6 big Warriors watch parties around the SF Bay Area

first_imgOK, Wednesday night’s Dubs game was a debacle, but there’s always hope. Here’s where to watch the next game at sports bars around the Bay Area.Warriors vs. Raptors Game 5 @ Mad Oak: 4-10 pm. June 7 and 10, 135 12th St., Oakland. $20 entry includes two drink tickets. http://bit.ly/2WoSHIdNBA Finals Watch Party: Warriors vs Raptors: 6-9 p.m. June 7 and 10, 13 and 16 (if necessary) , SoMa StrEat Food Park, 428 11th St., San Francisco. Join the largest outdoor viewing party with a DJ, huge TVs, …last_img read more

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Raiders’ pre-camp offensive depth chart

first_imgBubble: Mike GlennonLong shot: Nathan PetermanAnalysis: Nothing to see here except plenty of Carr going into a season which will determine whether he remains … NAPA — The Raiders are younger, faster and more talented on offense. When they begin full-squad practices Saturday, we’ll begin to see if that translates into being much better than the unit that ranked No. 23 in the NFL last season.A look at the offensive depth chart (*projected starter):Quarterbacks (3)Lock: *Derek Carrlast_img read more

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Arabian Knightz Rap the Revolution, MideastTunes Burns the Track

first_imgTags:#music#web *Are there any rapping imams? 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout curt hopkins 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App Related Posts 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… Egyptian hip-hop group Arabian Knightz are the first off the block with a rap to celebrate the ongoing revolution. “Arabian Knightz feat. Lauryn Hill – Rebel (Prod. Iron Curtain).mp3” is the rough mix of a song that bears witness to the awakening of a new sensibility in their country. “Rebel” comes courtesy of a fascinating project called MideastTunes, whose mission is to share “music for social change” from the Middle East online, both among MENA countries and with the wider world. Temperature’s droppin’ at the rotten oasisThe three Cairo-based rappers (yes, the Middle East has rappers as well as imams*), Rush, Sphinx and E-Money, recorded the song in the midst of the uprising and released it, raw, yesterday, the first day the Internet was restored to Egypt. The track is rapped in Arabic and English and is built around a Lauren Hill sample. As it says on their MideastTunes page: “‘Rebel’ is an emotionally empowering song that captures the heart, courage & spirit of the Egyptian people currently embattled in a Revolution against an oppressive leadership.”The track itself is hacked off uncooked and awkward and beautiful. Protest music is at best yawn-inducing and at worst pretentious if it doesn’t deliver its message on an interesting acoustic level. This song does. (Despite HIll’s whiskey delivery, it could use a bit less of her and a bit more AK.) I found myself replaying it half a dozen times – beyond journalistic necessity. As a band alone, Arabian Knightz seem worth keeping an ear out for. As a voice of a revolution, well, that’s putting a hell of a lot of pressure on them, but they certainly captured one moment of it on key and in time. MideastTunesMideastTunes is another product of the whippersnapper-powered Middle Eastern idea machine MideastYouth. It covers the music of the region with a completeness that is pretty near unrivalled and certainly is ahead of the game in knowing how to present it. The site has an in-site music player, search function, and even a radio station, Re-Volt Radio. Users can browse by genre and by country of musical origin. Jordanian house? Yeah boys. Lebanese punk? Don’t mind if I do. During the Iranian protests during the last “election” there, the site was a hotbed of ideas changing hands, moving from ear to ear. The instantaneousness of social media means when a person or people have an idea they can bang it out in a hurry. What remains when time sifts out the products of the revolutions going around is anybody’s guess. For now, Arabian Knightz and MideastTunes is a good place to start. last_img read more

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Technology Trumps Dogma, And Other Open Source Insights

first_imgMassive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Related Posts Matt Asay 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now IT + Project Management: A Love Affaircenter_img Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Tags:#Marten Mickos#Open Source#strategy A few weeks back I asked Marten Mickos (@martenmickos), CEO of Eucalyptus Systems, to comment on the changing face of open source. He did, and with the usual Mickos style. Unfortunately, a whole lot of great commentary had to be cut for space reasons.Given the brilliant insights Mickos offered, I wanted to share his comments in their entirety here. Mickos helped make MySQL arguably the most popular database on the planet, and is trying to achieve similar success with an open source cloud offering.With a string of successes—and failures—under his belt, Mickos had multiple pearls of open source wisdom to share. For instance while open-source developers have long eschewed corporate influence on open-source projects, Mickos starts by reminds us that money is critical for funding development, not to mention marketing, documentation, etc. The myth of a peace-loving, cashless open source existence is just that: a myth.On the importance of money to open source…Without money, open source will die.On the foundational principle behind open source business strategy…Some people will spend any amount of time to save money. Some will spend money to save time.On the changing face of the open source developer…Back then it seemed that open source developers were true cowboys—out on their own, following their own individual paths, valuing their nearly unlimited freedom. Today, many open source developers are happy to be salaried employees of companies that don’t really stand for open source on a corporate level (Google, HP, IBM, Oracle, etc.). When they make public presentations, they have to state that what they say is their own opinion and not necessarily an official statement of the company they represent. There is a voluntary submissiveness today that wasn’t as common before.On the role of copyleft licensing and governance…The purpose of the FOSS license and the governance model is not really to enable like-minded people to collaborate, although that’s a benefit too. It’s about enabling unlike-minded people to collaborate. The beauty of open source is that people who dislike each other can produce code for the same product.On leadership…Even in a meritocracy, even in peer-production models, people look for leaders.On critical feedback…If you, on a sustaining basis, can truly love harsh feedback and if you can truly show enthusiasm and appreciation for contributions of whatever magnitude and type, you can be wonderfully successful in open source.When people complain about your open source project, you need to hear them as saying “I would love to love you, but right now I cannot.”If nobody is opposed to your open source product/project, you are not really being popular. [This jibes well with my own observations of haters being a leading indicator of success.]On the role of branding…More than a question of licensing, it’s a question of branding. Red Hat took their open source brand “Red Hat” and made it commercial only. Then they established Fedora as the non-commercial brand. MySQL and JBoss did the opposite: they kept one unified brand for both community and commercial use. When you fork, you must use a different name, because branding is not included in the open source licenses.On apparent inconsistencies in open source “theology”…Open source people can be dogmatic, especially about others. They will eagerly demand that some project behave in this or that way for reasons of orthodoxy and purity. But they will at the same time merrily use closed systems such as iBooks because they admire those products. Technology trumps dogma. Coolness is key. All of this I say not as a complaint, but as an observation. To succeed in open source, you must learn to live with it and make the most of it.On changes to open source in the past 10 years…People didn’t know what it was, how it worked, why people did it, how it could produce great software, why it wouldn’t self-die, etc. That’s why the LAMP stack made it onto the front page of Fortune Magazine—it was so new and intriguing. Today people know open source and they know it’s an essential part of the software world.Incumbents fought it. Now they embrace it (or at least pretend to).Those who did open source just did it. There were very few people blogging about the meaning of open source, thinking about the business models, etc. Today you have those who code, those who lead communities, those who test, those who use, those who make money, those who write about it, etc.Licensing was a big issue then, for good reasons. Now it’s much less of a topic.Back then it was relatively few projects with relatively few people in them. Today there are probably 100-1000X the number of projects.Back then the infrastructure didn’t exist. Today we have Wiki, Github, Jira and other services that make it obvious how to run and govern an open source project.Ten years ago people would download distributions. Now they upload images (to the cloud).On what hasn’t changed in open source over the past 10 years…Still a lot of unbridled enthusiasm, often bordering on naïveté—with all the amazing upsides and inevitable downsides that this will bring.Open source still attracts outstanding talent.The most successful open source projects are those that target developers. Products that are supposed to be used by consumers or other non-technical people generally don’t do as well. But there are notable exceptions, as always, such as Firefox, Android and perhaps OpenOffice.last_img read more

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Lucknow Metro delay unavoidable, says E. Sreedharan

first_imgThe delay in starting the Lucknow Metro for public use cannot be attributed to the change in political power at the helm of Uttar Pradesh, said noted civil engineer E. Sreedharan, popularly known as the ‘Metro Man’, here on Thursday.Mr. Sreedharan said the transition in power from the Samajwadi Party (SP) to the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in U.P. had no impact on the “planning or schedule” of the Lucknow Metro’s construction. The postponement of the deadline was due to “unavoidable reasons” such as the delay in receiving coaches and timely Railway clearances, he said. He expressed confidence that the Metro rail would be running in the U.P. capital by the third or fourth week of July.Mr. Sreedharan said Metro projects across India were awaiting government clearances as the Centre was finalising a new Metro policy. Work for the Lucknow Metro began in September 2014 and the trial run on its priority corridor was conducted on December 1, 2016. The previous SP government had announced the services would begin on March 26. The target, however, could not be met, with the BJP government criticising the previous Akhikesh Yadav regime for doing things “hastily”. Despite the repeated extension of the deadline, Mr. Sreedharan said the Lucknow Metro could boast of having the fastest first section of any metro be be completed anywhere in the country.last_img read more

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