DIPLOMAT-REPORT 2 LAST

first_imgThe report also mentions that the diplomats daughter was The report also mentions that the diplomats daughter was the only person whom the Nepalese women knew by name. In their complaint, the victims told the police that the father of the girl allegedly used to rape, sodomise and assault them with his “friends” and the mother of the girl often used to threaten them by putting knife on their throats. Once she had also allegedly “stabbed” one of the victims on her arm. However, the diplomats daughter had never assaulted them. Gurgaon Police had received a letter – followed by a phone call – from the Nepal embassy asking the Commissioner to “rescue and repatriate” the Nepalese women. A copy of the letter was also purportedly sent to the MEA, the report reads. Also, Gurgaon Police now have in its possession, 18-days video footage extracted from a DVR connected to CCTV cameras installed outside the diplomats apartment. The footage disclose several frequent visitors but the victims are needed to identify them, said a senior official, adding that the police needs the MEAs approval to approach the victims. PTI DEY SHSlast_img read more

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Encapsulating biomedical micromotors in traditional pill form

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 5 2018Using tiny micromotors to diagnose and treat disease in the human body could soon be a reality. But keeping these devices intact as they travel through the body remains a hurdle. Now in a study appearing in ACS Nano, scientists report that they have found a way to encapsulate micromotors into pills. The pill’s coating protects the devices as they traverse the digestive system prior to releasing their drug cargo.About the width of a human hair, micromotors are self-propelled microscopic robots designed to perform a host of biomedical tasks. In previous research, Joseph Wang, Liangfang Zhang and colleagues used micromotors coated with an antibiotic to treat ulcers in laboratory mice. They found that this approach produced better results than just taking the drugs by themselves. However, the researchers noted that body fluids, such as gastric acid and intestinal fluids, can compromise the effectiveness of micromotors and trigger early release of their payloads. In addition, when taken orally in fluid, some of the micromotors can get trapped in the esophagus. To overcome these issues, Wang and Zhang sought to develop a way to protect and carry these devices into the stomach without compromising their mobility or effectiveness.The researchers created a pill composed of a pair of sugars — lactose and maltose — that encapsulated tens of thousands of micromotors made of a magnesium/titanium dioxide core loaded with a fluorescent dye cargo. These sugars were chosen because they are easy to mold into tablet, can disintegrate when needed and are nontoxic. When given to laboratory mice, these pills improved the release and retention of the micromotors in the stomach compared to those encapsulated in silica-based tablets or in a liquid solution. The researchers concluded that encapsulating micromotors in traditional pill form improves their ability to deliver medicines to specific targets without diminishing their mobility or performance.Source: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/presspacs/2018/acs-presspac-september-5-2018/a-pill-for-delivering-biomedical-micromotors.htmllast_img read more

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