Serena’s coach says in-match coaching would boost tennis

first_imgLights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? A few games later, Williams received another warning, this time for smashing her racket, and that second violation automatically cost her a point. Eventually, Williams called Ramos “a thief,” drawing a third violation, this one for “verbal abuse,” which cost her a game. Williams was fined a total of $17,000 the next day, including $4,000 for coaching, which is not allowed in Grand Slam matches.The WTA does allow coaching during women’s matches at other tournaments. The tour’s CEO, Steve Simon, said in the aftermath of the U.S. Open final that it “should be allowed across the sport.”The sport’s various governing bodies and Grand Slam tournaments have been looking at the issue, with some sounding more willing than others to consider permitting coaching. Wimbledon, for example, has made clear that it is “fundamentally opposed to any form of coaching during a match.”Banning coaching, Mouratoglou wrote Thursday, “almost makes it look as if it had to be hidden, or as if it was shameful.”He called the issue “symptomatic of the confrontation between two ways of thinking: The conservative, traditionalist way and the modern, progressive way.”ADVERTISEMENT Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew FILE – In this Aug. 31, 2018, file photo, Serena Williams walks on a practice court with her coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, during the third round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament, in New York. Serena Williams’ coach says in-match coaching should be allowed in tennis to help the sport’s popularity. Mouratoglou, who admitted he used banned hand signals to try to help Williams during her loss in the U.S. Open final, wrote Thursday, Oct. 18, 2018, in a posting on Twitter that legalizing coaching and making it part of the spectacle would let “viewers enjoy it as a show.”(AP Photo/Adam Hunger, File)Serena Williams’ coach says in-match coaching should be allowed in tennis to help the sport’s popularity.Patrick Mouratoglou, who admitted he used banned hand signals to try to help Williams during her loss in the U.S. Open final, wrote Thursday in a posting on Twitter that making coaching part of the spectacle would let “viewers enjoy it as a show” and “ensure that it remains pivotal in the sport.”ADVERTISEMENT Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum LATEST STORIES Mouratoglou also pointed to what he called a “hypocrisy” — players currently are getting coached at tournaments that ban coaching.And he pointed out that all sorts of individual sports — boxing, golf, cycling — permit athletes to consult someone during competition.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back Chriss“I have never understood why tennis is just about the only sport in which coaching during matches is not allowed,” Mouratoglou wrote.Quite a bit of debate about the topic of on-court coaching was sparked when chair umpire Carlos Ramos gave Williams a code violation after Mouratoglou gestured in her direction early in the second set of Naomi Osaka’s 6-2, 6-4 victory over the American for the title at Flushing Meadows last month. Besides, Mouratoglou said, “It is a very basic truth that the vast majority of tennis coaches are actually coaching on court, despite the rules. Look at how many times players look towards their boxes during a match. Some do it after every single point.”That is true.Those who argue against in-match coaching — and believe rules against it should be enforced more rigidly — say that lessens the individual, go-it-alone nature of tennis.Mouratoglou thinks part of the appeal of allowing coaching is that it would help get viewers “emotionally involved.”“You want spectators and TV viewers to have opinions about the players — and the coaches — and to know who they like and don’t like. Watching the interactions between players and coaches is a very good way of achieving this,” he wrote.Mouratoglou added: “Moreover, emotions run high when coaches talk to their players during matches. Sometimes the players don’t like to hear what their coaches are saying, but this all adds to the drama, which creates engagement on social media.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Pacman: Broner first, Mayweather later Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READlast_img read more

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Dr. Jones: ‘Right Leadership Will Motivate, Challenge Liberia for Success’

first_imgFormer Central Bank Governor Dr. J. Mills Jones has called on Liberians to welcome the train, identified as the Movement for Economic Empowerment that has already left the station and is on its way filled with hope, endurance, justice, opportunity, unity and inclusiveness.Speaking at the induction ceremony of the Cuttington University Students Union last weekend, Dr. Jones said “Change is coming and I have a simple appeal to Liberians: Get on board.”The man described as “poverty doctor,” told a large body of students “You don’t need any baggage, only a ticket of patriotism written on a paper called Liberia,” to get on board and be part of the movement.He spoke about a better tomorrow from God, “If only we are prepared to pursue it with the right leadership; a leadership that will effectively lead and motivate us, work to create an enabling environment for all Liberians and will challenge us to climb the ladder of success and prosperity.”Dr. Jones said Liberians need a leadership that will work tirelessly to ensure that Liberians have their basic needs met after 169 years as an independent nation that must have better healthcare, safe drinking water, improved access to electricity, a good educational system, and the opportunity to continuously raise their standard of living.“That’s what we mean when we talk about the new Liberia, a nation on the path of inclusive development which is within our grasp and the future of our children,” he stated.Describing 2017 as another critical hour of decision, Dr. Jones said “It is not about who steps into the shoes of the presidency; but about the type of leadership we want at the helm of the nation.”He said it matters for a country that for so long seems unable to extricate itself from the scourge of widespread poverty and underdevelopment. “Since independence we have had our share of the leadership letdown, leadership that had eyes but did not see, ears but did not hear, leadership charged with the primary responsibility to care for the people but did not care much.”Dr. Jones said around the world people are tired of the same-old politicians, and while commending United States President-elect Donald Trump, who defied conventional wisdom and got elected without the blessing of the status quo, said it is clear that “When you speak to the needs of the poor and act accordingly, the people will listen.”He explained at least five important areas that his administration, if elected, would work to complete the change he said is coming. Firstly, Dr. Jones said Liberia spends US$200m annually on the importation of rice and technology, which should change as Liberia has the climate to become self-sufficient in food.Secondly, he said his administration will ensure that over 3,000 carpenters are mobilized to produce furniture and other products from Liberian wood, including rubber wood, at reasonable cost, along with jobs and its multiplier effects of generating and saving foreign exchange for the country.Thirdly, Dr. Jones said his administration will invest in both the public and private sectors to provide low cost housing for the people, and this comes with direct and indirect job creation.Fourthly, he said research has indicated that access to finance is critical for building a domestic entrepreneurial class and while the so-called free market is unlikely to bring about the desired allocation of financing, Liberians can no longer wait; and so his administration will give priority to financial inclusion and expand access to finance for Liberian businesses, including ‘little businesses’ in rural areas.The final area of change, he said, is strengthening the National Investment Commission (NIC) by changing it into a Private Sector Development Authority that would revise investment incentives and broaden beneficiaries. “Attention should also be given to policies that will encourage Liberians in theDiaspora to invest in the country including, possibly, through Diaspora Bonds.”Dr. Jones also mentioned mobilizing domestic resources to improve the country’s financial landscape, along with investment in infrastructure and prioritizing the original mandate of the Liberia Bank for Development and Investment (LBDI).“We want to be clear that a vibrant, inclusive and diversified economy is key to stability and to creating conditions for Liberia being at peace with itself. And when it comes to the economy, Liberia needs a leadership that is prepared to hit the ground running,” Dr. Jones said, adding that “Voting is the weapon to bring the change that is in our interest and the interest of the country.” Therefore, he wants Liberians to “register to vote and then go to the polls on Election Day. Don’t vote for tribe, or county, or just for party, but for the person who has shown you that they care for you and for our country, Liberia.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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