2007 SUMMIT COVERAGE: Businesses must overcome ‘fog’ of pandemic preparedness

first_img See also: Adding to that miasma is the state of US healthcare. In part because of a shortage of workers and the physical limitations of medical centers, the system has little “surge capacity” for the huge influx of patients a pandemic would cause. “We have basically taken [the healthcare] system and sucked it to the bone,” Osterholm said. Maintain flexibility. Osterholm recognized the uncertainty involved in pandemic planning and stressed that plans need malleability so they can adapt to the elusive realities of a pandemic. “Anyone who develops a concrete plan is making a mistake,” he said. “Be capable and be flexible. Another layer of mist comes in the form of making decisions about vaccines and antiviral drugs. Osterholm lauded companies like Roche for increasing production of antiviral drugs like osteltamivir (Tamiflu), but said it remains unclear how effective these drugs will be against H5N1 if it becomes the pandemic strain. How high mortality rates will be Overcome pandemic fatigue. Recognize that some executives may see pandemic planning as no longer important, Osterholm said, calling the phenomenon “pandemic fatigue” and saying, “Acknowledge, accept, and plan around pandemic fatigue.” Osterholm spoke at CIDRAP’s “Business Preparedness for Pandemic Influenza: Second National Summit,” held this week for hundreds of leaders in business, government, and academia. How effective and plentiful antiviral drugs and vaccines will be—and when they’ll be ready Osterholm, director of the University of Minnesota’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), publisher of CIDRAP News, said that several factors cloud the preparedness landscape: Even if companies stockpile antivirals, they face another dilemma: when to use them. If they were to withhold them during a first pandemic wave anticipating a more severe second wave that didn’t happen, people would question the decision, Osterholm said. Likewise, leaders could decide to distribute stockpiled drugs during the first wave, only to discover that the second is more severe. “When do you blow your wad?” he asked. How our communities will mitigate damage “Pre-pandemic” vaccines can be stockpiled in the hope that they may provide some protection against the influenza strain that ultimately causes a pandemic. However, as pointed out by vaccine expert Gregory Poland, MD, in a separate summit presentation Tuesday, a vaccine targeted to the specific pandemic strain would take months to develop and distribute. Feb 7, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Orlando, FL – As businesses develop pandemic preparedness plans, they need to cut through a “fog” of uncertainty about exactly what pandemic influenza will look like and how their companies will be able to respond to it, infectious disease expert Michael Osterholm, PhD, MPH, said at a summit in Orlando Monday. The result, said Osterholm, is that “the availability of protective vaccine during the first wave of a pandemic just won’t be there.” He added, “For most of the world’s population, a vaccine will never be available throughout the duration of a pandemic.” Work around “just in time.” “Don’t try to change the global just-in-time economy,” he said. “That’s like swimming up Niagara Falls. Forget it. You’ve got to work around it.” And with estimates of the mortality rate in a pandemic ranging widely, Osterholm surmised, “We don’t really have a clue” about how many people will succumb. How many waves of the pandemic will occur, and how severe they’ll be Pandemic planning can produce its own haze as planners grapple with issues like ensuring their supply chain or determining government’s role. “We talk about what we might do or can do, but we really don’t know,” Osterholm said. “There are so many uncertainties.” This extends to experts’ estimates of how a pandemic might behave. “We have only a general sense of what the next pandemic influenza strain is capable of doing in terms of human illness or subsequent collateral damage,” he said. Add to that today’s just-in-time economy, in which supplies arrive as they are needed so that companies minimize storage costs. “It is the reality of today’s economy,” Osterholm said. “It’s what MBAs are made of.” That reality, though, means that “even a hiccup” of disruption will mean serious shortages, he predicted. Full text of Feb 2007 HHS report on community mitigation measureshttp://www.pandemicflu.gov/professional/community/community_mitigation.pdf Other steps businesses can take, according to Osterholm, include: “You’re not stuck to a plan,” he said. “You’re stuck to a process.” In addition, said Poland, director of the Mayo Vaccine Research Group in Rochester, Minn., drug companies—even at maximum worldwide production—could deliver only enough vaccine to inoculate 1% to 2% of the world’s population. Shining some light into the pandemic cloud, however, is the recent document on community mitigation measures by the US Department of Health and Human Services (see links below). “You don’t want to have a [pandemic planning] policy inconsistent with this document,” Osterholm said. How our overloaded healthcare systems will cope How our global just-in-time economy will affect access to goods and services He took his “fog of pandemic preparedness” concept from the theory of the “fog of war,” a state of ambiguity soldiers can find themselves in when they doubt their own capabilities and feel unsure of their adversary’s capabilities and intentions. Feb 1 CIDRAP News story: “HHS ties pandemic mitigation advice to severity” Learn from veterans. We need to look at those in the military who have studied the fog of war to explore what to do when unsure about what steps to take.last_img read more

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PREMIUM Urgent response needed as pandemic slows progress on SDGs: Experts

first_imgTopics : Facebook Fiscal stability and greater engagement at the local level are required for countries to stay on track in achieving the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), experts say, as the COVID-19 pandemic appears likely to impede Indonesia’s progress on its 2030 agenda.Economic contraction, deepening poverty and growing unemployment rates related to COVID-19 threaten the country’s achievements, said Amalia A. Widyasanti, head of the National SDG Secretariat under the National Development Planning Agency (Bappenas).Read also: A determined path to the SDGs in 2030 despite COVID-19The government, nongovernment institutions, agencies, the private sector and civil society must be collaborate robustly, she said.“This is a good time to start strengthening stakeholder collaboration so that we can mitigate the risk of the COVID-19 pandemic and, in the … Google Forgot Password ? LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Log in with your social account SDGs COVID-19 pandemic response bappenas ADB Linkedinlast_img read more

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4x100m Penn Relays record by Edwin Allen?

first_imgWhat do you get when you add the fastest Class Three sprinter of all time to a terrific Class One 4×100 metres team?With Edwin Allen High School coach Michael Dyke doing the mathematics, the result could be a new record for the Penn Relays 4×100 metres. Word from the inside is that new Class Three 200m record holder Kevona Davis will join Dyke’s undefeated Class One unit when Edwin Allen lines up at the Penn Relays on April 27.Kashieka Cameron, Patrice Moody and Shellece Clarke have handled the first three legs all season, with team captain Khamoy Farquharson on anchor for two early-season wins. Long jumper and sprinter Tania Campbell took over when Farquharson suffered an injury and closed wins at the Gibson McCook Relays, Boys and Girl Championships’ and the UTech Classic. With Campbell on anchor, these Frankfield flyers have the fastest high school times of the year, 44.56 at Gibson McCook and 44.50 at Champs.Davis could take over the anchor leg at Penn since Carifta Under-20 Trials winner Cameron, 2016 Girls’ Champs 100 winner Moody and Clarke, a 100m champion in Classes Two, Three and Four, are settled in their established roles.Davis brings times of 11.43 seconds for the 100 and 23.07 seconds for the 200 – the new Champs Class Three record – to the task. Together, the Cameron-Moody-Clarke-Davis line-up has more than enough speed to reach the 2004 Vere Technical High School record of 44.32 seconds.GOOD WEATHERIf the tall 15-year-old Davis acquits herself well and if the weather is as good as it was when Vere set the existing mark, the record is within reach. According to www.bbc.com/weather, the conditions’ could favour fast running. On Thursday, when the girls competition begins at Penn, the prediction is for sun with a high temperature of 24 degrees Celsius. On Friday, when the finals are run, the forecast is for a high of 26 degrees Celsius and partly cloudy skies.There are other teams in the hunt. Holmwood Technical and Hydel High became the second and third teams to break 45 flat in Class Two at Champs and both schools could bolster their line-up.last_img read more

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Donegal Death Notices – Rest in Peace

first_imgDonegal death notices for today, Sunday, December 3. Annie O’DONNELL (née Duffy)The death has occurred of Annie O’Donnell (née Duffy), Curraghamone, Ballybofey, Donegal, peacefully, in her 93rd year, surrounded by her loving family. Beloved wife of the late Domnic, and much loved mother of Nan, Kathleen, Margaret, Brigid, Bernie, Marjorie, Dommie, Seamus, Michael and the late John, cherished sister of Brigid, Michael, Mary, Peadar, Charlie, Anjo, also the late James, Johnny, Patsy, Dolly, Eugene and Hugh. Sadly missed by her sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, grandchildren, nephews, nieces, extended family circle, neighbours and many friends. Remains reposing at the home of her daughter, Bernie O’Donnell, Curraghamone, on Sunday Dec. 3rd from 4pm. Funeral leaving her home on Tuesday Dec 5th at 10.20am for Requiem Mass in the Church of Mary Immaculate, Stranorlar, at 11am. Interment afterwards in Stranorlar Cemetery. John GIBBONSThe death has occurred of John Gibbons, Greenfort, Portsalon, Donegal.Reposing at his late residence. Removal today, Sunday, at 12.30pm to St. Columba’s Church, Massmount for Requiem Mass at 1pm with burial afterwards in the adjoining cemetery.  Rose CARLIN (née Quinn)The peaceful death has occurred of Rose Carlin, Gortiness, Cloghan, in the loving care of her family. Much loved mother of Nora, Mary, Peter and Anthony. Sadly missed by her entire family, grandchildren, relatives and large circle of friends.Reposing at her daughter’s residence, Nora Carlin, Lettershambo, Cloghan, from 12 noon today, Sunday 3rd of December, until removal on Monday at 12.15pm to Our Lady of Perpetual Succour, Glenfin, for Funeral Mass at 1pm. Burial afterwards in Kilteevogue Cemetery, Glenfin. One-way traffic diversion in placeDonegal Death Notices – Rest in Peace was last modified: December 3rd, 2017 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:obituarieslast_img read more

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