographics.The beer market, which is worth about $9.2 billion, is anticipated to take a $70 million hit from in the first year of marijuana legalization, the Anderson Economic Group says.[related_link /]“It won’t affect spending patterns necessarily the first year to the degree where individuals’ buying habits will change overnight,” said Peter Schwartz, an Anderson consultant and editor of its biannual Cannabis Market Report that will include the analysis in its summer issue.A Deloitte report has estimated that the Canadian market for marijuana could be worth up to around $22.6 billion a year, including about $4.9 billion to $8.7 billion from the sale of the substance, with the rest coming from the ancillary market including growers, testing labs and security.Analyst Vivien Azer of U.S.-based research firm Cowen and Company is anticipating the alcohol industry could be under substantial pressure over the next decade if young people continue to take a pass on drinking.In a report released last month, Azer said just under 82 per cent of 18- to 29-year-olds in Ontario consumed alcohol in 2015, down 5.5 percentage points since 2008, while marijuana use has been steady at around 34 to 36 per cent.“Our focus on these younger consumers reflects our belief that the experimenter of today is the leading consumer of tomorrow,” said the report by Azer who also covers Canopy Growth (TSX:WEED).The head of Molson Coors Canada, the country’s second-largest brewer, said there is conflicting data about what marijuana legalization will do to alcohol sales, but he is watching the issue closely.“I don’t think we can say we’re worried,” Frederic Landtmeters said in an interview. “We are conscious that this is something that will come up that may have an impact.”Luke Harford, president of Beer Canada, said he believes the country’s aging population and relatively high taxation are bigger threats to the industry than marijuana.We are conscious that this is something that will come up that may have an impact“We really see beer as being a product that has a long history in Canada and is part of social occasions and celebrations that just aren’t tied to what marijuana is tied to,” he said.As for taxes, Harford said he doesn’t want the government to give marijuana “a free ride.”“We want to make sure that we’re not in the market with one hand tied behind our back.”Spirits Canada president Jan Westcott said forecasts on the impact marijuana will have on the alcohol business are highly speculative at this point.“As you get down to such small numbers in the overall market you have to start wondering about the accuracy of any projections,” he said.“We’re all anxious to know the answer to that. The fact is nobody really knows.”The federal government is aiming to make the recreational use of marijuana legal on July 1, 2018. read more

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