New lab helps faculty reduce stress

first_imgWorking at a top-tier research university can be a stressful job, but now faculty and staff members at USC have a chance to relieve that stress by visiting the Stress Reduction Lab at the USC Center for Work and Family Life.The Center for Work and Family Life strives to help faculty and staff members successfully balance their work and personal lives, and the Stress Reduction Lab is their newest method of helping to create that balance.The Stress Reduction Lab features a program called emWave, which uses a type of biofeedback technology that measures heart rate through a finger or ear clip sensor plugged into a computer. That heart rate measurement gives a sense of how relaxed or stressed a person is.“It gives feedback on how your body is doing; the real value of it is that you learn specific techniques from what feedback tells you,” said Jason Sackett, employee assistance professional at the Center for Work and Family Life. “It trains you to learn how to better use stress reduction techniques.”The program itself does not reduce stress but rather gives the user feedback — based on their heart rate — on how to have more effective stress reduction techniques.A member of the center’s staff tracks the participant’s heart rate through various stress reduction activities, such as deep breathing or meditation, and helps the participant determine which method is most effective.First-time participants can go to the Stress Reduction Lab for introductory sessions, where an employee will provide tutorials to help the participant get comfortable with the program and find effective stress reduction techniques. After that, users can guide themselves through the program if they feel they have mastered the technique.Sackett said the program can be used both as a stress reliever and as a preventative measure.“One of the values of the program is that you don’t have to have stress to benefit, and it can actually be used to prevent stress from oncoming in the first place,” Sackett said.The idea of a Stress Reduction Lab arose during the summer, when the center initially started working with emWave, Sackett said. The center wanted to develop a proactive program available to anyone looking to improve their stress reduction strategies.“We wanted to offer something that is more universally accepted,” Sackett said. “People have resistance to going to counseling programs, so we wanted to offer another program in which people don’t have to deal with the resistance.”The center officially launched the emWave program in November and began advertising it to faculty and staff members this month.So far, Sackett said he has helped an average of six people a week and other members of the centers staff have also helped staff members.Some faculty members, though they have not tried the program yet, said it was something they might do.“I’ve never tried it but it sounds like something I would consider,” said Felipe Martinez, assistant director of Norman Topping Student Aid Fund. “It’s important to be able to achieve work/life balance, so something that will help manage stress is very beneficial.”Chris Mattson, director of the Structured Curriculum Program, said he thinks using the emWave could be beneficial.“It seems interesting — anything to help relieve stress is a good thing, especially when it doesn’t cause more stress,” Mattson said.USC currently operates two emWave programs at the USC University Park Campus, one at the USC Health Sciences Campus and one portable emWave. Sackett said that if the program seems to show improvement among the users — and it has so far — the Center will purchase more emWave programs.“We had the idea to expand wellness services at USC, and we saw this as just another way to preserve wellness,” Sackett said.last_img read more

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Hey, national news types, Wellington’s cat law isn’t that uncommon!

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — Wellington, Kansas has been getting a lot of national exposure concerning its new law limiting the number of cats per household. But Wellington city officials are puzzled as to why.The new city law enacted on Dec. 18, which limits the number of cats to four per owner is not unusual, said Tracy Heath, Wellington City Police Chief. Actually, it is quite commonplace.“I know Ark City does, and there are several other communities who have cat regulations,” Heath said. “In fact when we started the process a year and a half ago I did some research around the state. And there are several communities that limit the number of animals per household.“In fact, there are other communities that have had a similar law for years. And I’d venture to say there are cities in other states that have a similar ordinance.”So why was Wellington singled out making it a national news story?“I haven’t a clue,” Heath said.Perhaps, the answer may be timing, and how news disseminates these days.Earlier this week, a news report on ABC News had listed Wellington’s cat limitation law as one of the many “oddball” laws being enacted for 2013. It was attributed to a story on the Wellington Daily News website. Since that broadcast on the morning show Good Morning America on Dec. 31, the story has been repeated throughout the national cable and internet circuit.People have reported to Sumner Newscow that the story was on NBC’s Today Show, the Sean Hannity show on Fox News, The Five on Fox News — not to mention a plethora of national news and gossip websites out there.Shane Farley, owner of Newscow.net in Winfield, said national cable news networks are like news outlets on the local level. There are slow news days. And typically when it comes to news, the week between Christmas and New Years is usually the slowest news week of the year.The new cat stipulation was part of an overall sweeping change to Wellington’s pet ordinance which also included creating an animal control officer, penalizing repeated animal abusers and an exotic pet stipulation (see story here).As far as the cat stipulation, Heath said it isn’t like law enforcement is going to make it a top priority and look for more homes where there are more than four felines. It gives the city a specific law to use in case there are complaints from neighbors about a house with an exorbitant number of cats.Heath reported that through November 2012, the city has picked up 231 cats and has euthanized 201 of those cats for the year. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (7) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down Cats galore · 396 weeks ago I’m surprised Farley didn’t comment on what it’s like owning a plethora of cats. I hear he has quite a houseful. Report Reply 0 replies · active 396 weeks ago +2 Vote up Vote down Sonny · 396 weeks ago I think it’s a good law. The cats are running all over the place. The dog has to been controlled so what is so damn wrong with the cat lovers that don’t want to comply, cost ya money. Join the others for tags and shots. I had a trap to get some around my place. I couldn’t let my 2 dogs out with out going out myself looking for cats in or around the yard. They barked and run up and down the fence trying to get at the cats. Maybe I could have just turned them loose but I love animals too. So control you cats. Report Reply 0 replies · active 396 weeks ago +2 Vote up Vote down Jim · 396 weeks ago Sonny I have the feeling you need to get your eyes checked as it was probably a squirrel running on the fence. Maybe we should have an ordinance for having too many of them in your yard and feeding them. I sure see alot of them squashed on the roads every year. Report Reply 0 replies · active 396 weeks ago +2 Vote up Vote down Sonny · 396 weeks ago Oh Jim you are so funny. You don’t know the difference between cats and squirrels. Don’t be a smart ass. Report Reply 0 replies · active 396 weeks ago +3 Vote up Vote down hah! · 396 weeks ago So everybody with more than 4 cats, you’d better be nice to your neighbors! Report Reply 0 replies · active 396 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down birdfan · 396 weeks ago If it’s a small town in Kansas, it’s quaint or quirky. If it’s a big town in Ca that passes the same law well that’s just common sense to the national media. Report Reply 0 replies · active 396 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down michael · 396 weeks ago just gives them a chance to mess with who they want when they want welcome to wellington Report Reply 0 replies · active 396 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

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Spinalators win 2016 Great Race over the Enchies in photo finish

first_imgSpinalators take the crown after a photo finish.by James Jordan, Sumner Newscow — The Great Race lived up to its name Saturday at Woods Park in Wellington, with a photo finish and three teams within 10 seconds after the 13 events were completed.  After deliberating for awhile, looking at videos and photographs taken by area media and people at the event, race officials declared The Anders Spinalators the winners, and the Dore Enchies were second. SSB Bank Big Bucks were third, 10 seconds behind.The race was close throughout with those three teams close. The final leg is a 360 yard sprint in a straight line. At the start of that leg the Dore Enchies were about 100 feet or more behind. Sam McDaniel was in the lead but Vince DeGrado made up time fast down the stretch for the Dore Enchies. McDaniel managed to hold off DeGrado even though DeGrado used a “hook” move, trying to push McDaniel aside as they crossed the finish line together.Tammy Mansfield of Wellington rides a horse for Team Dad Bod.The two men fell to the ground, not knowing who had one. They congratulated each other, and waited for the results.The top three teams were neck and neck, providing for the closest finish in years.The Enchies and the Spinalators were within shouting distance of each other throughout the race.McDaniel said they were “both just in the moment at the finish line. That is just a part of racing.”Both of them ran for Southwestern College in Winfield. DeGrado graduated in 2004 and was an All American. McDaniel graduated in 2009. That made it a little more fun for McDaniel.DeGrado is a track coach, and he said he thought about how he yells at his runners as they approach the finish line.“Now I was on the other side of that. I just tried to man up and go,” DeGrado said.“I gave it my all. I tried that little hook move. I thought I might have caught him. It was a lot of fun and good competition,” he said.Race organizer Jack Potucek said it was the second closest race of the 25 that had been held previously. There was one once that had three teams finish within seven seconds, which had been the closest.He said according to the rules of track, it is the body crossing the finish line that counts most. Photos showed their feet at about a dead heat at the end.John Anders, captain of the Spinalators, being interviewed by race organizer Jack Potucket after big team win.Spinalator captain John Anders ran the bicycle portion of the race, and his team was in first at that time, but not by much.Enchies’ captain Kip Etter said it is a great event, He did not get to see the ending, but said it was a judgment call.“It was a great race. We appreciate all the people that put in the effort for this event,” he said.This makes two in a row for the Spinalators, who won last year but not in this dramatic way. Security State Bank was second last year and the Enchies were third after having some problems in the motorcross and coming back.Nine teams participated in the Great Race this year.Dane Leak, representing the Enchies, picks up the spike and heads to his bike.Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (3) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down Oh boy · 210 weeks ago It was a photo finish but you don’t have the photo of the finish?!? Report Reply 0 replies · active 210 weeks ago +2 Vote up Vote down WHS · 210 weeks ago The picture where it says Bryan Dennett is actually Dane Leak from WHS class of 2011! Report Reply 0 replies · active 210 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down Tammy Mansfield · 210 weeks ago This year’s race was great. That is also a great picture of myself and my horse Trixie. We are looking forward to next year’s race. Report Reply 0 replies · active 210 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

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City of Tumwater : NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

first_imgThe Tumwater City Council will hold two public hearings at 7:00pm on Tuesday, July 19, 2011, in the Council Chambers at Tumwater City Hall, 555 Israel Road SW, Tumwater, Washington: NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING July 18, 2011 For the purpose of considering adoption of Resolution No. R2011-011, in support of the City of Tumwater, Washington, Proposition 1, Fire and Public Safety Levy Lid Lift that will appear before the voters on the August 16, 2011, Primary Election Ballot.The public is invited to attend this public hearing to give comments in favor of or in opposition to the adoption of Resolution No. R2011-011.For further information, please contact John Doan, City Administrator, at (360) 754-4120.And for the purpose of considering adoption of Resolution No. R2011-012, in support of Fire Protection District 15 Thurston County, Washington, Proposition 1, Fire Protection Services and Facilities Levy Lid Lift that will appear before the voters on the August 16, 2011, Primary Election Ballot.The public is invited to attend this public hearing to give comments in favor of or in opposition to the adoption of Resolution No. R2011-012.For further information, please contact John Carpenter, Fire Chief, at (360) 754-4170.center_img Facebook0Tweet0Pin0 CITY  OF  TUMWATERMelody Valiant, City Clerklast_img read more

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Mayors Cast Wishes For 2016

first_imgBy John BurtonAs we look ahead to 2016, we take stock on our lives and often make those resolutions to better ourselves. We say we’re going to lose weight, quit smoking, exercise more and take other steps to improve our lot in life. Mayors also have to take into consideration the future of their communities they govern. And many of the Two River area’s mayors offered their hopes for this year.MONMOUTH BEACH – “No snowstorms and no hurricanes!” was Mayor Susan Howard’s wish for the year, as the shore community moves toward completing its recovery from 2012’s Super Storm Sandy. “And everybody will be home,” able to return to the renovated, rebuilt and often elevated homes, she continued.The municipality is in the process of elevating and repairing its Sandy-damaged public library. And when that work is completed, officials will begin work on raising and additional repairs to borough hall. Howard said that work is on track to be finished this year. With that, “Monmouth Beach will have completed its recovery from Sandy,” she said.HIGHLANDS – Mayor Frank Nolan’s resolution is not so dissimilar to those expressed by Howard, as Nolan looks ahead to his Sandy-ravished town. “We hope to have everyone back in their homes who aren’t there yet,” Nolan wished for the coming year. He said there remains “a few dozen families who are not done, done,” completing the rebuilding so they can again live in their homes. About 1,000 homes were damaged or destroyed by the storm.This is Nolan’s last year of his current term. “I don’t know if I’m going to go again,” he said, regarding running for another term, given he’d like to spend some additional time with his kids. But until he makes that final call, “Obviously, I want to finish we started,” in terms of the rebuilding efforts.In 2015 “We turned the corner” moving beyond victim and rebuilding, he said. Now there is progressive development, with projects in the works that will mean completely recovering the $200 million in ratables the community lost to Sandy damage.“So in the end, it’s tough to swallow now, but we’re going to be better off than we were before the storm,” He maintained. “It’s just a shame it took that devastation to get us there.”One lesson that came out of Sandy and from his last election campaign, which he said he will continue to use, is aggressive communication with the public, “letting everyone know what’s going on.” Nolan uses Facebook to keep the community informed, which complements two other Facebook pages on Highlands goings-on. “People really have a chance to learn about the issues in the town,” he said.RUMSON – Mayor John Ekdahl acknowledged that some of 2015’s steps forward couldn’t be predicted if asked about them a year ago. The establishment of the bike lanes wasn’t on the agenda last January; nor were the repairs and repaving of county thoroughfares Rumson and Ridge roads that allowed for the new bike lanes. “They weren’t planned,” not on the local level, he said. “They just sort of evolved, if you will.”“Looking ahead,” he explained, “we have a couple of planned projects,” and in a sense they are Sandy-related.Rumson has had some additional savings in its sanitary water treatment costs. And with that money “we’re going to make a long-term commitment” and address infiltration of its sewer lines over a three-year period. The system has rain and river water infiltrating the system. And that means that extra water is taken into account in the treatment cost at the regional treatment center. “Which is very expensive,” he said.The borough’s Department of Public Works facility, behind the municipal complex, 80 East River Road, and much of its accompanying equipment, were damaged by Sandy. Plans now call to have flood doors installed on the facility. In addition, the below-ground gasoline tanks, which had taken a hit from the storm, will be reinstalled above ground.“They’re not sexy or exciting projects,” Ekdahl acknowledged, “but they will save money over time.”ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS – Mayor Rhonda “Randi” Le Grice, on her first day in office said there are two secrets in keeping resolutions: “One is setting goals that are realistic and the second is having the support of other people.” And her resolutions involve focusing on “what we can achieve together and not what we can’t.”To that end Le Grice said she’ll concentrate on revitalizing the borough’s First Avenue business district. She plans on working with the local Chamber of Commerce and commercial property owners to have a strategy to welcome businesses and fill vacant storefronts.“I feel we can do a better job marketing the Atlantic Highlands we all love,” she said on Jan. 1, “not only as a great place to visit, but also to work in, to shop in, and to live in and raise a family.”The incoming mayor also plans to ensure the community is better informed about events and issues. She plans on having the website revamped to make it more accessible.But Le Grice acknowledged the mayor can only do so much and called upon community members to get more involved, volunteer and serve.Those would be some ways “to turn resolutions into results,” she said.SHREWSBURY – “I think it’s going to be a positive year,” predicted Mayor Donald Burden. But he hopes county officials are able to correct the ongoing property tax assessment morass that has preoccupied local and county officials for months and apparently is the subject of a county prosecutor investigation.In the coming months the local planning board and zoning board of adjustment will have substantial applications before them for proposed senior housing and retail projects. “We want to get these businesses integrated into the community, if approved,” Burden said, “making sure we’re not putting too much pressure on our First Aid and fire departments.”The council and department heads will be drafting the municipal budget in the near future. “I can’t predict what we’re going to do in terms of taxes yet,” he acknowledged. But, he added, “I think it’ll be pretty low.”FAIR HAVEN – Mayor Ben Lucarelli had a pretty simple wish moving forward: “Let’s hope it’s a nice, calm, peaceful year,” he hoped.There are things in the works that Lucarelli said he wasn’t at liberty to discuss just yet. But plans are in the works to move forward on the planned passive park overlooking the Navesink River on DeNormandie Avenue, providing a “clean, well-lit place for residents to use,” providing another recreational opportunity, he said.Last year, the council drafted a budget that did not include a tax increase.Lucarelli hopes to be able to do it again or pretty close to it, “keeping the budget flat as we can and to maintain what it is we have,” he said.HOLMDEL – Mayor Eric Hinds said “I’m excited for the future.” And that future for Holmdel will include continuing the town’s five-year plan for road improvements, infrastructure upgrades and other community projects.Last year the town spent $2.6 million for various projects. “We’ll probably spend a similar amount this year and next few,” on the projects, he said.“We have aggressive goals,” he offered. And those goals include renovating the public library and investigating the construction of a recreation center for local youth.“We want to make sure we’re a premier spot for families,” he said.MIDDLETOWN ­– “The snowless winter we’ve had so far, we’re off to a good start for the year,” saving money on employee overtime and road treatment, said Township Committeeman Gerard Scharfenberger, selected to serve as this year’s mayor.The five-member township committee will undertake an aggressive plan to generate economic development. “Every time you see a half-empty strip mall or an empty office building, that’s a big drain on the town,” he acknowledged.The committee will be reviewing ordinances “to see what can be done to make us more business friendly,” he saidThere are a number of shared service agreements in the works with county government and the board of education that will curb costs and generate some revenue, offering some relief to taxpayers, he said.As mayor, Scharfenberger will initiate a Mayor’s Wellness Campaign that could help in employee health care costs and help employees’ health. In addition, he’ll reach out to community groups to keep them informed.“Anybody who has any interest,” he said. “That gives me a chance to educate them on how the system works.”LITTLE SILVER – Mayor Robert Neff Jr., last year saw his town change a long-standing tradition of no liquor licenses and embrace that change. Now he and the borough council members will undertake drafting the ordinance that will lay out the provisions and regulations for a future restaurant and bar. “We changed our minds last year,” Neff observed at the Little Silver reorganization meeting, offering his annual prepared rhyming couplets. “We changed our minds last year by vote, a license is to be / A family style watering hole? Or gourmet fare? We’ll see…”This year plans call for paving Prospect Avenue and new sidewalks for Church Street. And the borough received a county Open Space grant for to renovate the borough’s sports field.The borough will have a new communications tower built this year—improving cellphone receptions and emergency communications in the community. And the historic Parker Homestead will have work done on its dilapidated barns.last_img read more

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