The press in South Africa

first_imgThere are 23 daily and 14 weekly major urban newspapers in South Africa, most published in English. There are also a number of regional and community newspapers, most delivered free of charge, as well as a range of general and specialised news websites.Some 12.4-million South Africans buy the urban dailies, while community newspapers have a circulation of 5.5-million.Sections in this article:Trends in South African newspapers South Africa’s daily newspapersSouth Africa’s weekly newspapersSouth Africa’s news websitesRelated articlesUseful links Trends in South African newspapers South Africa has always had a courageous and opinionated press. For over 40 years the apartheid state tried to gag the country’s newspapers, using legislation, harassment and imprisonment, culminating in the late-1980s States of Emergency. Through all of this, South Africa’s press continued to report on all the news they could.With democracy in 1994, South Africa’s newspapers were freed from all restrictions. The country’s Constitution, adopted in 1996, explicitly protects the freedom of the press in its Bill of Rights. Section 16 states:Everyone has the right to freedom of expression, which includes – freedom of the press and other media; freedom to receive or impart information or ideas; freedom of artistic creativity; and academic freedom and freedom of scientific researchThe right in subsection (1) does not extend to- propaganda for war; incitement of imminent violence; oradvocacy of hatred that is based on race, ethnicity, gender or religion, and that constitutes incitement to cause harm. Reporters Without Borders ranks South Africa at 38 in its 2010 Press Freedom Index. This puts the country ahead of France (44), Italy (49), and the US (99).The development of the South African press since the end of apartheid has shown two significant trends: the stagnation and decline of the traditional mainstream newspapers, and the phenomenal growth of papers with a black, working class readership.The stagnation of South Africa’s mainstream press, which traditionally had a wealthy white readership, mirrors the trend in established newspapers in developed countries across the world. This stagnation is generally attributed to the growth of the internet since the dotcom crash of 2001, with more and more of those who can choosing to find their news online instead of on the printed page.On the other hand the opposite trend, the remarkable growth of newspaper readership in the lower end of the market, is a phenomenon seen in developing countries such as India and China. This is due to the vast improvement in the living standards in South Africa’s poorest communities, the major beneficiaries of change in this country. Their living conditions and general standard of living changed almost overnight as access to housing, electricity, running water, job opportunities and minimum wages came sweeping through under a new democratic government.In this vast new readership one paper stands out: Daily Sun. Launched in 2002 to fill the enormous gap in the newspaper market, this tabloid has seen its circulation rise from 78 000 in its first year to 513 291 in the first quarter of 2009 – and that is just copies sold. Its readership has increased from under half a million to 5-million for the period between January and December 2010 (South African Advertising Research Foundation).Daily Sun’s success has led to an increasing “tabloidisation” of South Africa’s newspaper industry, with a number of new tabloids being launched. These include the Afrikaans-language Son and English-language Daily Voice, both targeting working class coloured and, to a lesser extent, white readers in the Western Cape.Back to the top South Africa’s daily newspapers Note: Circulation: Number of copies sold. Data sourced from the Audit Bureau of Circulations South Africa (ABC) circulation figures for October to December 2010. Readers: Number of people who read the newspaper. Data sourced from the South African Advertising Research Foundation‘s All Media Products Survey (Amps) Average Issue Readership of Newspapers and Magazines, January 2010 to December 2010. Beeld Beeld is an Afrikaans-language daily, printed six days a week and distributed in Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Northern Province and KwaZulu-Natal. First published in 1974, the paper is owned by Media24.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Media24 Editor: Tim du PlessisLanguage: AfrikaansCirculation: 85 004Readers: 506 000Circulation – Weekend Beeld: 83 800Readers – Weekend Beeld: 114 000Die Burger Afrikaans-language daily Die Burger, first published in 1915, is the biggest daily newspaper in the Western Cape, with separate editions for the Eastern and Western Cape. The paper is owned by Media24.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Media24 Editor: Bun BooyensLanguage: AfrikaansCirculation: 69 956Readers: 490 000Circulation – Saturday Burger: 77 800Readers – Saturday Burger: 194 000Business Day As its name suggests, Business Day is a dedicated business newspaper, reporting on corporate news, black economic empowerment, economic policy, corporate governance and financial markets. It is owned by BDFM Publishers, a division of Avusa, and Avusa’s partner, London-based Pearson Plc.Website TwitterOwned by: AvusaEditor: Peter BruceLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 36 110Readers: 76 000Business Report Launched in 1995, Business Report is South Africa’s second financial daily, edited in Johannesburg but printed in three cities. It is inserted in all Independent Newspapers’ morning titles in Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban and Pretoria.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Jabulani SikhakhaneLanguage: EnglishCape Argus Independent Newspapers’ Cape Argus is an afternoon daily aimed at middle- to upper-income readers in Cape Town. Its readership consists of all races.Website TwitterOwned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Chris WhitfieldLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 63 200Readers: 349 000Circulation – Saturday Argus: 48 050Readers – Saturday Argus: 213 000Circulation – Sunday Argus: 27 980Readers – Sunday Argus: 145 000Cape Times Independent Newspapers’ Cape Times, a daily published since 1876, aims at the middle classes of Cape Town. It has a mainly white and coloured readership.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor:  Alide DasnoisLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 42 710Readers: 268 000The Citizen The Citizen is published six days a week and distributed mainly in Gauteng. The newspaper is owned by CTP/Caxton.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Caxton Acting editor: Martin WilliamsLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 69 036Readers: 370 000Circulation – Saturday Citizen: 44 080Readers – Saturday Citizen: 181 000Daily Dispatch The first issue of the East London Daily Dispatch was published in 1898. The newspaper is the Eastern Cape’s biggest selling daily, with a Xhosa and English supplement published on Wednesdays. The Dispatch was edited by Donald Woods from 1965 until his arrest and banning in 1977 for exposing government responsibility for the death of Steve Biko. It is owned by Avusa.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Avusa Editor: Mpumelelo Mkhabela  Language: EnglishCirculation: 27 200Readers: 269 000Circulation – Saturday Dispatch: 22 240Readers – Saturday Dispatch: 148 000Daily News Independent Newspapers’ Daily News, first published in 1878 as the Natal Mercantile Advertiser, is targeted at the middle market of Durban and the rest of KwaZulu-Natal.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Allen DunnLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 37 110Readers: 430 000Daily Sun Daily Sun is by far and away the largest newspaper in South Africa, and the first aimed at the black working class. A tabloid initially met with disdain by the established press, its huge sales – and the fact that it has made new newspaper readers out of millions of South Africans – have earned it respect. It offers more local news and gossip, focusing on events in ordinary people’s lives rather than national and international news.Website Owned by: Media24 Editor: Themba KhumaloLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 414 280Readers: 5 023 000Daily Voice The Daily Voice, an Independent Nespapers publication, is a tabloid aimed mainly at blue-collar workers of the Cape Flats. With its pay-off line “sex, scandal, skinder (gossip) and sport” the newspaper is unashamedly a South African take on UK tabloids such as the Sun. It is published in English – with plenty of Afrikaans slang thrown in – and was launched to compete with Son, Media24’s successful Afrikaans-language tabloid.Website: noneOwned by: Independent Newspaper Group Acting editor: Elliot SylvesterExecutive editor: Karl BrophyLanguage: EnglishReaders: 585 000Diamond Fields Advertiser Established in 1878, Independent Newspapers’ Diamond Fields Advertiser is based in Kimberley and targets the communities of the sparsely populated Northern Cape.Website: noneFacebookOwned by: Independent Newspaper Group Managing editor: Johan du PlessisLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 9 750Readers: 70 000The Herald Founded in 1845 as the Eastern Province Herald, the Herald is one of South Africa’s oldest newspapers. Its first edition – four pages – came out on 7 May 1845 and cost one penny. The Herald is owned by Avusa and distributed in the Eastern Cape, with its main base in Port Elizabeth.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Avusa Editor: Heather RobertsonLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 22 390Readers: 256 000Isolezwe Isolezwe is the premier isiZulu newspaper, published Mondays to Fridays. The paper has also launched the first Zulu-language website in the world. It is owned by Independent Newspapers.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Mazwi XabaLanguage: isiZuluCirculation: 100 790Readers: 696 000The MercuryThe Mercury, published since 1852, is Durban’s morning newspaper. It is owned by Independent Newspapers. Its readership is 47% white, 18% black and the rest coloured and Indian.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Angela QuintalLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 33 330Readers: 275 000New AgeLaunched in December 2010, the New Age is a daily national newspaper published by TNA Media. The online version launched earlier, in September of the same year. The New Age is pro-government, but is said to have no formal ties with any political party. It’s also claimed to be “constructively critical”, according to former Minister in the Presidency Essop Pahad.WebsiteOwned by: TNA MediaEditor: Henry JeffreysLanguage: EnglishPretoria News Pretoria News, first published in 1898, is Independent Newspapers’ daily in the capital city. Mainly sold in Gauteng, it is also distributed in Mpumalanga and North West. Some 65% of its readers are black and 33% white.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Zingisa MkhumaLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 24 820Readers: 105 000Circulation – Weekend Pretoria News: 14 710Readers – Weekend Pretoria News: 37 000Son The world’s first Afrikaans tabloid, Son emulates British papers such as the Sun, focusing on scandal, gossip, entertainment and sport – and page three girls. The paper appears in four regional editions: Western Cape, Eastern Cape, Northern Cape and the central South African region. In the Western Cape province, it appears as a daily; in other provinces, it is a weekly paper. Son is owned by Media24.Website Owned by: Media24 Editor in Chief: Andrew KoopmanLanguage: AfrikaansCirculation: 115 100Readers: 1 039 000Circulation – Weekend Kaapse Son: 65 080Readers – Weekend Kaapse Son: 390 000Sowetan Sowetan is Daily Sun’s main competition, also aimed at an English-literate black readership. Initially distributed as a weekly free sheet in Soweto, the paper was transformed into a daily in 1981 to fill the void left by the Post, which was deregistered by the apartheid government. Sowetan is owned by Avusa.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Avusa Editor in Chief: Bongani KeswaLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 125 490Readers: 1 522 000The Star The Star is published in Johannesburg and distributed throughout South Africa, with most sales in Gauteng. Once aimed exclusively at the white market, today over 50% of the Star’s readers are black. It is owned by Independent Newspapers. Launched in Grahamstown in the Eastern Cape in 1887 as the Eastern Star, the paper moved to Johannesburg in 1889.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Moegsien WilliamsLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 143 080Readers: 574 000Circulation – Saturday Star: 105 030Readers – Saturday Star: 291 000The Times The Times was launched in 2007. The sister paper to the Sunday Times, it has a unique and experimental form of circulation: it is not available for sale, but rather is distributed free of charge to the Sunday Times’s 127 000 subscribers, from Monday to Friday. In tabloid format, it carries news that can be read in 20 minutes. It ties heavily into the Times website, providing additional content such as blogs, podcasts and video online.Website FacebookOwned by: Avusa Editor: Phylicia OppeltLanguage: EnglishReaders: 331 000Volksblad First published in 1904, Volksblad is the oldest Afrikaans daily in the country and the largest in the Free State and Northern Cape. It is owned by Media24.Website Owned by: Media24 Editor: Ainsley MoosLanguage: AfrikaansCirculation: 22 110Readers: 162 000Circulation – Saturday Volksblad: 19 070Readers – Saturday Volksblad: 62 000The Witness South Africa’s oldest newspaper, the Witness, serves English readers throughout KwaZulu-Natal, with most of its readers in greater Pietermaritzburg and inland KwaZulu-Natal. Owned by Media24, it was formerly known as the Natal Witness.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Media24 Editor:  Fikile-Ntsikelelo MoyaLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 19 750Readers: 152 000Circulation – Saturday Witness: 22 250Readers – Saturday Witness: 171 000Back to the topSouth Africa’s weekly newspapers Note: Circulation: Number of copies sold. Data sourced from the Audit Bureau of Circulations South Africa (ABC) circulation figures for October to December 2010. Readers: Number of people who read the newspaper. Data sourced from the South African Advertising Research Foundation‘s All Media Products Survey (Amps) Average Issue Readership of Newspapers and Magazines, January 2010 to December 2010. City Press First published in 1982 as Golden City Press, City Press is aimed at the black market. Its name was changed in 1983 by its owners, Jim Bailey and the South African Associated Newspapers. Media24 acquired the paper in 1984. It is published on Sundays.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Media24 Editor: Ferial HaffajeeLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 152 910Readers: 1 867 000Independent on Saturday The Independent on Saturday caters for the KwaZulu-Natal market. It is published by Independent Newspapers. Its readership is 47% Indian, 33% white and 15% black.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Clyde BawdenLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 48 160Readers: 280 000Isolezwe nge SontoLaunched on 30 March 2008, the newspaper is the Sunday edition of the daily distributed Isolezwe.  Its first ABC quarter figures proved it to be very popular in Durban.  It is a tabloid targeted at the Zulu-speaking middle class market in Kwazulu-Natal, and is owned by Independent Newspapers.WebsiteOwned by: Independent Newspaper GroupEditor: Mazwi XabaLanguage: isiZuluCirculation: 74 920Readers: 755 000Mail & GuardianMail & Guardian, formerly the Weekly Mail, was established in 1985 at the height of resistance to apartheid. When foreign donor funding started drying up for anti-apartheid organisations in the late 1980s, many of the country’s alternative newspapers – notably Grassroots, South, New African and New Nation – folded. The Weekly Mail, however, struck up a partnership with the Guardian of London, ensuring the paper’s continued existence. Today, Zimbabwean entrepreneur Trevor Ncube’s company, Newtrust Company Botswana Limited, has a majority share of 87.5% in Mail & Guardian, with the Guardian holding a 10% stake.Website TwitterOwned by: Mail & Guardian MediaEditor: Nic DawesLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 50 230Readers: 428 000Post Post was launched in the mid-1950s as “a racy read, spiced with sex, soccer and news”. Targeted at the Indian communities of KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng, it is owned by Independent Newspapers. Post is published on Wednesdays, with the leisure and sport Weekend Post appearing on Fridays.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Khalil AniffLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 46 490Readers: 429 000Rapport Rapport is South Africa’s national Afrikaans Sunday newspaper. It is distributed countrywide and in Namibia. Owned by Media24, Rapport has the biggest Afrikaans-language market penetration in South Africa.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Media24 Editor: Liza AlbrechtLanguage: AfrikaansCirculation: 242 310Readers: 1 396 000Soccer Laduma A specialist soccer newspaper published on a Wednesday, Soccer Laduma is aimed primarily at young lower-income black men – 87% of its readership is male. It is published by Media24.Website TwitterOwned by: Media24 Editor: Clint RoperLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 313 460Readers: 2 925 000Son The world’s first Afrikaans tabloid, Son emulates British papers such as the Sun, focusing on scandal, gossip, entertainment and sport – and page three girls. The paper appears in four regional editions: Western Cape, Eastern Cape, Northern Cape and the central South African region. It is owned by Media24 and published on Sundays3.Website Owned by: Media24 Editor in Chief: Andrew KoopmanLanguage: AfrikaansCirculation: 65 080 (Sunday)Readers: 389 000 (Sunday)Sunday Independent The Sunday Independent was established in 1995 and aims at readers in the higher-income bracket. Its main sales are in KwaZulu-Natal, Gauteng and the Northern Cape. Its readers are 47% black, 29% black, 11% coloured and 13% Indian. It is owned by Independent Newspapers.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Jovial RantaoLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 40 100Readers: 243 000Sunday Sun Established at the beginning of 2002 and aimed at black readers, Sunday Sun publishes content .largely of a tabloid natur Much of its audience are first-time newspaper readers. Owned by Media24 and published by RCP Media, Sunday Sun is sold countrywide as well as in Botswana, Lesotho and Swaziland.Website: noneOwned by: Media24 Managing editor: Minette FerreiraLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 227 040Readers: 2 371 000Sunday Times Avusa’s Sunday Times is South Africa’s biggest Sunday newspaper, read by 3.8-million people. The paper includes Sunday Times Magazine, Lifestyle, Business Times and Metro sections. Established in 1906, the Sunday Times is distributed all over South Africa and in neighbouring countries such as Lesotho, Botswana and Swaziland.Website FacebookOwned by: Avusa Editor: Ray HartleyLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 462 370Readers: 3 800 000Sunday Tribune The Sunday Tribune caters for KwaZulu-Natal readers. Its is published by Independent Newspapers.Website Owned by: Independent Newspaper Group Editor: Philani MgwabaLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 86 200Readers: 624 000Sunday World The Sunday World, launched in 1999, is a tabloid aimed mainly at black readers. Owned by Avusa, it is distributed in Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and North West.Website Owned by: Avusa Editor: Wally MbheleLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 151 720Readers: 1 680 000Weekend Post Published on a Saturday, the Weekend Post is the major regional weekend newspaper in the Eastern Cape, with its core market in Port Elizabeth. It is owned by Avusa.Website Facebook / TwitterOwned by: Avusa Editor: Jeremy McCabeLanguage: EnglishCirculation: 24 510Readers: 218 000Back to the topSouth Africa’s news websites Independent Online The Independent Newspaper group’s news portal. Full local and international news, plus sections on business, sport, property, careers, technology, travel and more.News24 Media24’s online news portal, in partnership with several newspapers such as Beeld, Die Burger, City Press and Rapport. Full local and international news, plus sections on business, sport, science, motoring and more.Mail & Guardian Online One of the first news sites in Africa, this web companion for the weekly Mail & Guardian newspaper is updated daily with local, business and sports news, and features all the M&G’s insight and analysis, as well as links to The Teacher (the newspaper of the teaching profession), and more.Business Day More than just business news here – the newspaper’s site provides local, world & sports updates, as well online financial calculators and personalised listings of JSE share prices via e-mail.SABCnews.com News site of the South African Broadcasting Corporation. Specialises in breaking news from South Africa and the world, and provides links to audio and video bulletins.Die Burger Die Burger’s site updates breaking news throughout the day. A comprehensive local and international news portal, with all the sections, specials, features and interactivity we’ve come to expect from South African news sites.The Times The Times is the sister publication to South Africa’s best-selling Sunday paper, the Sunday Times. Its approach is to blur the line between print and electronic media, serving up not only news, business and sport, but blogs, podcasts and plenty of video.Business Report Independent Newspapers’ business site provides the top stories and features covering media, marketing and IT.Finance24 Media24’s business site contains breaking news, the latest financial indicators, company results and more.NetAssets Personal finance site pulling material from the Avusa stable. Updated regularly, providing the latest news, market reports, investment advice and a variety of handy online tools.Moneyweb Independent investment information, news, features, analysis and resources.Financial Mail Online features from the magazine. A search facility and archive of back issues makes this a handy business research resource.ITWeb Excellent, comprehensive, continually updating IT, Internet and technology news site.Bizcommunity Advertising and marketing news site.Back to the topRelated articles The media in South AfricaSouth Africa onlineSouth African televisionRadio in South AfricaSouth Africa’s commercial radio stationsSouth Africa’s public broadcasting radio stationsSouth Africa’s community radio stationsUseful links African Editors Forum Audit Bureau of Circulations South Africa Freedom of Expression Institute Institute for the Advancement of Journalism Avusa Journalism.co.za Media Development and Diversity Agency Media Institute of Southern Africa Media24 Press Ombudsman of South Africa Print Media South AfricaSouth African Advertising Research Foundation South African National Editors Forum 36 116 (ABC April-June 2010)last_img read more

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Epic Adventure, — Wet Surprise (GC1YV80) — Geocache of the Week Video Edition

first_imgHiking up to the lake. Photo by geocacher Boonie-Medic Ben, of benandjayme, surveying the lake. Lackey AKprincesswarrior making her way to the island. Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog.If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, just fill out this form. Thanks!Share with your Friends:More [vsw id=”hfFLCVLQZSE” source=”youtube” width=”853″ height=”480″ autoplay=”no”]Geocache Name:Wet Surprise (GC1YV80)Difficulty/Terrain Rating:2/5Why this is the Geocache of the Week:This was an incredible adventure and is a perfect example of how geocaching can take you to places you never would’ve visited without it. For more, check out the video above.What geocachers are saying:“Swam to it in my undies!  I gotta say, in 6+ years of caching, this is probably the coolest cache i’ve done so far…” – Thuescapades“This cache experience was my favorite of all time.” – reidsomething“What an amazing adventure! …Beautiful lake, amazing view of the mountain, and a cache full of awesome swag…what more could a geocacher want??” – AKprincesswarriorWhat the geocache owner, Freak of Nature, has to say:“I’ve always enjoyed geocaching away from urban areas. I have a background in forestry, and love the outdoors…I’ve known about this area since the late seventies. I have backpacked around here many times. Lots of local history here.I love all of the positive feedback! This is really what geocaching means to me. Discovering places and things I might never have known of, but for someone placing a cache nearby.Everybody knows of a special spot or location that means something to them. There are lots of adventures waiting to be had.  Don’t be afraid to share it with others. Thanks to all for this most enjoyable hobbie, and cache on!”Photos:Mount Rainier views on the hike up. What’s most fun you’ve had during a day of geocaching? Tell us and post photos in the comments. SharePrint RelatedThe Geocaching Vlogger — InterviewSeptember 20, 2018In “Community”Find your knight in shining armor. — Castle Northmoor (GCX612) — Geocache of the WeekJuly 30, 2014In “Community”Featured Geocacher of the Month Award WinnersAugust 25, 2011In “Community”last_img read more

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A Better Way to Encourage Efficient New Homes

first_imgDavid Goldstein is co-director of the energy program at the NRDC. This post originally appeared at the NRDC Blog. We hope to find out soonThe Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) — an organization of North American utilities and other efficiency program administrators that supports their members’ work to advance energy efficiency by developing common specifications for efficiency — adopted a specification for efficiency in new homes on January 16, 2018.This spec is based on the Energy Rating Index (ERI), a generic form of the HERS Index. The ERI provides a consistent signal to home builders about the level(s) of higher efficiency that utilities want. It also allows tangential market actors, such as lenders and appraisers, to compare homes’ overall energy performance against each other.Manufacturers are more inclined to make higher efficiency products when they know in advance that utilities throughout the North American market will all be promoting the same level of efficiency. By providing a binational market signal, CEE members can cause manufacturers to offer products at higher levels of efficiency than they could justify otherwise. This dynamic applies to new homes, too: last year just 19 companies built 35% of all single-family homes in America.Housing accounts for one fifth of climate-change-causing emissions, and residential energy accounts for about 4% of household expenditures (almost $2,500 a year, or $75,000 over the life of a mortgage). The CEE specification offers participating utilities the choice of incentivizing one or several levels of efficiency. The mid-range level represents a reduction in energy use of about 40% compared to the energy use of a typical new home that barely meets the state energy code. It could easily save the consumer $500 to $1,000 in annual utility bills.HERS ratings lead to competition between builders for who can build to the lowest score; however this competition is still restrained by the fact that increased energy efficiency often costs more, and the lending system does not yet recognize the value in determining whether a family qualifies for a mortgage. Utilities frequently address this barrier by offering the builder or buyer a cash incentive for efficiency that compensates for the cost increase. (This approach was also used extremely effectively in federal tax incentives for energy-efficient home construction that were in effect from 2005 to 2012.)By setting a specification that includes several very ambitious tiers of HERS/ERI scores, as well as more modest options that can work in areas where efficiency is a new idea, CEE is leading the way in harnessing market forces to work in coordination with energy codes to promote continual improvement in home energy efficiency. The cornerstone of these methods is the HERS Index, a home energy inspection and rating method developed by RESNET, a nonprofit standard-setting organization that NRDC has supported since its inception. Markets in energy efficiency can only work if buyers and sellers have the information needed to evaluate energy efficiency in dollars. Long-term transformation of efficient construction practices relies on allowing stakeholders across the new construction industry to compete for overall home performance, not just incremental improvements in individual technologies.The HERS Index is similar to a miles-per-gallon sticker on a car: it projects energy use compared to a baseline. The baseline score of 100 is based on a house that barely meets the 2006 energy code, while a score of 0 means zero energy use, on net.More than 20% of new homes were rated in 2017, with an average score of 62, which is impressive considering that few entities provide incentives for such ratings. A score of 62 is some 15% better than the requirements of the most advanced model energy code in America. How much better could we do with financial incentives for the lowest scores? RELATED ARTICLES center_img How Is a Home’s HERS Index Calculated?More Than You Ever Wanted to Know About the HERS IndexStates are Amending, then Adopting, the 2015 IECC Why Is the HERS Reference Home Based on an Outdated Energy Code? Study Finds Huge Variation in California HERS Rating ResultsDrainwater Heat Recovery Can Lower Your HERS Score Building a more energy-efficient home can employ many different approaches. The builder can use more insulation and better windows, install ductless heating and cooling systems, orient the house to collect sunshine through the windows in winter and shade them in summer, seal leaks in the walls and ceilings, and assure healthy indoor air 24/7 by providing reliable mechanical ventilation with energy recovery. They can use cool roofs. The list goes on…Traditional building energy codes and efficiency incentives have focused on promoting one or several of these technologies in an inflexible package, requiring specified amounts of insulation in the floor, walls, and roofs, specified heating and cooling efficiency, and a specified maximum air leakage rate. This prescriptive approach succeeds at improving efficiency at low cost, but does not give credit for energy savings from comprehensive or holistic design strategies. Furthermore, the specific measures promoted within codes and incentive programs change over time, causing uncertainty in the industry.Builders therefore tend to resist the prescriptive approach because it reduces their flexibility and is more expensive than it needs to be for any given energy efficiency target.For example, perhaps one of the specified criteria is very expensive to meet for a particular house while another technology that might cost much less could save even more energy.The Natural Resources Defense Council has been working with builders and building efficiency suppliers, as well as with nonprofit efficiency advocates, to introduce the combination of more ambitious energy goals and more flexible ways of meeting them into building energy codes and other market-based programs.last_img read more

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Odisha asks banks to improve cash availability in cyclone affected areas

first_imgOdisha government has asked banks to improve cash availability to enable people in cyclone-affected districts to buy essential items.“Mobile ATMs have been sent to Puri by the State Cooperative Bank and SBI. Now seven mobile ATMs are functioning in Puri,” said Chief Secretary A. P. Padhi, after chairing a Special State Level Bankers Committee meeting here on Friday. “SBI will send 10 more ATMs. Cash availability is not a problem in the State.” Digital payment and cash withdrawal from ATMs were affected as power had not been restored in many areas ever since cyclone Fani hit Odisha on May 3. People were seen standing in long queues in front of the rare functional ATM counters in Bhubaneswar. Unavailability of cash had forced students to go back to their villages. Wage payment to daily labourers was affected.The Odisha government’s decision to hand out ₹2000 in cash as part of the Chief Minister’s package has proved to be of great help.The special State Level Banker’s Committee discussed the measures banks and insurance companies must take in cyclone affected areas. The SLBC resolved that existing loans would be rescheduled and fresh loans would be extended.“The loans may be rescheduled keeping in view the lower cash flow to SHGs and Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises. Bankers would provide all assistance to bail out the tourism industry in Puri. Insurance companies would also relax the document requirements, simplify the process and expedite payment of claims,” it was resolved in the SLBC. The Chief Secretary urged the banks to operationalise all their branches in Puri by Monday. Banking has been largely unaffected in all affected districts except Puri.last_img read more

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