Judge jails man for nine months after crime spree in Letterkenny

first_imgA Judge has jailed a 21-year-old alcoholic man for nine months after he went on a crime spree in a Co Donegal town.Keith Boyle appeared before Letterkenny District Court charged with a litany of offences arising out of his addiction to alcohol. Boyle, of Derryveagh Avenue, Letterkenny appeared in court already having a total of 49 previous convictions.Judge Paul Kelly said he had warned Boyle last year to “get to grips” with his alcohol issue but he now appeared before him again with new charges.Those charges included making threats with a knife, stealing two mobile phones, possessing a stolen social welfare card, stealing alcohol, threatening staff at a takeaway and stealing alcohol.Other charges included causing €650 of damage to two gaming machines, being involved in a hit and run and public order offences.On one occasion on September 27th, 2017 he went to a house at Thornberry in Letterkenny and told a woman that her son owed him €200 and produced a knife from inside his jacket.When the woman’s husband appeared, he fled in a taxi and later represented himself to Gardai.Less than a month later on October 17th, 2017, he struck a worker at The Grill takeaway on Port Road in Letterkenny when asked to leave and returned a short time later with a piece of timber and smashed a window.Solicitor for the accused, Mr Kieran O’Gorman, said his client had pleaded guilty to all of these offences.He said Boyle was an alcoholic at the age of just 21 years but is trying to sort his addiction and has booke din to see an alcohol counsellor.“He is a very different man that appears here today than when I met him a few months ago. He is trying and he is seeking help,” said Mr O’Gorman.Boyle was supported in court by he mother, sister and other family members.However, Judge Paul Kelly said he had previously seen the same pattern with Boyle and his problems with alcohol.He said “It’s a shocking state of affairs that 21-year-old has 49 convictions. He appeared last year with the same pattern of numerous charges and was dealt with by the court.“There was a litany of offences and that has continued – very often frequently and regularly which he was on bail.“The injured parties are unlikely to recover any of their items or be compensated for any of the damage.“In March last year I told him to use the opportunity to address his alcohol issues and he has had numerous opportunities to address that. I hope he gets to grips with that.“But I have no option but to deal with this by way of custodial sentence.”He sentenced Boyle to a total of nine months on the various charges.Judge jails man for nine months after crime spree in Letterkenny was last modified: September 10th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:courtcrime spreeGardaiKeith Boyleletterkennylast_img read more

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The press in South Africa

first_imgThere are 23 daily and 14 weekly major urban newspapers in South Africa, most published in English. There are also a number of regional and community newspapers, most delivered free of charge, as well as a range of general and specialised news websites.Some 12.4-million South Africans buy the urban dailies, while community newspapers have a circulation of 5.5-million.Sections in this article:Trends in South African newspapers South Africa’s daily newspapersSouth Africa’s weekly newspapersSouth Africa’s news websitesRelated articlesUseful links Trends in South African newspapers South Africa has always had a courageous and opinionated press. For over 40 years the apartheid state tried to gag the country’s newspapers, using legislation, harassment and imprisonment, culminating in the late-1980s States of Emergency. Through all of this, South Africa’s press continued to report on all the news they could.With democracy in 1994, South Africa’s newspapers were freed from all restrictions. The country’s Constitution, adopted in 1996, explicitly protects the freedom of the press in its Bill of Rights. Section 16 states:Everyone has the right to freedom of expression, which includes – freedom of the press and other media; freedom to receive or impart information or ideas; freedom of artistic creativity; and academic freedom and freedom of scientific researchThe right in subsection (1) does not extend to- propaganda for war; incitement of imminent violence; oradvocacy of hatred that is based on race, ethnicity, gender or religion, and that constitutes incitement to cause harm. Reporters Without Borders ranks South Africa at 38 in its 2010 Press Freedom Index. This puts the country ahead of France (44), Italy (49), and the US (99).The development of the South African press since the end of apartheid has shown two significant trends: the stagnation and decline of the traditional mainstream newspapers, and the phenomenal growth of papers with a black, working class readership.The stagnation of South Africa’s mainstream press, which traditionally had a wealthy white readership, mirrors the trend in established newspapers in developed countries across the world. This stagnation is generally attributed to the growth of the internet since the dotcom crash of 2001, with more and more of those who can choosing to find their news online instead of on the printed page.On the other hand the opposite trend, the remarkable growth of newspaper readership in the lower end of the market, is a phenomenon seen in developing countries such as India and China. This is due to the vast improvement in the living standards in South Africa’s poorest communities, the major beneficiaries of change in this country. Their living conditions and general standard of living changed almost overnight as access to housing, electricity, running water, job opportunities and minimum wages came sweeping through under a new democratic government.In this vast new readership one paper stands out: Daily Sun. Launched in 2002 to fill the enormous gap in the newspaper market, this tabloid has seen its circulation rise from 78 000 in its first year to 513 291 in the first quarter of 2009 – and that is just copies sold. Its readership has increased from under half a million to 5-million for the period between January and December 2010 (South African Advertising Research Foundation).Daily Sun’s success has led to an increasing “tabloidisation” of South Africa’s newspaper industry, with a number of new tabloids being launched. These include the Afrikaans-language Son and English-language Daily Voice, both targeting working class coloured and, to a lesser extent, white readers in the Western Cape.Back to the top South Africa’s daily newspapers Note: Circulation: Number of copies sold. Data sourced from the Audit Bureau of Circulations South Africa (ABC) circulation figures for October to December 2010. Readers: Number of people who read the newspaper. Data sourced from the South African Advertising Research Foundation‘s All Media Products Survey (Amps) Average Issue Readership of Newspapers and Magazines, January 2010 to December 2010. Beeld Beeld is an Afrikaans-language daily, printed six days a week and distributed in Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Northern Province and KwaZulu-Natal. First published in 1974, the paper is owned by Media24.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Media24 Editor: Tim du PlessisLanguage: AfrikaansCirculation: 85 004Readers: 506 000Circulation – Weekend Beeld: 83 800Readers – Weekend Beeld: 114 000Die Burger Afrikaans-language daily Die Burger, first published in 1915, is the biggest daily newspaper in the Western Cape, with separate editions for the Eastern and Western Cape. The paper is owned by Media24.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Media24 Editor: Bun BooyensLanguage: AfrikaansCirculation: 69 956Readers: 490 000Circulation – Saturday Burger: 77 800Readers – Saturday Burger: 194 000Business Day As its name suggests, Business Day is a dedicated business newspaper, reporting on corporate news, black economic empowerment, economic policy, corporate governance and financial markets. It is owned by BDFM Publishers, a division of Avusa, and Avusa’s partner, London-based Pearson Plc.Website TwitterOwned by: AvusaEditor: Peter BruceLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 36 110Readers: 76 000Business Report Launched in 1995, Business Report is South Africa’s second financial daily, edited in Johannesburg but printed in three cities. It is inserted in all Independent Newspapers’ morning titles in Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban and Pretoria.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Jabulani SikhakhaneLanguage: EnglishCape Argus Independent Newspapers’ Cape Argus is an afternoon daily aimed at middle- to upper-income readers in Cape Town. Its readership consists of all races.Website TwitterOwned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Chris WhitfieldLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 63 200Readers: 349 000Circulation – Saturday Argus: 48 050Readers – Saturday Argus: 213 000Circulation – Sunday Argus: 27 980Readers – Sunday Argus: 145 000Cape Times Independent Newspapers’ Cape Times, a daily published since 1876, aims at the middle classes of Cape Town. It has a mainly white and coloured readership.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor:  Alide DasnoisLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 42 710Readers: 268 000The Citizen The Citizen is published six days a week and distributed mainly in Gauteng. The newspaper is owned by CTP/Caxton.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Caxton Acting editor: Martin WilliamsLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 69 036Readers: 370 000Circulation – Saturday Citizen: 44 080Readers – Saturday Citizen: 181 000Daily Dispatch The first issue of the East London Daily Dispatch was published in 1898. The newspaper is the Eastern Cape’s biggest selling daily, with a Xhosa and English supplement published on Wednesdays. The Dispatch was edited by Donald Woods from 1965 until his arrest and banning in 1977 for exposing government responsibility for the death of Steve Biko. It is owned by Avusa.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Avusa Editor: Mpumelelo Mkhabela  Language: EnglishCirculation: 27 200Readers: 269 000Circulation – Saturday Dispatch: 22 240Readers – Saturday Dispatch: 148 000Daily News Independent Newspapers’ Daily News, first published in 1878 as the Natal Mercantile Advertiser, is targeted at the middle market of Durban and the rest of KwaZulu-Natal.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Allen DunnLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 37 110Readers: 430 000Daily Sun Daily Sun is by far and away the largest newspaper in South Africa, and the first aimed at the black working class. A tabloid initially met with disdain by the established press, its huge sales – and the fact that it has made new newspaper readers out of millions of South Africans – have earned it respect. It offers more local news and gossip, focusing on events in ordinary people’s lives rather than national and international news.Website Owned by: Media24 Editor: Themba KhumaloLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 414 280Readers: 5 023 000Daily Voice The Daily Voice, an Independent Nespapers publication, is a tabloid aimed mainly at blue-collar workers of the Cape Flats. With its pay-off line “sex, scandal, skinder (gossip) and sport” the newspaper is unashamedly a South African take on UK tabloids such as the Sun. It is published in English – with plenty of Afrikaans slang thrown in – and was launched to compete with Son, Media24’s successful Afrikaans-language tabloid.Website: noneOwned by: Independent Newspaper Group Acting editor: Elliot SylvesterExecutive editor: Karl BrophyLanguage: EnglishReaders: 585 000Diamond Fields Advertiser Established in 1878, Independent Newspapers’ Diamond Fields Advertiser is based in Kimberley and targets the communities of the sparsely populated Northern Cape.Website: noneFacebookOwned by: Independent Newspaper Group Managing editor: Johan du PlessisLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 9 750Readers: 70 000The Herald Founded in 1845 as the Eastern Province Herald, the Herald is one of South Africa’s oldest newspapers. Its first edition – four pages – came out on 7 May 1845 and cost one penny. The Herald is owned by Avusa and distributed in the Eastern Cape, with its main base in Port Elizabeth.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Avusa Editor: Heather RobertsonLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 22 390Readers: 256 000Isolezwe Isolezwe is the premier isiZulu newspaper, published Mondays to Fridays. The paper has also launched the first Zulu-language website in the world. It is owned by Independent Newspapers.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Mazwi XabaLanguage: isiZuluCirculation: 100 790Readers: 696 000The MercuryThe Mercury, published since 1852, is Durban’s morning newspaper. It is owned by Independent Newspapers. Its readership is 47% white, 18% black and the rest coloured and Indian.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Angela QuintalLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 33 330Readers: 275 000New AgeLaunched in December 2010, the New Age is a daily national newspaper published by TNA Media. The online version launched earlier, in September of the same year. The New Age is pro-government, but is said to have no formal ties with any political party. It’s also claimed to be “constructively critical”, according to former Minister in the Presidency Essop Pahad.WebsiteOwned by: TNA MediaEditor: Henry JeffreysLanguage: EnglishPretoria News Pretoria News, first published in 1898, is Independent Newspapers’ daily in the capital city. Mainly sold in Gauteng, it is also distributed in Mpumalanga and North West. Some 65% of its readers are black and 33% white.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Zingisa MkhumaLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 24 820Readers: 105 000Circulation – Weekend Pretoria News: 14 710Readers – Weekend Pretoria News: 37 000Son The world’s first Afrikaans tabloid, Son emulates British papers such as the Sun, focusing on scandal, gossip, entertainment and sport – and page three girls. The paper appears in four regional editions: Western Cape, Eastern Cape, Northern Cape and the central South African region. In the Western Cape province, it appears as a daily; in other provinces, it is a weekly paper. Son is owned by Media24.Website Owned by: Media24 Editor in Chief: Andrew KoopmanLanguage: AfrikaansCirculation: 115 100Readers: 1 039 000Circulation – Weekend Kaapse Son: 65 080Readers – Weekend Kaapse Son: 390 000Sowetan Sowetan is Daily Sun’s main competition, also aimed at an English-literate black readership. Initially distributed as a weekly free sheet in Soweto, the paper was transformed into a daily in 1981 to fill the void left by the Post, which was deregistered by the apartheid government. Sowetan is owned by Avusa.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Avusa Editor in Chief: Bongani KeswaLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 125 490Readers: 1 522 000The Star The Star is published in Johannesburg and distributed throughout South Africa, with most sales in Gauteng. Once aimed exclusively at the white market, today over 50% of the Star’s readers are black. It is owned by Independent Newspapers. Launched in Grahamstown in the Eastern Cape in 1887 as the Eastern Star, the paper moved to Johannesburg in 1889.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Moegsien WilliamsLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 143 080Readers: 574 000Circulation – Saturday Star: 105 030Readers – Saturday Star: 291 000The Times The Times was launched in 2007. The sister paper to the Sunday Times, it has a unique and experimental form of circulation: it is not available for sale, but rather is distributed free of charge to the Sunday Times’s 127 000 subscribers, from Monday to Friday. In tabloid format, it carries news that can be read in 20 minutes. It ties heavily into the Times website, providing additional content such as blogs, podcasts and video online.Website FacebookOwned by: Avusa Editor: Phylicia OppeltLanguage: EnglishReaders: 331 000Volksblad First published in 1904, Volksblad is the oldest Afrikaans daily in the country and the largest in the Free State and Northern Cape. It is owned by Media24.Website Owned by: Media24 Editor: Ainsley MoosLanguage: AfrikaansCirculation: 22 110Readers: 162 000Circulation – Saturday Volksblad: 19 070Readers – Saturday Volksblad: 62 000The Witness South Africa’s oldest newspaper, the Witness, serves English readers throughout KwaZulu-Natal, with most of its readers in greater Pietermaritzburg and inland KwaZulu-Natal. Owned by Media24, it was formerly known as the Natal Witness.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Media24 Editor:  Fikile-Ntsikelelo MoyaLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 19 750Readers: 152 000Circulation – Saturday Witness: 22 250Readers – Saturday Witness: 171 000Back to the topSouth Africa’s weekly newspapers Note: Circulation: Number of copies sold. Data sourced from the Audit Bureau of Circulations South Africa (ABC) circulation figures for October to December 2010. Readers: Number of people who read the newspaper. Data sourced from the South African Advertising Research Foundation‘s All Media Products Survey (Amps) Average Issue Readership of Newspapers and Magazines, January 2010 to December 2010. City Press First published in 1982 as Golden City Press, City Press is aimed at the black market. Its name was changed in 1983 by its owners, Jim Bailey and the South African Associated Newspapers. Media24 acquired the paper in 1984. It is published on Sundays.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Media24 Editor: Ferial HaffajeeLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 152 910Readers: 1 867 000Independent on Saturday The Independent on Saturday caters for the KwaZulu-Natal market. It is published by Independent Newspapers. Its readership is 47% Indian, 33% white and 15% black.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Clyde BawdenLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 48 160Readers: 280 000Isolezwe nge SontoLaunched on 30 March 2008, the newspaper is the Sunday edition of the daily distributed Isolezwe.  Its first ABC quarter figures proved it to be very popular in Durban.  It is a tabloid targeted at the Zulu-speaking middle class market in Kwazulu-Natal, and is owned by Independent Newspapers.WebsiteOwned by: Independent Newspaper GroupEditor: Mazwi XabaLanguage: isiZuluCirculation: 74 920Readers: 755 000Mail & GuardianMail & Guardian, formerly the Weekly Mail, was established in 1985 at the height of resistance to apartheid. When foreign donor funding started drying up for anti-apartheid organisations in the late 1980s, many of the country’s alternative newspapers – notably Grassroots, South, New African and New Nation – folded. The Weekly Mail, however, struck up a partnership with the Guardian of London, ensuring the paper’s continued existence. Today, Zimbabwean entrepreneur Trevor Ncube’s company, Newtrust Company Botswana Limited, has a majority share of 87.5% in Mail & Guardian, with the Guardian holding a 10% stake.Website TwitterOwned by: Mail & Guardian MediaEditor: Nic DawesLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 50 230Readers: 428 000Post Post was launched in the mid-1950s as “a racy read, spiced with sex, soccer and news”. Targeted at the Indian communities of KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng, it is owned by Independent Newspapers. Post is published on Wednesdays, with the leisure and sport Weekend Post appearing on Fridays.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Khalil AniffLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 46 490Readers: 429 000Rapport Rapport is South Africa’s national Afrikaans Sunday newspaper. It is distributed countrywide and in Namibia. Owned by Media24, Rapport has the biggest Afrikaans-language market penetration in South Africa.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Media24 Editor: Liza AlbrechtLanguage: AfrikaansCirculation: 242 310Readers: 1 396 000Soccer Laduma A specialist soccer newspaper published on a Wednesday, Soccer Laduma is aimed primarily at young lower-income black men – 87% of its readership is male. It is published by Media24.Website TwitterOwned by: Media24 Editor: Clint RoperLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 313 460Readers: 2 925 000Son The world’s first Afrikaans tabloid, Son emulates British papers such as the Sun, focusing on scandal, gossip, entertainment and sport – and page three girls. The paper appears in four regional editions: Western Cape, Eastern Cape, Northern Cape and the central South African region. It is owned by Media24 and published on Sundays3.Website Owned by: Media24 Editor in Chief: Andrew KoopmanLanguage: AfrikaansCirculation: 65 080 (Sunday)Readers: 389 000 (Sunday)Sunday Independent The Sunday Independent was established in 1995 and aims at readers in the higher-income bracket. Its main sales are in KwaZulu-Natal, Gauteng and the Northern Cape. Its readers are 47% black, 29% black, 11% coloured and 13% Indian. It is owned by Independent Newspapers.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Jovial RantaoLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 40 100Readers: 243 000Sunday Sun Established at the beginning of 2002 and aimed at black readers, Sunday Sun publishes content .largely of a tabloid natur Much of its audience are first-time newspaper readers. Owned by Media24 and published by RCP Media, Sunday Sun is sold countrywide as well as in Botswana, Lesotho and Swaziland.Website: noneOwned by: Media24 Managing editor: Minette FerreiraLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 227 040Readers: 2 371 000Sunday Times Avusa’s Sunday Times is South Africa’s biggest Sunday newspaper, read by 3.8-million people. The paper includes Sunday Times Magazine, Lifestyle, Business Times and Metro sections. Established in 1906, the Sunday Times is distributed all over South Africa and in neighbouring countries such as Lesotho, Botswana and Swaziland.Website FacebookOwned by: Avusa Editor: Ray HartleyLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 462 370Readers: 3 800 000Sunday Tribune The Sunday Tribune caters for KwaZulu-Natal readers. Its is published by Independent Newspapers.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Philani MgwabaLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 86 200Readers: 624 000Sunday World The Sunday World, launched in 1999, is a tabloid aimed mainly at black readers. Owned by Avusa, it is distributed in Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and North West.Website Owned by: Avusa Editor: Wally MbheleLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 151 720Readers: 1 680 000Weekend Post Published on a Saturday, the Weekend Post is the major regional weekend newspaper in the Eastern Cape, with its core market in Port Elizabeth. It is owned by Avusa.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Avusa Editor: Jeremy McCabeLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 24 510Readers: 218 000Back to the topSouth Africa’s news websites Independent Online The Independent Newspaper group’s news portal. Full local and international news, plus sections on business, sport, property, careers, technology, travel and more.News24 Media24’s online news portal, in partnership with several newspapers such as Beeld, Die Burger, City Press and Rapport. Full local and international news, plus sections on business, sport, science, motoring and more.Mail & Guardian Online One of the first news sites in Africa, this web companion for the weekly Mail & Guardian newspaper is updated daily with local, business and sports news, and features all the M&G’s insight and analysis, as well as links to The Teacher (the newspaper of the teaching profession), and more.Business Day More than just business news here – the newspaper’s site provides local, world & sports updates, as well online financial calculators and personalised listings of JSE share prices via e-mail.SABCnews.com News site of the South African Broadcasting Corporation. Specialises in breaking news from South Africa and the world, and provides links to audio and video bulletins.Die Burger Die Burger’s site updates breaking news throughout the day. A comprehensive local and international news portal, with all the sections, specials, features and interactivity we’ve come to expect from South African news sites.The Times The Times is the sister publication to South Africa’s best-selling Sunday paper, the Sunday Times. Its approach is to blur the line between print and electronic media, serving up not only news, business and sport, but blogs, podcasts and plenty of video.Business Report Independent Newspapers’ business site provides the top stories and features covering media, marketing and IT.Finance24 Media24’s business site contains breaking news, the latest financial indicators, company results and more.NetAssets Personal finance site pulling material from the Avusa stable. Updated regularly, providing the latest news, market reports, investment advice and a variety of handy online tools.Moneyweb Independent investment information, news, features, analysis and resources.Financial Mail Online features from the magazine. A search facility and archive of back issues makes this a handy business research resource.ITWeb Excellent, comprehensive, continually updating IT, Internet and technology news site.Bizcommunity Advertising and marketing news site.Back to the topRelated articles The media in South AfricaSouth Africa onlineSouth African televisionRadio in South AfricaSouth Africa’s commercial radio stationsSouth Africa’s public broadcasting radio stationsSouth Africa’s community radio stationsUseful links African Editors Forum Audit Bureau of Circulations South Africa Freedom of Expression Institute Institute for the Advancement of Journalism Avusa Journalism.co.za Media Development and Diversity Agency Media Institute of Southern Africa Media24 Press Ombudsman of South Africa Print Media South AfricaSouth African Advertising Research Foundation South African National Editors Forum 36 116 (ABC April-June 2010)last_img read more

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South Africa’s growing political maturity

first_imgJustice MalalaOne of the great myths of the new South Africa is the belief that, with time, we will go the route of “all Africa”.This route, the myth goes, is the descent into dictatorship, the free-fall into hunger and poverty and the collapse of institutions such as an independent and vigorous judiciary, free press and civil society.“Surely even you have to admit,” I am often confronted by people, “that what is happening to us is pretty much what happened in Nigeria, Kenya, and so forth.”The volume about the impending implosion of South Africa has increased phenomenally since December 2007 when Jacob Zuma defeated Thabo Mbeki in Polokwane for the presidency of the African National Congress (ANC). With the arrival of Zuma and the new corps of ANC leaders, the myth has now taken on a bit of an all-encompassing truth. It is the easy answer to a far more complex question about where South Africa is headed.But let us look at these myths and test their veracity.In January, for example, Kenya became the great example of where South Africa might be headed. Kenya had held national elections in December and these had been blatantly stolen by the incumbent president, Mwai Kibaki.The people of Kenya, rightly, felt violated. They took to the streets in protest and the State – in typical dictatorial fashion – lashed back with violence. By the end of January some 1500 people had died, thousands injured and hundreds of thousands had been misplaced.Could South Africa go the same way as Kenya? The truth is that the people of Kenya have never known true democracy until last Christmas. Jomo Kenyatta, the first post-colonial president, was in power from 1963 to 1978. Such a long period in leadership breeds a certain culture: that people are to leadership born and the populace has no choices.Kenyatta’s successor, Daniel Arap Moi, stayed in power for 24 years! By the end of his tenure (he was pushed out screaming and shouting) the people of Kenya surely must have lost all sense of democratic instinct.Let’s look at another country. Zimbabwe to the north of us gained its independence in 1980. It has had only one president, Robert Mugabe, since then. It is my humble opinion that any country that is ruled with an iron fist by one individual for 28 years is likely to find itself facing the challenges Zimbabwe now faces.So then let us contrast this history with South Africa since 1994. Nelson Mandela came to power in April 1994 and stayed for a single five-year term. This is something unheard of on the continent: most liberators stayed on for longer and many had to be deposed. Surely Mandela’s decision is an example for the whole world?After Mandela, in 1999, came Thabo Mbeki. At the end of September 2008, with about nine months of his second term left, the African National Congress recalled Mbeki and replaced him with its deputy president Kgalema Motlanthe.Now think about. In just less than fifteen years South Africa is into its third president! The recall of Mbeki was done without fuss, rancour or bloodshed. It was as smooth as when former British Prime Minister Tony Blair was recalled by his Labour Party and the reins handed over to the country’s current PM Gordon Brown.“The process shows the maturity of our democratic developmental state. We are an example to the rest of the continent and particularly the subcontinent, that a peaceful transition of power is possible.“People must not panic. There will be no chaos, political maturity will prevail,” said Khotso Khumalo, the ANC’s parliamentary spokesman, when Mbeki was recalled.The Financial Times, a newspaper regarded as the Bible of capitalism the world over, said after Mbeki’s recall that the ANC “should be commended for showing signs of democratic health – a rare sentiment in a former African liberation movement”.It is worth noting that the ANC is putting Zuma forward as its presidential candidate for the 2009 general elections. If the party wins these elections, then South Africa will be into its fourth president in just fifteen years. If another party – say the opposition Democratic Alliance – wins those elections instead, the same will be true.So, compared to many states all over the world, our turnover of heads of state is actually very healthy indeed. And we know what a change in head of state means: new energy in government, new Cabinet ministers keen to prove their abilities and the entrenchment of a philosophy that no person is born to perpetual leadership.It is very easy to fall back on stereotypes of where an African country such as ours is going. But the truth is far more complex and challenging to all our stereotypes. Sure, we have our challenges.But a stereotypical African basket case we are not. Indeed, democracy is entrenching itself in our beloved country. And that is good for all of us.Justice Malala is an award-winning former newspaper editor, and is now general manager of Avusa’s stable of 56 magazines. He writes weekly columns for The Times newspaper and Financial Mail magazine, as well as a monthly media and politics column for Empire magazine. He is the resident political analyst for independent television channel e.tv and has consulted extensively for financial institutions on South African political risk. Malala was also an executive producer on Hard Copy I and II, a ground-breaking television series on SABC 3. Hard Copy I won the Golden Horn Award for best television series. Malala’s work has been published internationally in the Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, Financial Times, The Independent, Forbes, Institutional Investor, The Age and The Observer.last_img read more

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Methods to improve cash flow

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Brian E. RavencraftA method to address the reduction of unnecessary costs is to first establish which activity of the farm operation generates those costs.Step 1: Identify activities which generate costs and provide no added value.Step 2: Decide if changes to that activity will affect business turnoverAnswer: NO? Then is the activity necessary or adding value?Answer: YES? Cost reduction techniques may have adverse effect on business profitability.Beware: cost cutting can have a long-term negative impact. For some farmers, failure to invest in people, marketing and technology can leave you falling behind your competitors. You are increasingly likely to provide a product and service of inferior quality. You will also be likely to experience above-average team turnover. And ultimately, your customers have a choice, and you will cease to be it.Deferring payments to suppliers and service providers helps you keep the cash in your pocket longer. Pay your bills on time, but not before they are due. Do however take advantage of discounts offered for payments made before the due date. Better to pay less rather than later. It is also important to keep your suppliers sweet in case you need them to satisfy a rush job. If you have a short-term cash flow problem, it’s often best to talk with your suppliers and negotiate payment terms, rather than annoying them by simply not paying or putting them off with the old “the check’s in the post” line.Thus, make the most of trade credit terms. For farming operations working on credit it does not make commercial sense to pay your bills before the due date. Cash flow: One of the three key measuresThe basis to managing cash flow is to ensure that you measure it — plan for it and prepare. Cash flow forecasting is an essential management tool, allowing you to understand the peaks and troughs of your business and understanding the effect of seasonal variations, credit policies, and balance sheet transactions.The three most important things to measure in a farming business are customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction and cash flow. It’s interesting to note that two of those three are non-financial Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s). When we work with our clients to help them implement KPI systems, we often find that there is a good mixture of financial and non-financial measures that it’s important to measure to manage the business effectively.Below are some budgeting tips that you can try:Be realistic. Business budgeting should be based on numbers that is backed up by sensible expectations. These expectations should be based on both previous business financial performance and projected business developments.Budgeting should be time-bound. Farm budgets should be prepared under a specific timeframe. The budget is most of the time based on the farming business’ fiscal year or you can also project a budget on a monthly or quarterly basis. It is recommended that you break down your budget on a monthly basis even if you have already prepared it on your farming business’ fiscal year. To make your farming budgeting easy, consider using a financial program or software.Make an estimate on your income and expenses. Farmers may use preceding year’s data. Consequently, farmers can also look at current or projected market prices to project estimated income and expenses. You should use what is the most probable, when preparing your budget.  Brian E. Ravencraft, CPA, CGMA is a Principal with Holbrook & Manter, CPAs. Brian has been with Holbrook & Manter since 1995, primarily focusing on the areas of Tax Consulting and Management Advisory Services within several firm service areas, focusing on agri-business and closely held businesses and their owners. Holbrook & Manter is a professional services firm founded in 1919 and we are unique in that we offer the resources of a large firm without compromising the focused and responsive personal attention that each client deserves. You can reach Brian through www.HolbrookManter.com or at BRavencraft@HolbrookManter.com.last_img read more

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Lucknow Metro delay unavoidable, says E. Sreedharan

first_imgThe delay in starting the Lucknow Metro for public use cannot be attributed to the change in political power at the helm of Uttar Pradesh, said noted civil engineer E. Sreedharan, popularly known as the ‘Metro Man’, here on Thursday.Mr. Sreedharan said the transition in power from the Samajwadi Party (SP) to the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in U.P. had no impact on the “planning or schedule” of the Lucknow Metro’s construction. The postponement of the deadline was due to “unavoidable reasons” such as the delay in receiving coaches and timely Railway clearances, he said. He expressed confidence that the Metro rail would be running in the U.P. capital by the third or fourth week of July.Mr. Sreedharan said Metro projects across India were awaiting government clearances as the Centre was finalising a new Metro policy. Work for the Lucknow Metro began in September 2014 and the trial run on its priority corridor was conducted on December 1, 2016. The previous SP government had announced the services would begin on March 26. The target, however, could not be met, with the BJP government criticising the previous Akhikesh Yadav regime for doing things “hastily”. Despite the repeated extension of the deadline, Mr. Sreedharan said the Lucknow Metro could boast of having the fastest first section of any metro be be completed anywhere in the country.last_img read more

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Policeman killed, another injured in militant attack in Anantnag

first_imgOne policeman was killed and another injured in a militant attack in South Kashmir’s Anantnag on Tuesday afternoon.“Militants fired upon a police vehicle in Anantnag’s Bijbehara. The police retaliated the fire. One injured policeman succumbed to injuries in the hospital and another is undergoing a treatment,” said a police spokesman.Deceased policeman was identified as Bilal Ahmed. The injured policeman was identified as Abdul Rashid. The security forces later cordoned off the area and started a combing operation to nab the attackers.BSF jawan killed in JammuIn Jammu, a Border Security Force (BSF) jawan was killed as Pakistani troops opened fire on the International Border (IB) in Samba Sector.”Pakistan rangers violated ceasefire agreement at 1:30 a.m. and resorted to unprovoked firing at the BSF positions. The exchange of fire was on for three hours,” said an official.Deceased BSF constable was identified as Devinder Singh. “Singh suffered injuries in the firing and later succumbed,” the official added.Meanwhile, Inspector General Frontier, BSF, Srinagar, Abhinav Kumar met Governor N.N. Vohra and briefed him about the BSF’s operations in Kashmir and “about the likely pattern of the emerging security scenario”.last_img read more

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