Beginning Farmers

first_imgStarting in October, a new training program will offer beginning and young farmers crash courses in business planning, vegetable and fruit production and goat husbandry to provide them with a strong foundation to help grow their new businesses. The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, UGA Small Business Development Center, Georgia Organics, Fort Valley State University and AgSouth Farm Credit, along with other partners, are developing the training and mentoring program to help beginning farmers become successful and sustainable farmers.The partnership will provide training to 70 new farmers, focusing on minority farmers and farmers with limited means. The USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture announced Feb. 2 that the partnership would receive a Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Grant of $652,000 to establish an innovative training program that can be presented throughout the state. “Many of the young people interested in farming don’t come from a farming background,” said Julia Gaskin, director of UGA’s Sustainable Agriculture Program. “We have been very interested in developing a comprehensive training program to help this group and those currently farming that want to improve their operations.” The statewide partnership also includes UGA Extension’s county agents, the Department of Agriculture and the Georgia Fruit & Vegetable Growers Association. “We think this collaborative approach will give us a good foundation for a strong program for the state’s beginning farmers,” Gaskin said.This grant is part of more than $18 million in NIFA funding to support beginning farmers. The core of the training program is business planning. The UGA Small Business Development Center — a unit of the Office of Public Service and Outreach — and AgSouth Farm Credit will provide business planning and financing workshops to the farmers. “To assure a continued sound agriculture industry in our nation, it is essential that we provide financial literacy and risk management training for the next generation of farmers,” said Van McCall, director of the AGAware program for AgSouth. “AgSouth Farm Credit has made a commitment to the future of agriculture through the development of our national award-winning AGAware program. We are very excited for the opportunity to partner in this program.” AgSouth Farm Credit launched a young and beginning farmers training program in 2013 with AGAware, a series of business skills workshops focusing on business planning, marketing and Farm Services Agency and Small Business Administration programs. Georgia Organics will help develop training for farmers interested in small fruit and vegetable production and coordinate the hands-on training that will offer internships and/or mentoring experiences. “Beginning farmers face many obstacles, and successful, established farmers offer a wealth of expertise to help them succeed,” said Alice Rolls, executive director of Georgia Organics. “We look forward to connecting these new growers with producers who have been there, and to the rewarding work of feeding their communities.” Tom Terrill, a small ruminant expert at Fort Valley State University will lead the development of the small ruminant training. The training is based on the highly successful Master Goat Producers classes that have been run in north Georgia. The demand for sheep and goat products has been growing, and this training will teach new farmers the basics on how to be successful with their herds. “Goat production is an ideal enterprise for beginning farmers because of (growing) demand for goat meat in the United States and because they do not require an intensive system,” Terrill said. “Goats can utilize brush, broadleaf weeds and grasses on marginal land and still be productive.” The UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will lead the grant and provide additional training in small fruit and vegetable production.For more information about Georgia’s Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program, see www.SustainAgGA.org.last_img read more

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Memorial Mile set for Monday

first_imgELLSWORTH — The James Russell Wiggins Down East Family YMCA will hold its annual Main Street Memorial Mile on Monday.The one-mile course will start at the Ellsworth Chamber of Commerce and wind down High Street and Main Street before ending at R.F. Jordan’s on Water Street.All proceeds will benefit the DEFY camp scholarship fund and the Beth C. Wright Cancer Resource Center.Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. at the Ellsworth Chamber of Commerce, and the race begins at 9. The cost is $10 per runner or walker. The first 75 who register will receive a T-shirt.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textFind more information and a registration form online at defymca.org, or call 667-3086.last_img read more

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Women’s World Cup 2019: Penalty punishment changed after outcry

first_imgThe rule has drawn much criticism, though, with England goalkeeper Karen Bardsley among those to speak out against it, and the Premier League confirmed VAR will not be used to check for such an offense by goalkeepers next term.And while the IFAB stands by the new rule, the body approved FIFA’s request to stop an automatic yellow card being issued to goalkeepers should they break the rule during a penalty shootout.”The IFAB board of directors today approved a request from FIFA for a temporary dispensation relating to Kicks from the Penalty Mark (KFPM) in Law 10 – Determining the Outcome of a Match at the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2019,” a statement read.”The IFAB fully supports goalkeepers being penalized for not conforming with the Laws of the Game and gaining an unfair advantage.”However, for any KFPM during the knockout stages of the ongoing FIFA Women’s World Cup 2019 in France, a temporary dispensation has been given to FIFA from the requirement to caution a goalkeeper who is penalized for an offense which results in a kick being retaken.”Absolutely gutted. So proud to be part of this squad. What a journey and dream come true to play at a World Cup. Thank you Scotland for the support. We’ll come back stronger pic.twitter.com/KgcDBOjqnW— Caroline Weir (@itscarolineweir) June 21, 2019Pierluigi Collina, chairman of FIFA’s refereeing committee, meanwhile, feels the implementation of the new rule has been correct. Who will win Women’s World Cup 2019? Updated odds entering round of 16 Women’s World Cup 2019: USA ‘motivated and hungry’ for Spain matchup, coach Jill Ellis says It has caused controversy, with the use of VAR meaning goalkeepers have been penalized, and then booked, for moving a matter of inches only moments before spot-kicks have been taken.Scotland’s Lee Alexander was the latest and highest-profile culprit, with her slight encroachment costing Shelley Kerr’s team a place in the knockout rounds Wednesday when Argentina fought back to 3-3 draw. Related News “We discussed this matter with players and coaches and eventually decided to help goalkeepers by allowing them to have only one foot on the goal line instead of two,” Collina said.”Since that change, their job is definitely easier than before, and it is also easier for them to respect the current law than the previous version. Then, if a law exists, referees must enforce it.”For factual decisions, the number of centimeters doesn’t matter. If a ball is over the goal line by few centimeters, a goal must be still awarded. And if a foul is committed within the penalty area by few centimeters, a penalty kick must be given.”center_img Women’s World Cup 2019: The first knockout-round matchups by the numbers Women’s World Cup goalkeepers will not be booked if they move off their line during a penalty shootout, the International Football Association Board has confirmed.The new ruling, which sees a penalty retaken if a goalkeeper does not keep two feet on the goal line, has been tested during the tournament in France. Women’s World Cup 2019: Full bracket, dates, times, TV channels, results for every matchlast_img read more

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Maria Sharapova claims in memoir Serena Williams had nasty words against her

first_img787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano Russian tennis pro Maria Sharapova’s memoir “Unstoppable: My Life So Far” gives an inside look on her personal life and career.Image: Twitter/@mariasharapovaBefore the book’s release, the 30-year-old athlete shared excerpts with People magazine. One of the highlights is her relationship with top-ranking player Serena Williams.ADVERTISEMENT However, in the locker room she heard “guttural sobs.”“I think Serena hated me for being the skinny kid who beat her, against all odds, at Wimbledon,” wrote Sharapova. “But mostly I think she hated me for hearing her cry. Not long after the tournament, I heard that she told a friend—who then told me—‘I will never lose to that little b…. again.’”She blames that moment for her dismal record against Williams, which is two wins in their 19 matches.Sharapova also opens up about testing positive for the banned substance mildronate at the Australian Open in 2016, earning her a suspension. The Russian said she needed it for health reasons and that “in Russia, millions take it, even my grandmother!”ADVERTISEMENT Vilma Santos, Luis Manzano warn public of fake account posing as her Albay to send off disaster response team to Batangas Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite LATEST STORIES MOST READ 2 nabbed in Bicol drug stings In this March 7, 2016, file photo, tennis star Maria Sharapova speaks about her failed drug test at the Australia Open during a news conference in Los Angeles.  (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)Following the controversy, Williams said she “showed a lot of courage” for being honest about the drug test.In one of the excerpts, she cites that the media called her “a cheater and a liar” and that she was “overjoyed” when her suspension was reduced from two years to 15 months. She wrote, “Before I was thinking only about how I would make my exit. Now I think only about playing.”  Niña V. Guno  /raRELATED STORIES:Drug in Sharapova doping case used by Soviet troops in 1980sTennis: Sharapova back in business, like it or notSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next WWE: Pro wrestler Ric Flair out of surgery and resting Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ Teen gunned down in Masbate End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano She and the American went head to head in 2004 when at 17, Sharapova defeated Williams in Wimbledon.At the time, Williams was still recovering from a left-knee injury she had endured since 2003.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’In her autobiography, the five-time Grand Slam winner shared that both of them “should be friends…but we are not.”She states that after the finals, Williams hugged her and said “good job.” Ai-Ai delas Alas on Jiro Manio: ‘Sana pinahalagahan niya ang naitulong ko’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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