2007 SUMMIT COVERAGE: Businesses must overcome ‘fog’ of pandemic preparedness

first_img See also: Adding to that miasma is the state of US healthcare. In part because of a shortage of workers and the physical limitations of medical centers, the system has little “surge capacity” for the huge influx of patients a pandemic would cause. “We have basically taken [the healthcare] system and sucked it to the bone,” Osterholm said. Maintain flexibility. Osterholm recognized the uncertainty involved in pandemic planning and stressed that plans need malleability so they can adapt to the elusive realities of a pandemic. “Anyone who develops a concrete plan is making a mistake,” he said. “Be capable and be flexible. Another layer of mist comes in the form of making decisions about vaccines and antiviral drugs. Osterholm lauded companies like Roche for increasing production of antiviral drugs like osteltamivir (Tamiflu), but said it remains unclear how effective these drugs will be against H5N1 if it becomes the pandemic strain. How high mortality rates will be Overcome pandemic fatigue. Recognize that some executives may see pandemic planning as no longer important, Osterholm said, calling the phenomenon “pandemic fatigue” and saying, “Acknowledge, accept, and plan around pandemic fatigue.” Osterholm spoke at CIDRAP’s “Business Preparedness for Pandemic Influenza: Second National Summit,” held this week for hundreds of leaders in business, government, and academia. How effective and plentiful antiviral drugs and vaccines will be—and when they’ll be ready Osterholm, director of the University of Minnesota’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), publisher of CIDRAP News, said that several factors cloud the preparedness landscape: Even if companies stockpile antivirals, they face another dilemma: when to use them. If they were to withhold them during a first pandemic wave anticipating a more severe second wave that didn’t happen, people would question the decision, Osterholm said. Likewise, leaders could decide to distribute stockpiled drugs during the first wave, only to discover that the second is more severe. “When do you blow your wad?” he asked. How our communities will mitigate damage “Pre-pandemic” vaccines can be stockpiled in the hope that they may provide some protection against the influenza strain that ultimately causes a pandemic. However, as pointed out by vaccine expert Gregory Poland, MD, in a separate summit presentation Tuesday, a vaccine targeted to the specific pandemic strain would take months to develop and distribute. Feb 7, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Orlando, FL – As businesses develop pandemic preparedness plans, they need to cut through a “fog” of uncertainty about exactly what pandemic influenza will look like and how their companies will be able to respond to it, infectious disease expert Michael Osterholm, PhD, MPH, said at a summit in Orlando Monday. The result, said Osterholm, is that “the availability of protective vaccine during the first wave of a pandemic just won’t be there.” He added, “For most of the world’s population, a vaccine will never be available throughout the duration of a pandemic.” Work around “just in time.” “Don’t try to change the global just-in-time economy,” he said. “That’s like swimming up Niagara Falls. Forget it. You’ve got to work around it.” And with estimates of the mortality rate in a pandemic ranging widely, Osterholm surmised, “We don’t really have a clue” about how many people will succumb. How many waves of the pandemic will occur, and how severe they’ll be Pandemic planning can produce its own haze as planners grapple with issues like ensuring their supply chain or determining government’s role. “We talk about what we might do or can do, but we really don’t know,” Osterholm said. “There are so many uncertainties.” This extends to experts’ estimates of how a pandemic might behave. “We have only a general sense of what the next pandemic influenza strain is capable of doing in terms of human illness or subsequent collateral damage,” he said. Add to that today’s just-in-time economy, in which supplies arrive as they are needed so that companies minimize storage costs. “It is the reality of today’s economy,” Osterholm said. “It’s what MBAs are made of.” That reality, though, means that “even a hiccup” of disruption will mean serious shortages, he predicted. Full text of Feb 2007 HHS report on community mitigation measureshttp://www.pandemicflu.gov/professional/community/community_mitigation.pdf Other steps businesses can take, according to Osterholm, include: “You’re not stuck to a plan,” he said. “You’re stuck to a process.” In addition, said Poland, director of the Mayo Vaccine Research Group in Rochester, Minn., drug companies—even at maximum worldwide production—could deliver only enough vaccine to inoculate 1% to 2% of the world’s population. Shining some light into the pandemic cloud, however, is the recent document on community mitigation measures by the US Department of Health and Human Services (see links below). “You don’t want to have a [pandemic planning] policy inconsistent with this document,” Osterholm said. How our overloaded healthcare systems will cope How our global just-in-time economy will affect access to goods and services He took his “fog of pandemic preparedness” concept from the theory of the “fog of war,” a state of ambiguity soldiers can find themselves in when they doubt their own capabilities and feel unsure of their adversary’s capabilities and intentions. Feb 1 CIDRAP News story: “HHS ties pandemic mitigation advice to severity” Learn from veterans. We need to look at those in the military who have studied the fog of war to explore what to do when unsure about what steps to take.last_img read more

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Community Shield: Unknown facts about Liverpool, Arsenal duel

first_img Loading… Promoted ContentWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?A Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of Art2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?Super Recognizable Outfits That Actors Wore In The Famous Movies10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes20 Amazing Facts About The Daenerys Of The House Of TargaryenThese TV Characters Left The Show And It Just Got Better10 Legendary Historical Movies You Should See6 Best ’90s Action Movies To Watch TodayPlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your Body An opportunity for Liverpool youngsters For the second summer in a row, Liverpool are not spending heavily. Left-back Kostas Tsimikas was brought in because Norwich City were demanding too much for Jamal Lewis . The Reds’ thriftiness grants new opportunities to young faces. In the likes of Rhian Brewster, Neco Williams, Ki-Jana Hoever, Curtis Jones and Harvey Elliott, Klopp has a group of talented starlets who could be capable squad players now rather than later. If any one of them could put in a star turn against Arsenal, it might convince Klopp to keep them close to the first team this coming campaign. After all, Trent Alexander-Arnold’s rise from that same academy to becoming one of the best right-backs in the world seemingly came out of nowhere, too. A potentially new-look Arsenal midfield Arsenal still want Thomas Partey and are turning their attention to Roma’s Amadou Diawara, should that fall through. Dani Ceballos is keen to return but might not; Lucas Torreira is yearning for Italy, still. Matteo Guendouzi looks unlikely to ever return from the naughty step. All in all, only Granit Xhaka can really be counted on for the Gunners – not something that many would’ve believed a while ago. Ahead of today’s match, Mikel Arteta should have a selection headache of sorts; Mohamed Elneny was used in midfield alongside Xhaka against MK Dons, while Joe Willock is an option. Bukayo Saka looks good in midfield too, when played there. Until Arsenal resolve their transfer dealings, Arsenal’s midfielders have a chance to show what they can do. read also:Community Shield: Arsenal, Liverpool ready to battleGomez and Alexander-Arnold keen to impress Both Joe Gomez and Trent Alexander have keen competition for their roles and both will want to prove that they’re the right men for the side. But not at Liverpool. With the recent England squad containing a plethora of right-backs, Alexander-Arnold has a difficult job to establish himself ahead of Southgate’s favourites, Kyle Walker and Kieran Trippier. Keeping Aubameyang quiet will likely go a long way to helping, however; Joe Gomez could do with a titanic performance too, especially with Harry Maguire not around this time in the Nations League. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Klopp’s Liverpool champions face off against Mikel Arteta’s Arsenal FA Cup winners – but this year, the shield feels stranger than ever. Arsenal haven’t played Liverpool in the Community Shield for 18 years. Back then, Frenchmen Arsene Wenger and Gerard Houllier were at the respective wheels; Michael Owen and Thierry Henry were the headliners. Plenty has changed, much for the worse. But at least we don’t let anyone kid themselves that it’s a proper tournament anymore. “This match is more than a friendly,” said Gerard Houllier. “The Community Shield is like a final. There is a trophy at stake and we are the holders.” The idea of Jurgen Klopp yelling at Mohamed Salah to sprint back and help his full-back against Aubameyang is an amusing one. Neither Liverpool nor Arsenal really care that much about the giant dish plate on offer to winner – but the match feels a little different this year for a number of reasons. What exactly can we expect from this year’s curtain-raiser? An even friendlier feel Essentially, the Community Shield exists as an opportunity for the two big winners of last season to build up their match sharpness in a sort-of competitive game, just seven days before the Premier League season kicks off, after three months of rest. This season, there’s been about six weeks of rest, the Premier League kicks off next weekend and the two teams will be heading on an international break after the match. This will have far more of a friendly feel than ever before – as if the Community Shield ever breaks into scuffles – with both Arteta and Klopp able to approach this one with even more license for experimentation. Both managers have stuck to their respective formations in preseasons, but we could see more youngsters brought in and new ideas tested out. Arsenal sat back and soaked up pressure when they last faced the Reds: perhaps they’ll go out and attack a little more this time, since there are no points at stake. Chance to test William Saliba Arsenal’s defence is in dire need of repair. The incoming Gabriel Maghalaes should help in that regard but even if he is signed by Saturday, he’s not likely to feature so sooner. William Saliba, on the other hand, has been loaned out to Saint-Etienne and is more than ready to slot into the Arsenal backline. Keeping Salah, Firmino and Mane at bay will be a baptism of fire for the Frenchman, but it should give fans a chance to see their new man in action. Saliba featured against MK Dons in a friendly the other day. He looks tailor-made for that right-sided centre-back position and though Arsenal are likely to line up with a back three, his physicality will be much-needed at the heart of defence.last_img read more

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Daniel Sebag retires as CFO of Amaya Inc

first_img Submit Share Amaya governance proposes name change to ‘The Stars Group Inc’ May 12, 2017 The new betting ecosystem: sharks, fish, whales and the trawlermen – part 2 September 21, 2018 Further to today’s corporate update on its revised full-year 2016 guidance, the governance of Toronto TSX-listed Amaya Inc has informed stakeholders and the media that Daniel Sebag has retired from his leadership role as Chief Financial Officer (CFO).Sebag leaves Amaya following ten years’ service as Amaya’s first ever CFO. Announcing his departure, Amaya governance stated that Sebag had played a critical role during key stages in the firms history,  helping Amaya transition from a start-up to a global leading online gambling operator through its $5 billion acquisition of Rational Group assets in 2014.Amaya governance has informed that it has begun its executive search for Sebag’s replacement appointing Spencer Stuart as its recruitment lead, advising Amaya boards on candidate selection.Issuing a corporate statement Divyesh Gadhia, Chairman of the Board of Amaya Inc, commented on the departure of Sebag; “Daniel has been a passionate and dedicated steward of Amaya’s growth into a global gaming leader and helping to position it for the future. On behalf of the company”.I would like to thank him for his contributions over the years. We wish him all the best in his retirement.”“I would like to thank him for his contributions over the years. We wish him all the best in his retirement.” StumbleUpon Amaya promotes David Carrion to Director of Marketing for PokerStars June 26, 2017 Share Related Articleslast_img read more

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PRRD looking to create new building bylaw with public consulation

first_imgAfter being repealed earlier this month, the bylaw was reinstated Monday morning at a special meeting, but only applies to building permits issued before November 14, 2013, and for those who make a request to obtain a permit in the future.“This covers the middle ground that I think we’re looking for,” says Alternate Director Byron Stewart in for Director Lori Ackerman. “If people want or do not want to move within this system, they’re free to do so.” In order to bring the bylaw back, the PRRD board had to revote on repealing it, which was opposed but with three rural directors in favour: Area C’s Arthur Hadland, Area E’s Jerrilyn Schembri, and Area D’s Leonard Hiebert, the alternate for Wayne Hiebert, who resigned in October. – Advertisement -Participating in the meeting via telephone, Hadland made it clear that he felt the meeting was out of order, and therefore illegal, as five business days notice were not given, and he felt the issue was not an emergency, which was met with applause by the packed gallery. Much of the discussion during the nearly 90 minute meeting revolved around whether or not rural residents’ ability to obtain financing for construction projects is affected by not having a building inspection process. Advertisement Director Gwen Johansson also raised the issue of there being no end date to the bylaw, given that many residents feel there are many deficiencies. “There are a number of people who may be interested in having a building permit based on that old bylaw in the rural areas where it’s voluntary, but they’re not willing to have it based on the present bylaw,” she maintains. A referendum on the matter is still scheduled for next year’s local government elections. With consultation, it could take six to nine months to come back with a new bylaw based on the boundaries and content of the old Building Bylaw 1189, 1998.Area B Director Karen Goodings and Director Merlin Nichols voted against having a new building bylaw brought forward. “I called the local credit union and they just shrugged. This meant nothing to them,” says Hadland. “I called Farm Credit, which does a lot of the financing in the rural area, and they actually have no interest in our building bylaw at all.” “I fear there’s a huge risk to our region by companies who hear about this and all of a sudden say, ‘We’re not only not going to insure that building that hasn’t been inspected; we’re not going to write any coverage in that area at all,’” later responded Director Dale Bumstead, who served as the Chair of the Lakeview Credit Union board for 10 years. Both Hadland and Director Bruce Christensen wanted to get something in writing from the financial institutions that reportedly rely on inspections from the Regional District, before making a decision on the building bylaw. Chief Administrative Officer Fred Banham attempted to answer some of the other questions that directors had fielded, including that … can not be grandfathered in, and that the existing permits could not be completed anyways, as there was no longer a bylaw to authorize the PRRD’s two inspection officers. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Priyanka Chopra-starrer Mary Kom declared tax free in Maharashtra

first_imgThe biopic on Indian Olympic boxer Mary Kom starring Priyanka Chopra has been declared tax free in Maharashtra.The film has been produced by filmmaker Sanjay Leela Bhansali. “It is wonderful news. We have a compelling story to tell of a strong, determined woman who has done the nation proud. It is our tribute to all the unsung sports people who give so much to see the Indian flag flying high. If this can act as a catalyst of hope for them, then its something we can all be proud of,” Priyanka, who is playing the five-time world champion in ‘Mary Kom’ said in a statement.”We are grateful to Revenue Minister Balasaheb Thorat and government of Maharashtra for lending their support to the film. This exemption right from release day will allow large segments of society to experience the spirit of magnificent Mary,” Ajit Andhare, COO, Viacom18 Motion Pictures (producer) said.Priyanka Chopra in a still from Mary Kom.Bhansali’s spokesperson said the tax free status will encourage audience to recognise and support the spirit of the film.Based on the true story of Mary Kom, the biopic chronicles the journey of a woman boxer who gave up her sporting career when it was at its peak to embrace the joy of motherhood. After giving birth to two beautiful children, she made her comeback in the ring and went on to become both a stronger woman and a stronger boxer. The film directed by Omung Kumar is set to release on September 5.advertisementEarlier, various state governments including Maharashtra, Bihar, UP and others had granted tax exemption to Farhan Akhtar starrer ‘Bhaag Milkha Bhaag’, a biopic on legendary athlete Milkha Singh.last_img read more

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