Minesto installs MGS buoy off Wales

first_imgMinesto has completed the installation of the micro-grid system (MGS) buoy that will be used for the company’s first tidal energy installation in Holyhead Deep, off the coast of North West Wales.Moored to the seabed using three anchor lines, the offshore buoy designed for extreme sea conditions will provide data and communications with Minesto’s DG500 marine energy power plant, according to Minesto.It will also act as a floating micro-grid system, facilitating grid compatibility testing by handling and analyzing electricity generated by the 500kW device.The MGS buoy has been designed and constructed by Malin Group in Glasgow and was towed down the River Clyde and the Irish Sea to Minesto’s Holyhead Deep site. The MGS buoy in Holyhead Deep (Photo: Minesto)last_img read more

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Chelsea owner net worth plummet by £2.4bn

first_img Promoted ContentWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More8 Addictive And Fun Coffee Facts6 Major TV Characters We Were Relieved To See Leaving The ShowTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The WorldWhat Happens When You Eat Eggs Every Single Day?Who Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?You’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The Universe7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty Penny7 Truly Incredible Facts About Black Holes The Eclipse has two pools, a submarine and even a missile defence system. Or if he’d prefer to stay on dry land, Abramovich could nestle away in one of his many homes around the globe. His property portfolio adds up to more than £340million and includes mansions in London, a Carribean party pad, a French chateau and even a James Bond villain-style ski lodge. But he will not be heading to his homes in the English capital as he has not set foot in Britain since the Government failed to renew his Visa in May 2018. Read Also:Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich’s daughter Sofia looking for love Despite not attending Stamford Bridge anymore, Abramovich keeps a close eye on Frank Lampard and Co. SunSport revealed this week that the billionaire could have bought Arsenal before he splashed the cash on Chelsea – but was told they were not for sale. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Roman Abramovich’s net worth has fallen by a whopping £2.4billion already this year. The global outbreak of coronavirus has left the Chelsea owner out of pocket – but luckily he still sits on a fortune of around £10.95billion. According to the Moscow Times, Russia’s top billionaires have lost a combined total of £50.6billion in 2020. President Vladimir Putin is said to have lost £2.8billion, while Abramovich has parted ways with just over £2.4billion. The 53-year-old, who has owned Chelsea since 2003, has suffered the effects that coronavirus has had on the financial market. But the Russian-Israeli businessman has plenty to fall back on. He might decide to take a trip out to sea on his £1bn super-yacht to take his mind off of his plummeting net worth.center_img Loading… last_img read more

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Bubak is best in URSS Bob Salem Memorial finale

first_imgJake Bubak’s late charge to the front landed him the top check on night two of Oberlin Speed­way’s Bob Salem Memorial main event for the United Rebel Sprint Series. (Photo by Steve Towery)By David Smith Jr.OBERLIN, Kan. (Aug. 20) – Colorado’s Jake Bubak took the lead with two laps remaining to claim the United Rebel Sprint Series checkers on the final night of the annual Bob Salem Memorial Sun­day at Oberlin Speedway.Bubak passed Zach Blurton for the runner-up position with five laps to go then caught the rear bumper of leader Taylor Velasquez with three laps remaining. One lap later, Bubak completed a slide job in turn one and led the last two times around the track to capture a $1,022 payday and his second URSS victory of the season.Velasquez settled for second while Nick Haygood came home third. Jed Werner came home fourth and earned $1,500 bonus for being the two-day point champion. Ty Williams rounded out the top five while Blurton rebounded from an earlier excursion off the top of the track to finish sixth.Nate Berry came from his 19th starting position to finish seventh and claim the overall Keizer Alumi­num Wheels hard charger award for the two-day event and an additional $500 from Law­rence Marshall Trucking.The $100 hard luck award went to Toby Chapman when his exceptional weekend came to an end while leading after a tangle with a lapped car before midway of the 30-lapper.Feature results – 1. Jake Bubak; 2. Taylor Velasquez; 3. Nick Haygood; 4. Jed Werner; 5. Ty Williams; 6. Zach Blurton; 7. Nate Berry; 8. Tracey Hill; 9. Steven Richardson; 10. Lonnie Cox; 11. Buddy Tubbs; 12. Craig Jecha; 13. John Webster; 14. Justin Fifield; 15. Kaden Taylor; 16. Todd Plemons; 17. Monty Ferriera; 18. Scott Cochran; 19. Toby Chapman; 20. Austin McLean.last_img read more

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‘Walk’ signs help Jews observe High Holy Days

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! As Jews across the city observe Yom Kippur beginning at sundown today, the city’s traffic lights will help them mark the occasion. The city has programmed some of its traffic signals so pedestrians won’t have to push the button to change the lights, a nod to those Jews who refrain from all worklike activities during the high holy days. “It’s a way we’re trying to accommodate all the users of our street system,” said John Fisher, assistant general manager of the Los Angeles Department of Transportation. “It’s something we’ve always done.” Jewish leaders welcome the tech-savvy feature, saying it enables worshippers to attend services without having to jaywalk or wait endlessly for the light to change. “It’s immediately seen as an appreciative accommodation – a sensitive accommodation – to the religious community, because we’re not going to push buttons to change those lights,” said Rabbi Aron Tendler of Congregation Shaarey Zedek in North Hollywood, where 1,500 Orthodox families live. “You’re talking about 1,000 people crossing the street in this little area. What do you want them to do? Stand at the street corner waiting for the cars to trip the signal?” he said. “It just makes sense to accommodate that kind of population if it can be done.” Practicing Orthodox Jews and those who are more Conservative refrain from routine activities on the holy days and weekly Sabbath so they can focus on spiritual issues. They don’t drive or cook, and they particularly refrain from using electricity to heed the traditional ban on lighting fire. That leaves thousands of Jewish residents in Orthodox neighborhoods such as North Hollywood, Fairfax and West L.A. to walk to synagogues for services. When they come to intersections with traffic signals, they’re prohibited from pushing the button to trigger the light to green so they can cross the street. “It’s not that you’re not allowed to push buttons, it’s that one is not permitted to be involved in a certain type of creative work. It happens to be that turning switches and pushing a button fall into that category,” said Rabbi Aaron Abend of Chabad of North Hollywood Saara Ratner-Stauber Synagogue. “The spirit of the day is to be less involved in the mundane and more involved in the godly, divine, spiritual.” In all, 51 intersections across the city – including 17 in the San Fernando Valley – have traffic lights programmed to turn to green with each cycle, rather than when a car approaches. The signals are set to automatically change on seven holy days during the year, including Yom Kippur. They also automatically change on the weekly Sabbath, which is from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. Additionally, the signals give pedestrians about 30 seconds to cross the street instead of the usual five to nine seconds given when only cars are crossing. The city’s practice began in 1973 when Fairfax and Hancock Park area Jewish leaders approached the city with the issue, Fisher said. The program expanded as Jewish leaders heard horror stories of worshippers jaywalking into dangerous traffic or getting slapped with police citations, said Rabbi Alan Kalinsky, West Coast director of the Orthodox Union, an international umbrella organization for synagogues, who had been involved in getting signals in West Los Angeles. In the old days, city crews would have to drive out and manually change the lights. Today, the computer downtown is programmed with the dates, and the signals automatically change. When the first signal was set, crews jokingly altered the street sign from “Walk” and “Don’t Walk” sign to “Valk” and “Don’t Valk” before changing it back. “It happened little by little,” Fisher said. “As new synagogues develop or expand, we get requests.” In 1999, more signals were added in the Valley after the 76-year-old wife of a rabbi was struck and killed while crossing Ventura Boulevard at Newcastle Avenue on her way to weekday morning prayers. One of the newest signals began operating this summer at Goodland Avenue as part of the new Metro Orange Line busway opening later this month. Fisher said the department gets occasional complaints about the seemingly special treatment. But he said it’s no different than what’s done for areas with concentrations of elderly or disabled people. The only expense is the staff time to program the changes. The Orthodox Union’s Rabbi Moshe Krupka compared L.A.’s accommodation to New York’s practice of running extra trains or lifting “No Parking” bans on all sorts of holidays, not just Jewish. However, the signals do slow traffic because drivers who would typically get green lights have to pause on the Sabbath and holidays as the signal cycles to allow pedestrians to cross. The wait’s about 20 seconds longer than usual. Abend said he’s appreciative that such arrangements can be made. “The beauty of America, of Los Angeles, of society is to help each other out,” he said. “I’m sure there’s issues we help other people out. That’s called a community, a government, a society.” Lisa Mascaro, (818) 713-3761 lisa.mascaro@dailynews.com ADDITIONAL AID Crosswalks aren’t the only accommodation made for the Jewish holidays. Jewish leaders cite these additional aids: Elevators: Cars that stop on every floor so the button doesn’t have to be pushed to make a stop. Keys: Locks that use traditional keys rather than electronic key cards on buildings so a card doesn’t have to be swiped to gain entry. Eruv: In the San Fernando Valley, and other areas around the nation, wires are strung across utility poles to symbolically enclose a community. Worshippers who are prohibited from carrying items from private to public spaces during the Sabbath can then carry keys, strollers or other items within what is considered a private area.last_img read more

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