Backward Metamorphosis of Corruption in Liberia: From Grotesque Public Enemy to Wicked Vampire

first_imgFebruary 1, 2015Simply Thinking ThoughtsIn my thinking thoughts last night I reflected on President Sirleaf’s Annual Message, especially the assertion that corruption had become a blood sucking vampire in Liberia. The assertion caused me to reminisce; when the President first assumed leadership, she declared “Corruption” as enemy number one; 10 years later instead of eliminating this enemy, corruption has metamorphosed into a supernatural vampire that sucks blood.Construct of VampireFor those of you who were around back in the day, there were several episodes of a movie at Roxy and Gabriel Cinemas entitled “Dracula.” Dracula was half human, half bat and had two protruding canine incisor teeth that he used to suck blood from his victims. Surprisingly, as soon as Dracula sucked a victim’s blood, that person suddenly metamorphosed into another Dracula more vicious and ready to suck the blood of other victims. After sucking blood, Dracula would falsely take on human features simply to lure other victims to their destruction. Truly, Dracula was a vicious, wicked blood thirsty vampire. Construct of MetamorphosisI actually understood the process of metamorphosis under Mrs. Esther Kpor, my 10th grade Biology teacher at Tubman High School. Metamorphosis, according to Ma Kpor, was generally a change from something ugly to something beautiful.It begins with a very ugly, grotesque caterpillar with all kinds of itches on it. The itchy ugly caterpillar later covers itself with films and fluids apparently intended to mold, smoothen, nurture, protect and transform itself into a cocoon. After some time, the ugly, grotesque, itchy caterpillar further transforms into a beautiful butterfly that flutters away with exceptional exuberance, as if emancipated from a spell cast by a wicked witch that was finally removed by a gentle fairy godmother. Behold, King Solomon in all his splendor was not as donned and regaled as the butterfly, neither would his chief architect Haram Abeef of Tyre be able to decipher the architecture of the intricate cocoon.Backwards MetamorphosisUnfortunately, metamorphosis in Liberian terms has taken on a kind of peculiar backwards construct; from instead of a beautiful butterfly, to an ugly, grotesque, itchy caterpillar; or from public enemy to wicked vampire.Now, one thing I admire about this President is how she usually does not sugarcoat. When education under her leadership spiraled downwards, she declared it a “mess”; now that she has realized that the whole country, that both government and public sectors are corrupt, she has declared it a bloody blood sucking vampire. Seldom would a leader criticize his/her own government.How Corruption the Vampire Destroys Before I begin receiving writs of summon, let me hastily submit that all of the following ways blood thirsty corrupt vampires are sucking the blood of our economy are all allegations. Firstly, there are government officials who take expensive vacation trips under the guise of official business, while some of them place their girlfriends and relatives in positions for which they hold no qualifications, and award them fabulous salaries. Secondly, some government officials and law makers change the license plates of GOL vehicles and take ownership, while businesses deliberately remove price tags from shelves and bribe commerce inspectors to be silent; these are all corruption.Further, allegations from the University of Liberia is that when students take the entrance exam, they must bribe US$150 to pass, while there are people who sit the WAEC for other people; teachers and civil servants fake credentials and divert GOL funds, while students pay sex and money for grades; witnesses lie in court, while jurors are bribed to award judgment; some married men have deputy wives for finance, operations and administration, while young girls conjure more than one godfather for the rent; procurement procedures and bidding processes are stink with bribery, while police compromise traffic violation penalties with bribes from taxi drivers. It was alleged that a lawmaker, Representative Forh, confessed to a recording of his voice saying, “you eat some I eat some” County Development Fund money; it is alleged that Speaker Alex Tyler was involved in a corrupt deal with a contractor and his fellow lawmakers were questioning his authority toreside over plenary, while his deputy was placed under pressure to submit expenditure reports of a huge sum of GOL oil money. If all of these allegations are proven, it is stinky corruption; and all of the culprits are the band of vampires who are sucking the blood of the economy.Rendezvous with Corruption the Vampire Now, in the vampire movie, Dracula the blood sucking vampire was not the protagonist, but rather the antagonist or the “main bad man.” In the movie, neither guns nor bombs could stop Dracula; hence ridding him of the community was a near dilemma, as he continued to suck blood and kill.Luckily, a way to stop Dracula the Vampire was finally discovered, by driving a 3-foot wedge into the middle of his breast and piercing him so badly that he too bleeds and disintegrates from his supernatural evil body. Those who concur that corruption is a vampire must therefore set up a rendezvous bout with vampires at their locations. As President Sirleaf takes the lead, each Liberian must therefore take up arms of 3-foot wedges and drive them in the middle of the breasts of vampires in their ministries, agencies and business places. But mind you, to drive your wedges, you must have willpower, and blind your eyes to relationships, favoritism, cronyism, and nepotism.A Charge to Keep, a Corruption to FightWhen the President took over, she had vowed to meet corruption head-on as enemy. Probably she had thought over the years that the country would have transformed from a corrupt system to a more stable transparent system where accountability would be commonplace. To the President’s surprise, the country plummeted down an abyss of corrupt schemes, shenanigans and chicaneries. And so instead of transforming her country into a beautiful butterfly, it metamorphosed backwards into an ugly wicked Vampire. Howbeit, the President has a charge to keep, and a band of alleged corrupt vampires to wrestle and evict; an ever dying embattled economy to save and fix to the sky, to “Cement her Legacy”; that charge she must keep; fight corruption tooth and nails with all her mind, body, and soul. With all hands on deck, we will certainly help her win. Will you join the President in the fight against corruption? Please do so, fellow compatriots.I am simply thinking thoughts.About the authorThe Rivercess Village man, Moses Blonkanjay Jackson is a triple Ivy League product, and a Jesuit protégé; Mr. Jackson is a Yale University Mathematics Curriculum Fellow, and a University of Pennsylvania Physics Curriculum Fellow. Mr. Jackson holds a Master of Education degree from Harvard University and a Master of Education with Secondary Mathematics concentration from Saint Joseph’s University. Blonkanjay Jackson is a candidate for the Doctor of Education (EdD). He is presently serving as Assistant Minister for Teacher Education. Blonkanjay can be contacted at 0886 681 315 or 0770 206 645; email: Blonkanjayjackson@gmail.com Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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CANU records whopping increase in cannabis seizures in 2018

first_img– 61 persons charged, 14 convictions in 2018The Customs Anti-Narcotics Unit (CANU) on Thursday revealed that it has recorded a significant increase in the amount of cannabis seized in 2018 when compared to the previous year.Deputy Head of CANU, Lesley RamlallAccording to statistics provided by the drug enforcement body, the unit seized 171.58 kgs cocaine, 543.256 kgs cannabis, 532.8 grams ecstasy, 304 grams of heroin, 100 grams of crystal methamphetamine and 39 grams of cannabis in 2018 against the 291.089 kgs cocaine, 123.799 kgs cannabis and 1.602 kgs of heroin seized in 2017.The unit stated that there was a vast increase in cannabis seized by CANU during 2018, with the spike seen mostly during the June to August period which coincides with the summer vacation.ConvictionsCANU’s Deputy Head, Lesley Ramlall, speaking with the media, related that 61 persons were charged for narcotics-related cases in 2018 with only 14 convictions. Nevertheless, he reported that many other cases are pending while adding that the body will continue to put a dent in the drug trade.Meanwhile, in relation to cases that CANU recorded last year, Ramlall explained that the Special Organised Crime Unit (SOCU) is looking at some since they revolved around money laundering.“Currently there are eight…matters that were handed over to SOCU from 2017 to date for money laundering…. As it relates to Shervington Lovell, I know that currently SOCU was tasked to look at that with the seizure of his assets, we have managed to identify most of his assets and those were handed over to SOCU and Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU). So I know they were tasked to deal with that”, Lovell added.Meanwhile, with regard to CANU’s seizure of vehicles that belong to drug traffickers, Ramlall added that this remains part of CANU’s job among other things.“A lot of vehicles on the road belong to drug traffickers that we have arrested and were prosecuted, those vehicles are currently in the court system and we are going after the forfeiture. I know thus far, in 2019, after we started, that is, we have so far got two vehicles out of the court system that were forfeited to the Government of Guyana and so we continue to aggressively go down that road so it is not only about seizing of narcotics and prosecuting traffickers but also going after their assets”, he stated.Ramlall admitted that most of the cases are interlinked to money laundering and as such, it is necessary for CANU to work with various agencies.Foreign mulesRamlall believes that based on their intelligence gathering, no longer are foreign nationals prepared to hand over narcotics to their Guyanese counterparts as was traditionally done.He explained that the foreign nationals are now bringing the narcotics and working alongside their local counterparts to smuggle same out of the country.This development, he noted, certainly poses a higher degree of risks for drug enforcement officers and other law enforcement agencies. He noted that with this new development, they anticipate foreigners importing arms and ammunition and may very well start retaliating once intercepted.last_img read more

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Philosophy Roundup

first_imgPhilosophy of science is a broad discipline incorporating many sub-disciplines such as intellectual history, sociology, ethics, rhetoric, logic, demarcation of science from pseudoscience, classification, discovery, verification, explanation and more.  A dozen recent news stories discussed some of these topics.Medical ethics:  PhysOrg reproduced an AP story about medical research on humans in the US in the 1940s to 1960s.  The details are quite shocking and were “unusually unethical, even at the time.”  They included giving diseases to prisoners and the disabled.  The news media largely ignored these stories, the article said.  This entry touches on the need to set ethical limitations on scientific inquiry.Futurism, ethics, and health:  Should genetic interventions be used to create healthy babies?  This sensitive question, behind which lurks the ghost of positive eugenics, was discussed cheerfully in Science Magazine (25 February 2011: DOI: 10.1126/science.1204088) on the 10th anniversary of the Human Genome Project.    “Genetics is a way of thinking.  Genomics is a set of tools,” Mary-Claire King wrote, glossing over the potential for abuse of thinking and tools.  “If we think rigorously about genetics and use these tools well,” she said, “the resolution of inherited disorders on behalf of our patients will be bounded only by our imaginations.  One healthy infant at a time is not a bad way to begin.”    But how will babies born without genetic intervention be treated by society?  King assumed universal agreement on the meaning of well and spoke of rigor, good and bad as if bounded only by human imagination.  A quick look back at the 20th century shows some not-so-cheerful ways our predecessors applied their imaginations using thinking and tools.Philosophy of discovery:  A story on PhysOrg exemplified how, in the philosophy of science, discovery is distinct from explanation.  Some mathematicians at Emory University were on a nature hike when a “Eureka!” moment hit them.  “So what is an ‘aha’ moment?” the article asked.  “The way I see it, it’s not something that happens to you instantly,” said Ken Ono.  “It just happens to be the moment that you realize the fruits of all your hard work.”  Article includes a video clip of Ono telling his story on the trail.Paradigms and models:  Some European philosophers have tried to put Thomas Kuhn on a chip.  In “Emergence and Decline of Scientific Paradigms” described on PhysOrg, they produced a mathematical model showing how scientific paradigms rise and fall.  “Although many factors influence the emergence and decline of such scientific paradigms,” the article said, “a new model has captured how these ideas spread, providing a better understanding of paradigm shifts and the culture of innovation.”    Like some meta-theory on theories, or observation of observers, their mathematical model had all the coldness of monitoring bacteria in a Petri dish.  Paradigms mentioned included “climate change, nanotechnology and chaos theory”.  Not apparent was how their model intersected any conception of validation, verification, or truth.History of science:  An article at PhysOrg might be enough to make a modern scientist scream.  Dr. Lawrence Principe, historian of science at Johns Hopkins, is defending alchemy as legitimate research for its time.  In “Why many historians no longer see alchemy as an occult practice,” Phillip Schewe wrote that “the scholars who write the history of science and technology no longer lump alchemy in with witchcraft as a pseudo-science.”  Instead they view it as a precursor to chemistry.    Alchemists, they said, should not be dismissed solely for failing their main mission to turn base metals into gold; “Alchemists … were active in assaying metals, refining salts, making dyes and pigments, making glass and ceramics, artificial fertilizers, perfumes, and cosmetics” – i.e., skills useful for the emerging science of chemistry.  Famous practitioners of alchemy included Robert Boyle and Isaac Newton.Design detection:  “How nature’s patterns form” was the headline of a short article on PhysOrg.  With an image of a Fibonacci spiral pattern leading the story, the article mentioned how many universal patterns, seen in sunflowers, galaxies, animal coloration or sand dunes are the result of “some kind of stress, applied stress.”  Alan Newell at the University of Arizona was telling a meeting of the AAAS that “biological forms are controlled more by the laws of physics than by evolution,” i.e., “the products of physical forces, rather than evolutionary ones.”    Further, “Patterns arise when the symmetry of a system is broken, Newell said.  The similarity in patterns from system to system occur when the systems have similar symmetry, rather than because the systems are made from the same materials.”  Newell believes patterns are impressed on nature mechanically, but as “a consequence of biochemically and mechanically induced pattern-forming instabilities” that can be described in mathematical models.    The short article did not address why natural laws and instabilities should be symmetric, or finely tuned to reproduce a Fibonacci series, or why the human mind finds these patterns beautiful.  Newell did end, though, on a poetic note: “Mathematics is like a good poem, which separates the superfluous from the essentials and fuses the essentials into a kernel of truth.”Verification and falsification:  Nature News reported that the Apex Chert in western Australia, thought to be evidence for the oldest life on the planet, may have formed by inorganic processes.  This incident touches on several areas in philosophy of science: verification, interpretation of evidence, ethics, and history of science: “Twenty years ago the palaeontological community gasped as geoscientists revealed evidence for the oldest bacterial fossils on the planet,” the article said.  “Now, a report in Nature Geoscience shows that the filament structures that were so important in the fossil descriptions are not remnants of ancient life, but instead composed of inorganic material.”    This appears to be a case of scientists who “wanted to find life so badly that they ignored the obvious,” the article said.  Olcutt Marshall opened some philosophical cans of worms with his remark, “There is a willful blindness about these structures that sometimes has more to do with local politics than global truth.”  See also the PhysOrg write-up.Paradigm backlash:  As successful as Newtonian mechanical philosophy was in the 17th and 18th centuries, it produced a backlash, wrote George Rousseau in a book review in Nature (24 Feb 2011, doi:10.1038/470462a).  Commenting on Stephen Gaukroger’s new book The Collapse of Mechanism and the Rise of Sensibility: Science and the Shaping of Modernity 1680�1760, Rousseau noted that while most scientists are aware of Newton’s achievement, “Less familiar is the philosophical phase that followed – sensibility, the view of humans as organic creatures, incapable of reduction to the sum of their mechanical parts, especially in the affective, moral and political realms.”  Accordingly, “Stephen Gaukroger explains how the philosophies of mechanism collapsed over eight decades, to be replaced by a more sensory view of nature.”    The review warned of simplistic views of mechanical philosophy (sometimes abbreviated mechanism): “Mechanism was never a single set of principles about machine-like systems,” he said.  “It comprised an array of disparate beliefs, experiences and practices that were followed in far-flung places and presided over by its principal architects: Ren� Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke and Newton.”    Sensibility, likewise, “is a vague term,” he said.  According to Gaukroger, sensibility “allows connections to be made between natural-philosophical and moral, political, and psychological theories in a new way, shaping a new field of the moral sciences.”  While a strict mechanist or 20th-century positivist might take issue with that phrase as an oxymoron, the definition points out the necessity of philosophical judgments on the nature of science.    The 1760s, the review said, was a watershed decade and the start of the so-called Romantic era with roots in sensibility stretching back a century or more:Imaginative literature, later codified as ‘Romantic’, also drove nails into mechanism’s coffin by postulating that matter was more complex than the mechanical natural philosophers thought.  A human is not a mere machine; a fly is much harder to study than a pebble.  By focusing on human nature rather than physical matter, the language of the new literature helped to alter the way scientists conceived their models, and enabled modernity to commence its work.It is ironic that the reviewer shares a surname with Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778), an icon of Romanticism.Search for extra-terrestrial science:  Can scientists justify their work based on what they expect to find, rather than what they have found?  Rowan Hooper on New Scientist recouped the latest scoop on planet counts from the Kepler spacecraft, then launched into some philosophy: “Exoplanet findings spark philosophical debate,” he titled his article, noting that “What were once speculative and philosophical questions are now being tackled with real data, generated by NASA’s planet-hunting space telescope, Kepler.”  The word data is a philosophically-loaded question.  To what extent does data about extrasolar planets apply to the question of extraterrestrial intelligence?    Hooper heard two speakers at the recent AAAS meeting discuss how Christians and Muslims might respond positively to detection of aliens.  “Both their arguments amounted to the (to my mind) rather dubious claim that the discovery of extraterrestrial life would pose no challenge or crisis to terrestrial religion.”    Then he heard talks about the possibility of life detection by a pessimist, Howard Smith [Harvard-Smithsonian Institute for Astrophysics] and an optimist, Seth Shostak [SETI Institute].  Worried that it might take 100 generations to get in touch with aliens, Smith coined a new phrase: “the misanthropic principle says that intelligent life is so unlikely to evolve that we might as well accept that we’ll never know if we are unique or not.”  Hooper seemed to prefer Shostak’s enthusiastic prediction of successful detection within 24 years, even though it was couched in a philosophical statement, “Believing there aren’t ETs is believing in miracles.”Demarcation:  According to Research Professional John Beddington, the President’s science advisor, made waves by calling for scientists to be “grossly intolerant” of what he perceives as pseudoscience.  As for what constitutes pseudoscience, Beddington referred to “the building up of what purports to be science by the cherry-picking of the facts and the failure to use scientific evidence and the failure to use scientific method.”  Particularly, he had in mind “politically or morally or religiously motivated nonsense.”    Beddington apparently does not realize that the demarcation problem and the scientific method are issues that loom large in philosophy of science.  The assumption that science can be reduced to a bias-free method apparently motivated his sermon for scientists to be as grossly intolerant of that sort of thing as they are of racism or “homophobia.”  He views religious or political influence as “pernicious,” but he left begging the question of whether secular consensus science itself is free of such influences.    Sensing a little unease with his own moral plea, Beddington told his audience, “I’d urge you, and this is a kind of strange message to go out, but go out and be much more intolerant”  That is clearly a moral judgment, not a scientific finding.  Beddington also did not distinguish “morally … motivated nonsense” from his own moral judgments.  Whether or not one agrees with his opinions, the story illustrates how science is inextricable from moral values.Sociology of OOL:  As a reporter at a recent conference of origin-of-life researchers, Dennis Overbye, writing for the New York Times, seemed amused by the curious sociology of his subjects:Two dozen chemists, geologists, biologists, planetary scientists and physicists gathered here recently to ponder where and what Eden might have been.  Over a long weekend they plastered the screen in their conference room with intricate chemical diagrams through which electrons bounced in a series of interactions like marbles rattling up and down and over bridges through one of those child’s toys, transferring energy, taking care of the business of nascent life.  The names of elements and molecules tripped off chemists’ tongues as if they were the eccentric relatives who show up at Thanksgiving every year.While not unkind to their ramblings, Overbye found plenty of confusion, disagreement, and ignorance to showcase.  His last quip was about Craig Venter’s intelligent design project to create synthetic life: “And so his genome is now in the process of acquiring its first, non-Darwinian mutation.”Science and Meaning  What does science mean?  In the New York Review of Books, Freeman Dyson discussed information theory and the history of science under the headline, “How We Know.”  In the body of his book review of The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood by James Gleick, Dyson, while trying to clear up some misinformation, exposed some embarrassments in science that call into question not only how we know, but what we know:The public has a distorted view of science, because children are taught in school that science is a collection of firmly established truths.  In fact, science is not a collection of truths.  It is a continuing exploration of mysteries.  Wherever we go exploring in the world around us, we find mysteries.  Our planet is covered by continents and oceans whose origin we cannot explain.  Our atmosphere is constantly stirred by poorly understood disturbances that we call weather and climate.  The visible matter in the universe is outweighed by a much larger quantity of dark invisible matter that we do not understand at all.  The origin of life is a total mystery, and so is the existence of human consciousness.  We have no clear idea how the electrical discharges occurring in nerve cells in our brains are connected with our feelings and desires and actions.    Even physics, the most exact and most firmly established branch of science, is still full of mysteries….Scientists get a kick out of the endless quest: “The vision of the future as an infinite playground, with an unending sequence of mysteries to be understood by an unending sequence of players exploring an unending supply of information, is a glorious vision for scientists,” he said, but not to artists, writers, and ordinary people.  Dyson worried about the flood of information around us being separated from meaning.  “Now we can pass a piece of human DNA through a machine and rapidly read out the genetic information,” Dyson noted, “but we cannot read out the meaning of the information.  We shall not fully understand the information until we understand in detail the processes of embryonic development that the DNA orchestrated to make us what we are.”    Claude Shannon, who felt “Meaning is irrelevant” to his information theory, started a “flood of information in which we are drowning,” Dyson said.  Is our fate to look out upon, as Jorge Luis Borges portrayed the universe in 1941, a “library, with an infinite array of books and shelves and mirrors,” never knowing what it all means?  “It is our task as humans to bring meaning back into this wasteland,” Dyson concluded.  “As finite creatures who think and feel, we can create islands of meaning in the sea of information.”    While Dyson examined the definition of information in detail in his review, he left dangling an even more important definition: the meaning of meaning.  Is meaning defined by the individual artist, writer, or ordinary person?  Who decides when something is meaningful?  Are islands of meaning grounded on a continent of truth, or are they adrift in an infinite sea of meaningless information?For a look at some of these issues from proponents of intelligent design, see an examination of Freeman Dyson’s article by Denyse O’Leary on Uncommon Descent, another O’Leary article on Uncommon Descent about origin-of-life science, a treatment of Beddington’s outrage against pseudoscience on the blog Darwin’s God by Cornelius Hunter and O’Leary.  In a subsequent post on Uncommon Descent, O’Leary quoted Frank Furedi who views Beddington’s intolerance as a fast-backward to the Middle Ages.    There’s a new anthology of essays by creationists that calls into question the objectivity of science.  The description of Sacred Cows In Science: No Objectivity Allowed, Norbert Smith (ed.) on Amazon.com states,Science was at one time defined by its method.  Carefully controlled experiments, provisional conclusions, and considered debate once defined the field.  But those days have passed.  Today, science is defined by public policy statements, consensus, and a set of metaphysical assumptions that cannot be directly tested.  Students are told that science is in conflict with “faith” or, worse yet, that faith operates in a different “magisterial” [sic]with no real application to the world we inhabit.Chapters include material on life sciences, physical sciences, and behavioral sciences.  The first reviewer agreed, “Science should be a discipline based on dissent, but as more and more science becomes publicly funded, ideas become entrenched, and outside ideas are no longer heard.”This is all interesting material with too much to comment on in each article.  Readers are encouraged to become knowledgeable about these controversies with the Baloney Detector in good working order and refine their philosophy of science in light of these real-world issues.  Science is what scientists do – unless they can defend aspiring to an unattainable goal.    One overriding theme in all the above is how science and philosophy are both human enterprises, subject to all the biases, assumptions, limitations, mistakes, and changes of mind connected with any other human activity.  One can hope to approach limitations with more clarity in a systematic way, but they are still limitations.    One thing we need more than science or philosophy is wisdom.  The writer of Psalm 119 offered a way up: “I have more understanding than all my teachers, for your testimonies are my meditation.” (verse 99).  Indeed, the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom (Proverbs 9:10), and of knowledge (Proverbs 1:7).    Why is the fear of the Lord essential?  Why is it the beginning of wisdom and knowledge?  Because without it, science is impossible.  The Lord is the source of the morality, integrity, and wisdom needed to even hope for a clear scientific understanding about any subject – or a philosophy of anything.    Atheists may do science, but they cannot justify what they do.  When they assume the world is rational, approachable, and understandable, they plagiarize Judeo-Christian presuppositions about the nature of reality and the moral need to seek the truth.    As an exercise, try generating a philosophy of science from hydrogen coming out of the big bang.  It cannot be done.  It’s impossible even in principle, because philosophy and science presuppose concepts that are not composed of particles and forces.  They refer to ideas that must be true, universal, necessary and certain.    It’s time science gets back to the beginning of wisdom.  You can help by rapping a scientist’s knuckles every time he steals from the Christian smorgasbord of presuppositions.  While bandaging his knuckles, encourage him with the upside of a scientific revolution based on the Bible: it makes genuine scientific knowledge, if not exhaustive, at least possible.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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From Pre to Post: Watch the Creative Process Unfold

first_imgThe creative process can be an absolute grind when trying to develop a film or video project. Let these production videos stoke your creative fires!Top image: Quentin Tarantino via HypeBeastThe production process, no matter if it’s film or video, starts with development and pre-production then ends with post-production and distribution. However, getting from A to Z is an incredibly involved process and it can test your patience and resolve. Because of this there may be times where your creativity is stymied and your inspiration is low. Well, never fear. There’s plenty of inspiration out there for you — if you know where to look.We’ve rounded up our favorite inspirational spots on the web for each phase of production. Sit back and relax and watch the creative process come to life.DevelopmentDeveloping your idea is the most important step of the process. You’ve got to get your idea locked down, or as an intellectual property lawyer would say, get it fixed in a tangible medium of expression. During this early development process, you’ll write a treatment and then write a script. You’ll also want to file your work with the USPTO, then develop your proposal for your pitch.Let’s start with Quentin Tarantino as he discusses below that you always start with the script and the individual pages of that script. Then we’ll listen to great advice from Martin Scorsese, J.J. Abrams and Dax Shepard.Quentin Tarantino on Focusing on the PageVideo via Script MailerMartin Scorsese on Plot vs StoryVideo via SigmaEchoJJ Abrams on the Mystery of StoryVideo via TED Dax Shepard on the Art of the PitchVideo via American ExpressPre-ProductionOnce you have a well-developed story, you’ll want to start the planning and design process, which is the art of pre-production. This is where you’ll build your film before you ever call “action” on set. Elements of this process include storyboarding, concept design, scouting, and set design. This part of the process can be incredibly fun, as you can really be creative and discover exactly how your film or video will look when it’s done.Storyboarding the Pixar WayVideo via Daniel GarciaWish I Was Here Concept ArtVideo via WishIWasHereMovieThe Live of a Location ScoutVideo via CBS NewsTop 10 Movie Sets Ever BuiltVideo via CineFixProductionWhen you’ve developed the script and planned your shots, you’re ready to go right into production. Just remember, filmmaking is an incredible process. You wont master it overnight. It’ll take years to find your way — and that’s okay. The process of actually capturing your film or video project can be daunting. It can feel like an uphill climb. With this in mind, let’s get inspired by a few master filmmakers.Martin ScorseseVideo via BAFTA GuruJoss WhedonVideo via BAFTA GuruRon HowardVideo via BAFTA GuruJ.J. AbramsVideo via BAFTA GuruPost-ProductionSo you’ve shot your film or video and now you’re ready to actually put the project together. The act of post-production entails editing the project, color grading the project, adding music to the project, as well as visual effects.This process can take as long or longer than the other sections of the entire process combined. During post-production your resolve may begin to wane. You’ll need to remain positive and enthusiastic in order to push yourself toward the finish line, as the following videos will show.Editing the AvengersVideo via AvidIndustrial Light & Magic Animation Magic of Pirates of the Caribbean 3Video via ILMVisualFXColor Grading O Brother, Where Art Thou?Video via Chris FrancisAre you pumped? Are you inspired? Are you ready to rule the world? Got any additional sources of video inspiration? Share them with us in the comments below.last_img read more

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Citizens Group Presents Needy St. James Resident with New Home

first_img The house is valued at approximately $450,000 JP and member of the Watson Town Community Benevolent Society, Hume Innis said that the house will be painted shortly Story Highlights Indigent resident of the community of Dumfries in Eastern St. James, Dudley Jackson, can now live in comfort having received a new one-bedroom unit from the Watson Town Community Benevolent Society on Tuesday, September 10.The house, which has been furnished, is valued at approximately $450,000.Mr. Jackson’s plight came to the attention of the society, which then organised fund raising initiatives and established partnerships with its members and local businesses in and around the community and parish.The Society was also assisted by a member of Mr. Jackson’s family, who made it possible for the house to be completed, allaying fears that he could be seriously hurt or killed, if a hurricane should strike.Justice of the Peace and member of the Watson Town Community Benevolent Society, Hume Innis said that the house will be painted shortly.“Through fund raising initiatives, the project was undertaken and completed and we are today, proudly handing over this completed unit to him…despite the difficulties experienced in securing funding for the project, the Society remains committed to assisting our citizens whenever and wherever possible,” Mr. Innis pointed out.Commending members of the group for the tremendous demonstration of love and concern for the less fortunate, returning resident, Roy Russell said the gesture represents what can be accomplished when communities work together.“This is love and if the community within this district, behave the same way as this (Benevolent Society) group behave, then we should be on our way overcoming a lot of our obstacles and challenges as a community and as a country.  We need to wake up and unite and link ourselves together in love and assist those among us that are in need,” Mr. Russell urged.President of the Watson Town Community Benevolent Society, Rita Spence, told JIS News that the completion and handing over of the unit to Mr. Jackson was the first project of the Society and that plans were underway for other projects in the community. The completion and handing over of the unit was the first project of the Society last_img read more

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