Brett McMurphy’s New Tweet About Ohio State Fans Is Going Viral

first_imgBrett McMurphy speaking back when he worked at ESPN.Back in 2011, Kirk Herbstreit famously moved from Columbus, Ohio to Nashville, due in part to a “vocal minority of relentless” Ohio State fans. Amid his reporting into the program, Brett McMurphy sympathizes with Herbstreit.Of course, McMurphy does not live in Columbus. However, social media has come a long way since 2011.Intentionally or not, McMurphy became a big part of the Urban Meyer, Zach Smith story. As a free agent, he broke the story open while running out the clock on his ESPN contract, by posting directly to his Facebook author page.Without the coverage of a giant company like ESPN behind him, McMurphy has taken the brunt of Buckeye fans’ focus amid this month-long process.Last night, after 12 hours of deliberations by the Ohio State Board of Trustees, Urban Meyer was suspended for three games.He will miss the Buckeyes’ season opener against Oregon State, as well as games against Rutgers and TCU. He will be permitted to coach the team in practice starting Sept. 2, however.Moments ago, McMurphy chimed in on Twitter, revealing how Ohio State fans have treated him during the process.Now I understand why @KirkHerbstreit moved to Nashville— Brett McMurphy (@Brett_McMurphy) August 23, 2018Herbstreit, a former Buckeye quarterback, had this to say when asked about the move seven years ago. From the The Columbus Dispatch:“Nobody loves Ohio State more than me,” said Herbstreit, a former Buckeyes quarterback. “I still have a picture of Woody Hayes and my dad (Jim, a former OSU player) in my office, and nobody will do more than I do for the university behind the scenes. But I’ve got a job to do, and I’m going to continue to be fair and objective. To continue to have to defend myself and my family in regards to my love and devotion to Ohio State is unfair.”[…]“From a sports perspective, this is rough,” he said. “I love Ohio State. Love the Blue Jackets. Love the Reds. Those are my hobbies. I don’t like moving. I love living here. I don’t want to leave. But I just can’t do this anymore. I really can’t keep going like this.“Eighty to ninety percent of the Ohio State fans are great. It’s the vocal minority that make it rough. They probably represent only 5 to 10 percent of the fan base, but they are relentless.”Unfortunately, it is unsurprising that McMurphy has experienced some of the same things that forced Herbstreit out of his home state. It isn’t an Ohio State-centric problem either. Rabid fan bases are among the things that make college football great, but there is definitely an ugly side to them as well, and it is often exposed with scandals like what we’ve seen at Ohio State this summer.last_img read more

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Casella CEL unveils low cost dBadge Lite noise dosimeter capable of surviving

first_imgCasella CEL has redeveloped its popular lightweight and cable-free dBadge noise dosimeter to increase its robustness, allowing the dosimeter to be used in the harshest of environments with absolute reliability. Owing to its popularity for use in mining applications, the redeveloped dBadge now features rubber over-moulding on the case to further increase toughness, and provide protection from the water and dust prevalent in mines or similar environments.Casella has also added a new model to its noise dosimetry range, the CEL-350L dBadge Lite, which offers simple functionality at a very affordable price. The Lite measures all the same occupational noise parameters as the original dBadge except for the time history of exposure to noise levels, so is ideal for users needing straightforward noise dose results at low cost. Market Manager Tim Turney commented: “The redesign of the dBadge shows Casella CEL’s commitment to continually improving its range of high quality exposure measurement instruments. The addition of the dBadge Lite to the range ensures that cost need not be a deterrent to safety.”last_img read more

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