Wonderful new take on bygone era

first_img28 Chapman Drv, Mysterton 28 Chapman Drv, MystertonTHIS well-appointed home combines the character of a classic Queenslander with all the comforts of modern living.The home, at 28 Chapman St, Mysterton, has been extensively renovated to transform it to a luxurious property with 500sq m of under-roof space. 28 Chapman Drv, MystertonIt’s for sale for between $990,000 to $1,050,000 and has five bedrooms, three bathrooms, three-car accommodation, a study, three living areas and in-ground pool.Owner Kylie Murphy said the home had been meticulously renovated to create their dream family home but they were now reluctantly selling it to relocate to South Australia.“You could say it was a renovator’s delight when we bought it,” Ms Murphy said.“It took us a couple of years to get the plans sorted and then it took another two years to do the renovations from start to finish.More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 202028 Chapman St, Mysterton“We wanted it to still look like a Queenslander on the outside but then you go inside and have it all beautiful and modern.“When we had the renovations done we had no intention of leaving, so we renovated it to turn it into our forever home.”The home is on a 911sq m block with well-established lawns, garden and a bore.The new pool also has an undercover pavilion, while an oversized timber deck connects the indoor and outdoor areas.center_img 28 Chapman St, MystertonAll bedrooms except for one are located on the top level with the master suite featuring his and her walk-in wardrobe along with a luxurious ensuite.The downstairs bedroom has its own external entrance.The stylish kitchen is fitted out with quality appliances and has a walk-in pantry.Selling agent Keyes & Co principal Damien Keyes said the home had been turned into one of Mysterton’s finest Queenslanders.“It still has the genuine Queenslander element but it’s been blended with the new,” he said.“Mysterton always has that prestige element because there has been some significant Queenslanders renovated there over the years.“This home would be great for a family looking to put down roots and buy their forever home because it certainly offers that.”last_img read more

Read More
Schroders: World still heading for 4.1°C rise as climate finance slows

first_imgThe world remains on course for a 4.1°C temperature rise as developments in the oil and gas industry have been offset by a slowdown in low-carbon investments, according to Schroders.Capital investment in the oil and gas industry fell sharply in the last quarter of 2017, the period covered by the asset manager’s update to its climate change tracking analysis. “The oil and gas industry could be starting to translate the growing pressure it is facing into a strategic response,” said Andrew Howard, head of sustainable research at Schroders.“There is further to go but the change is encouraging. Time will tell whether [capital] discipline holds with rising prices.” The asset manager considered that the changes in the oil and gas industry would translate into a projected temperature rise of 3.9°C, down from 5.3°C.However, a marked fall in investment in clean energy technologies offset this effect, according to Schroders.It cited data from Bloomberg New Energy Finance showing that, in late 2017, clean energy investment had fallen to 2010 levels. In October 2017 the Climate Policy Initiative (CPI) released analysis showing a 12% drop in global investment levels for 2016.Howard said: “The challenge of encouraging capital into climate solutions on the necessary scale has attracted a lot of attention from policymakers and environmental groups and, while plans are typically ambitious, tangible action remains more elusive.”Schroders’ ‘Climate Progress Dashboard’ primarily uses data from CPI, a not-for-profit think tank.Keeping the global temperature rise to a maximum of 2°C over pre-industrial levels is the target that governments from around the world set as part of the 2015 Paris Agreement. It is widely agreed by scientists to be the threshold beyond which climate change risks become unacceptable or the impacts too damaging. The text of the Paris Agreement itself refers to keeping temperature increases to a maximum of 2°C and ideally 1.5°C because “this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change”.Schroders’ previous analysis, which was based on various indicators as at the third quarter of last year, also pointed to a 4.1°C temperature increase.In a recent report consultancy firm McKinsey said CO2 emissions would plateau by 2030 and “remain far from a 2°C pathway”.BP’s recent energy outlook outlined the ‘most likely’ trajectory for global energy markets over the next 20 years which, like Schroders’ analysis, was based on various assumptions and judgements.last_img read more

Read More