UBM Completes Canon Deal Says Print Sales Continue Decline

first_imgUBM also reported that year-to-date profits for its events unit are up more than 20 percent to roughly $94.2 million while its data service and online business saw profits slide 7.1 percent to about $32.7 million. Profits for its targeting, distribution and monitoring business stayed flat at about $49.1 million.Overall, UBM’s total adjusted operating profits through the first nine months grew 8 percent to $172.5 million. London-based United Business Media says it has completed its $287 million acquisition of medical industry publisher and event producer Canon Communications. The deal agreement was announced mid-September.UBM also has released an interim management statement detailing the company’s performance through the third quarter. Print sales, the company says, are down 15.3 percent to approximately $163.7 million over the nine-month period. That’s an underlying decline of 7.2 percent, adjusted for discontinued publications. Although UBM did not shutter any print titles during the third quarter it has ceased publishing at least 15 magazines since September 2009. Meanwhile, adjusted operating profit for its print magazines grew to about $5.6 million from $2 million last year.In the statement, UBM says it will continue to actively manage its print portfolio. A UBM spokesperson did not immediately return a request seeking comment concerning the company’s future plans for the 24 print titles it added as a result of the Canon acquisition.last_img read more

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HTC shows off the Vive Cosmos VR headset

first_img Now playing: Watch this: Comment Share your voice VR games you need to start playing right away 1 HTC Vive See It VR games on CNET Preview • Here’s what it’s like to use the HTC Vive, the $799 VR headset that you can preorder today Mentioned Above HTC Vive CNET may get a commission from retail offers. 9 Photos $499 $689 Walmart 1:47 See it Review • HTC Vive review: Yes, this is the best VR experience, if you’ve got the space The Vive Cosmos has six cameras. HTC HTC has unveiled the look of its next Vive virtual reality headset, with the Cosmos to have a flip-up design, six cameras, detachable headphones, a faceplate and a vented front. Billed as a premium PC VR system, the Cosmos, first teased at CES 2019 in Las Vegas in January, will have “striking graphics [and] lifelike sound,” HTC said Friday. HTC Vive Pro Eye tracks your eyes with pinpoint accuracy,… Mobile Gadgets Gaming Accessories Gaming Virtual Reality Apps Up close with the HTC Vive Pro Tags The Cosmos will have a “pixel-packed” display that minimizes the screen-door effect of using VR systems, HTC said. The company also touted its new tracking system.”With wide and accurate tracking, gesture controls and a six-degrees-of-freedom (6DoF) headset and controller setup, Vive Cosmos promises a deeply engaging VR experience,” HTC said.htc-vive-cosmos-vr-headset HTC The system can be used straight out of the box with minimal setup and also features a more comfortable headset with soft, light and breathable material, HTC said. The company also unveiled new Vive controllers that it called gamer friendly, versatile and practical.htc-vive-cosmos-controllerThe new Vive Cosmos controllers. HTC HTC said it’ll reveal the official specs next week.HTC’s Viveport Infinity unlimited subscription service launched April 2, with subscriptions costing $13 a month or $99 for an entire year. The service lets customers download more than 600 VR games and apps through the Viveport store. This morning we unveiled the HTC VIVE COSMOS, with 6 cameras, a flip up design, detachable headphones, faceplate & vented front. Next week, we’ll get into specs. Stay tuned. https://t.co/TSCJVM9eLs #HTCVIVE #HTCVIVECOSMOS— HTC VIVE (@htcvive) June 21, 2019 HTC had first looked to end the drought of VR content by launching the Viveport subscription service back in 2017, giving Vive headset owners up to five titles at a time for $9 a month. It then expanded the service in August 2018 to support rival Oculus Rift headsets. HTClast_img read more

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Can the Market Deliver the Consolidated FinTech Tool Small Businesses Need

first_img 5 min read Register Now » Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. For most of us, payday is a relief. For the typical small business owner, it’s a nail-biter.In her latest book, “Fintech, Small Business & the American Dream,” Karen G. Mills, senior fellow at Harvard Business School, shares one entrepreneur’s payday struggles. In chapter eight, Mills profiles a brewery owner who isn’t sure whether she can afford to pay both her team and her vendors. Until she strings together data from dozens of apps and accounts, she doesn’t know whether her business will be in the black or red that month.If you think Mills might have cherry-picked her example, consider that 63 percent of small business owners surveyed by online lender Kabbage say they’re regularly stressed about cash flow. The problem is so persistent that more than half of them had even gone multiple months without paying themselves.Entrepreneurship is financially risky, to be fair. But the brewery owner’s struggles — scattered services, insufficient data and a lackluster user experience — are ones Mills argues the market can solve.Related: 10 Expert Tips on Managing Cash Flow as a New BusinessThree Providers, One PlatformAt present, three companies seem poised to fulfill Mills’ vision for small business leaders. Although none yet offers a one-stop fintech tool, they’ve each got a good chance of becoming one. Intuit, provider of QuickBooks, TurboTax and Mint, has the most tools but arguably the greatest challenges ahead of it. Not only do QuickBooks, TurboTax and Mint each have their own use cases, but they command loyalty from distinctly different user bases.The reason is based in Intuit’s business strategy. Since its founding in 1983, Intuit has made at least 28 acquisitions to broaden its service offerings. For online banking software, it bought Digital Insight in late 2006. The next year, it acquired Electronic Clearing House for check-processing power. That same month, it purchased Homestead Technologies for the company’s e-commerce tools. In 2009, it added online payroll processing by acquiring PayCycle.Intuit’s challenge is now consolidating all of those services and more within a single interface. Before it can truly be called the fintech platform to rule them all, Intuit needs to show it has the brand strength and UX skills to build a unified customer experience.Related: Can FinTech Really Help Small Businesses?Contemporary CompetitionThe second company working toward Mills’ dream for entrepreneurs has precisely the opposite issues of Intuit: Small business lending platform Kabbage may have mastered its niche, but it’s missing many of the peripheral financial services that small business owners need.Kabbage’s main challenge stems from the fact that it’s barely a decade old. Because it grew up in the digital era, Kabbage gives small business owners the ability to link third-party business accounts, such as Amazon sales and UPS shipping data, to be approved for funding in minutes. But because it came of age so recently, Kabbage could struggle for traction in spaces like tax preparation, business budgeting and credit card processing — areas that larger peers like Intuit are sure to fight for.What Kabbage lacks in scale, however, it may be able to make up for with its user experience. Because of its digital roots, Kabbage’s user experience beats that of many traditional banks. When UserZoom compared it to Wells Fargo, the UX researcher found that Kabbage users were 16% more successful at identifying the true cost of a 12-month loan than those who do business with the major bank.Related: How Fintech Advances Are Creating New Opportunities for Micro-BusinessesSquaring OffFounded in 2009, Square is another digital native that may fulfill Mills’ vision. Its advantages and challenges, however, are different than the ones Kabbage faces.Although Square has an app, the truth is that most small business owners see it as a point-of-sale solution. Mention Square, and most will think first about the company’s iPad-like register terminals. Despite the fact that it also offers payroll services and small business loans, Square has struggled to brand itself as more than a credit card processor.To be sure, point-of-sale and card-processing tools are critical to many small businesses, particularly those in the retail space. But at present, Square’s offerings are missing the data feeds that small business owners need. Its Square Capital page claims that application is easy, but it also notes that small business owners’ eligibility “comes down to [their] history with Square.” If Square hopes to be a one-stop platform, it needs a richer array of data feeds. Given the walled garden it’s built, that’s going to be difficult.As Mills makes clear, multiple financial firms have cobbled together pieces of her “one platform” ideal. Intuit has the breadth, Kabbage has the data and Square has the hardware to stay top of mind. Which will win? That’s a question that only small business owners can answer. May 27, 2019 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globallast_img read more

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