Mentors help ease college transition for new Belles

first_imgSaint Mary’s continued to use peer mentors as an integral part of their Belles Beginnings orientation this year, and according to seniors and current peer mentors Katie Frego and Kristie LeBeau, they will continue to play a large role in the first years’ transition throughout the next semester.Through the program, each first year works with an academic advisor based on her intended major, and each advisor picks a current student within the department to act as a peer mentor for the first years, Frego said.“It’s a great way for incoming freshman to meet others within their major and form strong connections,” she said. “These are the girls [they] will be going through classes with for the next four years.”Peer mentors have played a large role in the Belles Beginnings program for several years, and LeBeau said she appreciated the effort her own peer mentor put into making her transition an easy one. LeBeau first felt nervous when she arrived at the College, she said, but her peer mentor helped ease her nerves.“My peer mentor was really helpful in reassuring me that all of those feelings wouldn’t last long,” LeBeau said. “Seeing how much she loved Saint Mary’s made me hold onto the fact that I would get there one day, too. Now, I want to be that source of reassurance to this new class of Belles.”The peer mentors began their job by moving in early for training, Frego said, during which an alumna of the College hosted a workshop with the students.“She taught us how to facilitate small groups and gave us ice-breaker ideas,” Frego said. “She helped us discover our own passions and how to apply those to our groups. She showed us how to get the girls fired up and excited for the next four years.”According to Frego and LeBeau, peer mentors were very involved with their first-year groups from the start of orientation. They introduced them to campus resources such as the Belles Against Violence Office and assisted them with their class schedules.For LeBeau, acting as a peer mentor has been very rewarding.“I really love getting to know this new class of Belles and doing whatever I can to help them fall in love with Saint Mary’s like I did three years ago,” she said.Frego echoed LeBeau and said she is eager to share her passion about Saint Mary’s with the first years.“I’m so passionate about Saint Mary’s,” she said. “I love it, and I want them to feel the same way I do.”The peer mentors’ roles continues past orientation, Frego said, as they assist with the First-Year Common Course, which all first years are required to take. The class is taught by the academic advisors, and the peer mentors also attend and teach two sessions of the class themselves.“The classes are really focused on diving deeper into the history of Saint Mary’s and the history of Holy Cross,” Frego said.There are 10 sessions of the course, and the first years are also required to attend speeches by President Cervelli and Margaret Atwood, an author visiting campus, Frego said. She said the peer mentors are also helping to plan a visit with the first years to Bertrand, Michigan, where the Sisters of the Holy Cross originally lived.Both Frego and LeBeau believe this class of first years shows great potential for success. Frego said her group of first years are both excited and attentive to their studies, and LeBeau said she believes her first years are ready to handle the stresses of college.“This group of girls seems to have the confidence to take on the world,” LeBeau said. “I look at some of the girls from this class and think, ‘Wow, you are ready for this.’ I don’t remember being that confident as a first year. I think that they are all very prepared — whether they know it or not — and will make a strong class of Belles.”Tags: First Year Common Course, first years, peer mentorslast_img read more

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FlyQuest becomes first esports partner for Fathead

first_imgFlyQuest, an esports organisation that competes in multiple titles, has entered a strategic partnership with Fathead, LLC, a company that sells licensed and custom decor. This is Fathead’s first venture into esports, and this deal will see the company offer licensed FlyQuest gear.Specifically, FlyQuest wall decals, wall murals, and big head cutouts will be made available through Fathead and its third party retailers. These items will be available on FlyQuest’s website and at events, too. Fathead predominantly deals in traditional sports, so FlyQuest becoming the first officially licensed esports organisation partnered with Fathead is a positive step for the scene.Scott Pogrow, Head of Business Development for FlyQuest discussed this partnership in a statement: “We are extremely excited to welcome Fathead into the FlyFam. Fathead is a market leader in creating life-size wall decals and big heads for major sports and entertainment properties, which now includes esports. Their vision aligns closely with ours of being leaders in providing fans the ability to show off their passion. Our partnership with Fathead allows us to do just that.”Robby Hogle, CEO of Fathead also had his say: “Fathead thrives on providing fans with opportunities to express their team pride in a BIG way, so we are thrilled to partner with FlyQuest, an outstanding organization that cares deeply about their fan base. We love FlyQuest’s approach to fan-inspired activations and feel we can further enhance the fan experience. Fathead is committed to the esports space and will continue to grow our presence, and we are excited to take our first step with FlyQuest.”FlyQuest has added Fathead as a partner alongside Snickers and 5-Hour Energy. Fathead is partnered with the likes of Quicken Loads, Amrock, Rock Ventures, and Cleveland Cavaliers, among many other companies.Esports Insider says: Seeing an esports organisation such as FlyQuest in the company of the NFL, NBA, MLB, and NHL is always welcome. Fathead’s offering is a tad out of the norm, we’re definitely looking forward to seeing some big head cutouts of the organisation’s players.last_img read more

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Accident Causes Total Mess on the Turnpike SB at Glades Road

first_imgFlorida Turnpike’s southbound lanes heading from Palm Beach to Broward County have been a total mess Thursday morning.All lanes were at a complete standstill for over an hour following a rollover crash with hazardous material Thursday morning.At least four miles of motorists are stuck on the the southbound lanes between Atlantic Avenue and Glades Road with more than eight miles of overall delay, according to Total Traffic Miami.last_img

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WDFW Approves Three-Day Razor Clam Dig Beginning February 1

first_imgFacebook1.3kTweet0Pin0Submitted by Washington Department of Fish and WildlifeRazor clam diggers can return to various ocean beaches for a three-day opening beginning Friday, February 1.State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig on evening low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates, and evening low tides:February 1; Friday; 4:48 p.m.; 0.2 feet; Twin Harbors, CopalisFebruary 2; Saturday; 5:28 p.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, MocrocksFebruary 3, Sunday; 6:04 p.m.; -0.1 feet; Twin Harbors, CopalisDan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, recommends that diggers hit the beach about an hour or two before low tide for the best results.“Razor clams are relatively easy to dig, they are very good to eat, and they draw friends and families to some of the most beautiful coastlines and communities in the state,” said Ayres.In order to ensure conservation of clams for future generations, WDFW sets tentative razor clam seasons that are based on the results from the annual coast-wide razor clam stock assessment and by considering harvest to date. WDFW authorizes each dig independently after getting the results of marine toxin testing.WDFW has tentatively scheduled another dig for Feb. 15-21 pending results of future toxin tests. More information on planned digs can be found on WDFW’s razor clam webpage at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2018-19 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license (starting at $9.70) to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is the primary state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish and wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fish and wildlife recreational and commercial opportunities. WDFW razor clam digs support outdoor lifestyles and coastal economies. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see https://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html.last_img read more

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Monmouth Park Charity Hosts Annual Fashion Show

first_imgOCEANPORT – The Monmouth Park Charity Fund will be hosting the annual Winner’s Circle Fashion Show Luncheon on Friday, Aug. 24, at Monmouth Park Racetrack.The event will feature fashions presented by Coldwater Creek and Brooks Brothers. Female models will be provided courtesy of Model Team Management LLC of Ocean Grove.Paul G. Gaffney II, president of Monmouth University, will be the guest speaker. The event also will include the presentation of the Volunteer of the Year Award along with a gift auction and 50/50 raffle.Proceeds from the event will benefit the Monmouth Park Charity Fund whose mission it is to raise and distribute funds to nonprofit agencies throughout Monmouth County. These agencies provide services for health care, those at risk in the community and those in need of special services. Since the organization’s inception in 1946, more than $8.7 million has been distributed to local nonprofit agencies providing these services to residents of Monmouth County.Event co-chairs are Eleanor Williams and Denise Martin.Tickets are $55 per person and may be purchased by calling Mary Ann Martin at 732-571-5325 or emailing monmouthparkcharity@verizon.net.last_img read more

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