Warriors-Blazers schedule: NBA playoffs 2019

first_imgThe Golden State Warriors will meet the Portland Trail Blazers in the NBA’s Western Conference finals, starting Tuesday.Game time is 6 p.m. Pacific for all games.Game 1: Tuesday, May 14, in OaklandGame 2: Thursday, May 16, in OaklandGame 3: Saturday, May 18, in PortlandGame 4: Monday, May 20, in PortlandGame 5*: Wednesday, May 22, in OaklandGame 6*: Friday, May 24, in PortlandGame 7*: Sunday, May 26, in Oakland*if necessaryIn the Eastern Conference final, the Toronto Raptors will …last_img read more

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Technology Trumps Dogma, And Other Open Source Insights

first_imgMassive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Related Posts Matt Asay 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now IT + Project Management: A Love Affaircenter_img Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Tags:#Marten Mickos#Open Source#strategy A few weeks back I asked Marten Mickos (@martenmickos), CEO of Eucalyptus Systems, to comment on the changing face of open source. He did, and with the usual Mickos style. Unfortunately, a whole lot of great commentary had to be cut for space reasons.Given the brilliant insights Mickos offered, I wanted to share his comments in their entirety here. Mickos helped make MySQL arguably the most popular database on the planet, and is trying to achieve similar success with an open source cloud offering.With a string of successes—and failures—under his belt, Mickos had multiple pearls of open source wisdom to share. For instance while open-source developers have long eschewed corporate influence on open-source projects, Mickos starts by reminds us that money is critical for funding development, not to mention marketing, documentation, etc. The myth of a peace-loving, cashless open source existence is just that: a myth.On the importance of money to open source…Without money, open source will die.On the foundational principle behind open source business strategy…Some people will spend any amount of time to save money. Some will spend money to save time.On the changing face of the open source developer…Back then it seemed that open source developers were true cowboys—out on their own, following their own individual paths, valuing their nearly unlimited freedom. Today, many open source developers are happy to be salaried employees of companies that don’t really stand for open source on a corporate level (Google, HP, IBM, Oracle, etc.). When they make public presentations, they have to state that what they say is their own opinion and not necessarily an official statement of the company they represent. There is a voluntary submissiveness today that wasn’t as common before.On the role of copyleft licensing and governance…The purpose of the FOSS license and the governance model is not really to enable like-minded people to collaborate, although that’s a benefit too. It’s about enabling unlike-minded people to collaborate. The beauty of open source is that people who dislike each other can produce code for the same product.On leadership…Even in a meritocracy, even in peer-production models, people look for leaders.On critical feedback…If you, on a sustaining basis, can truly love harsh feedback and if you can truly show enthusiasm and appreciation for contributions of whatever magnitude and type, you can be wonderfully successful in open source.When people complain about your open source project, you need to hear them as saying “I would love to love you, but right now I cannot.”If nobody is opposed to your open source product/project, you are not really being popular. [This jibes well with my own observations of haters being a leading indicator of success.]On the role of branding…More than a question of licensing, it’s a question of branding. Red Hat took their open source brand “Red Hat” and made it commercial only. Then they established Fedora as the non-commercial brand. MySQL and JBoss did the opposite: they kept one unified brand for both community and commercial use. When you fork, you must use a different name, because branding is not included in the open source licenses.On apparent inconsistencies in open source “theology”…Open source people can be dogmatic, especially about others. They will eagerly demand that some project behave in this or that way for reasons of orthodoxy and purity. But they will at the same time merrily use closed systems such as iBooks because they admire those products. Technology trumps dogma. Coolness is key. All of this I say not as a complaint, but as an observation. To succeed in open source, you must learn to live with it and make the most of it.On changes to open source in the past 10 years…People didn’t know what it was, how it worked, why people did it, how it could produce great software, why it wouldn’t self-die, etc. That’s why the LAMP stack made it onto the front page of Fortune Magazine—it was so new and intriguing. Today people know open source and they know it’s an essential part of the software world.Incumbents fought it. Now they embrace it (or at least pretend to).Those who did open source just did it. There were very few people blogging about the meaning of open source, thinking about the business models, etc. Today you have those who code, those who lead communities, those who test, those who use, those who make money, those who write about it, etc.Licensing was a big issue then, for good reasons. Now it’s much less of a topic.Back then it was relatively few projects with relatively few people in them. Today there are probably 100-1000X the number of projects.Back then the infrastructure didn’t exist. Today we have Wiki, Github, Jira and other services that make it obvious how to run and govern an open source project.Ten years ago people would download distributions. Now they upload images (to the cloud).On what hasn’t changed in open source over the past 10 years…Still a lot of unbridled enthusiasm, often bordering on naïveté—with all the amazing upsides and inevitable downsides that this will bring.Open source still attracts outstanding talent.The most successful open source projects are those that target developers. Products that are supposed to be used by consumers or other non-technical people generally don’t do as well. But there are notable exceptions, as always, such as Firefox, Android and perhaps OpenOffice.last_img read more

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How Social Selling Jumped the Shark

first_imgThere aren’t too many people who believe as deeply as I do in the power of the social tools in business. And yes, salespeople can use these tools to good effect. So this is going to sting a little bit, but here is the truth:Social Selling has jumped the shark.Too much hype. It’s never good to overpromise and under deliver. But that is what social selling has done. It has been offered as the panacea to all the problems that ail sales organizations, and in doing so, the case has been greatly overstated. Wait. It gets worse.The social selling pitch has misled salespeople and sales organization. I am not sure why the social selling proponents have felt that their best argument for using social tools was to suggest that all other methods of prospecting no longer work. The tools have value without making such claims. But too many people have believed this claim, and to their detriment. Honestly, I do know why the proponents of social selling target traditional prospecting methods; that is the primary area where social tools create potential value.Misreading of trends and research. Buyers are on the Internet. Why? Because everyone is on the Internet. The fact that buyers have a LinkedIn profile and a Twitter account provides no more evidence that they want an email or a connection request from a salesperson than a telephone proves they want a phone call. Let’s say I am wrong. Let’s say that buyers are burning up the web getting the evaluation stage of their buying process. That doesn’t change what salespeople need to do to succeed. In fact, it would make those actions more necessary–and more urgent.The words “social selling” don’t match the outcomes salespeople need. The social tools are spectacular for researching your dream clients. For a salesperson with already great prospecting chops, they are incredibly useful. But the social tools only deal with targets above the funnel. They create awareness, brand recognition, and an opportunity to connect. They even allow you to ask for an appointment, should you be so old school. But the tools don’t lend themselves to most of what salespeople do outside of prospecting and nurturing.Proponents sell the idea that to sell you have to not sell. The proponents of social selling suggest that the best way to sell is to not sell at all. Instead, you are supposed to be helpful. This pitch is very appealing to a certain segment of people who carry the title of salesperson without really embracing the role. This idea is causing salespeople and sales organizations to produce results that are less than they should be. It’s too passive. It assumes that inbound opportunities are enough or are somehow more valuable than outbound opportunities. There is nothing about outbound that makes it inherently more self-oriented than inbound.The social curriculum isn’t aligned with real sales outcomes. The curriculum for some of the social selling courses I have seen are mostly built on the proper use of the tools, like setting up a good LinkedIn profile, and writing a good introduction email. They’re built on the idea that “connecting” and “sharing” is the goal. These ideas drive awareness, build your personal brand, and may even allow you to nurture your dream client. These are more marketing than sales. The real goal in any social selling program should be appointment-setting. In fact, I might sign up for a course called: “Appointment-setting using LinkedIn.” Or maybe, “How to Make the Ask Using LinkedIn.”Like social media marketing, anyone with command of the tools is an expert. Try to find a social media marketing expert now. The people with true marketing chops ran away from this title years ago, when every marketing person with a blog and a Twitter account self-identified as an expert. Now they recognize themselves as content marketers or work in digital marketing. Some of the best people in this space never called themselves social media marketers at all, recognizing that the tools were not the deep, underlying force at work but enablers. But a command of the tools doesn’t translate to being able to help produce the main outcome for salespeople, namely acquiring new customers.People with great prospecting chops are great at social too. The salespeople that are good on the phone, good in a room, and good in a face-to-face meeting with a prospect are also good when it comes to using the social tools. They have the requisite confidence. But the folks that lack the confidence in real life, aren’t much better with the social tools. Mostly they hide behind email, afraid to ask for the commitments they really need to create or win an opportunity.The people who benefit the most from social tools and content marketing are entrepreneurs and thought-leaders. Salespeople can’t (or shouldn’t) publish. There is a difference between being a content creator and a curator. Both roles have value, but content is still King (or Queen), and it’s the creator that benefits the most from its sharing. Salespeople need marketing to give them the insights and the tools to share ideas that create value and nurture a relationship. Marketing applies these tools broadly. When salespeople market, it must be done one-to-one, as that it the nature of the relationship.By pretending to be too much, social selling is too little. It could be more. It should be more.The professional proponents of using the social tools understand the value that they create, but they don’t overstate that value. They also readily admit that the social tools do nothing to replace traditional prospecting approaches, but rather, they supplement them.If you are in business-to-business sales, you need to use the social tools. Especially the most useful tool in this regard, LinkedIn. Then you need to go back to doing the work of selling. Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Nowlast_img read more

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WB Governor sends report to Centre

first_imgWest Bengal Governor Keshari Nath Tripathi has sent a report to the Centre on Friday on the ongoing violence in Darjeeling over the demand for a separate Gorkhaland State. “In the report, the Governor said all the stakeholders involved in the Gorkhaland issue should try to resolve the matter through discussion and restore peace in the Darjeeling hills,” sources in the Raj Bhavan told The Hindu.Earlier on Friday, a delegation of three Gorkha Janmukti Morcha (GJM) MLAs — Amar Singh Rai, Rohit Sharma and Sarita Rai — met the Governor and apprised him of the situation in Darjeeling. “The GJM delegation also stated that the State government is yet to issue any formal order stating that Bengali will not be made compulsory in the schools in the hills,” sources in the Raj Bhavan said. ‘Outsiders’ work’Addressing the media after the meeting, Mr. Sharma claimed that “those who are indulging in arson in Darjeeling are not GJM members but outsiders.” He also said the delegation had urged the Governor to “inform the Centre about the situation in Darjeeling and the suffering of the locals due to the State government’s stand over the Gorkhaland issue.”The GJM delegation also accused the State Government of “using force to disrupt the peaceful movement for the separate State.” (With PTI inputs)last_img read more

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