Jamestown Man Pleads Guilty To Cocaine Charge, Faces 20 Years In Prison

first_imgBUFFALO – A Jamestown man, who is on parole, has pleaded guilty a cocaine trafficking charge and faces up to 20 years in prison and a $1 million fine.Shaquelle Coleman, 27, pleaded guilty before U.S. District Judge Richard J. Arcara to possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine. Sentencing is scheduled for Jan. 21.Coleman was arrested with another absconding parolee, Earl Stone Jr., on Jan. 23, for violating terms of parole, according to Assistant U.S. Attorney Meghan E. Leydecker, who is handling the case.Both were located in the upstairs bedroom of a residence on West 7th Street. During a search of the two defendants, law enforcement officers said they recovered $1,400 in U.S. Currency. They also recovered a quantity of suspected crack cocaine, a digital scale with white residue, and three cellular telephones from the residence. Stone was previously convicted and is awaiting sentencing.The plea is the culmination of an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, under the direction of Special Agent-in-Charge Stephen Belongia; the Jamestown Police Department, under the direction of Acting Chief Timothy Jackson; the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, under the direction of under the direction of Acting Commissioner Anthony J. Annucci; and the New York State Police, under the direction Major James Hall. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Coat drive underway in Franklin County

first_imgBrookville, In. The United Way of Franklin County is collecting winter coats for the less fortunate.Coats can be dropped off at Jim True Ford, George’s Pharmacy, First Financial Bank, Franklin County Middle School and the Brookville Elementary School. Preferred sizes are 5 through 16.last_img

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Serena’s coach says in-match coaching would boost tennis

first_imgLights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? A few games later, Williams received another warning, this time for smashing her racket, and that second violation automatically cost her a point. Eventually, Williams called Ramos “a thief,” drawing a third violation, this one for “verbal abuse,” which cost her a game. Williams was fined a total of $17,000 the next day, including $4,000 for coaching, which is not allowed in Grand Slam matches.The WTA does allow coaching during women’s matches at other tournaments. The tour’s CEO, Steve Simon, said in the aftermath of the U.S. Open final that it “should be allowed across the sport.”The sport’s various governing bodies and Grand Slam tournaments have been looking at the issue, with some sounding more willing than others to consider permitting coaching. Wimbledon, for example, has made clear that it is “fundamentally opposed to any form of coaching during a match.”Banning coaching, Mouratoglou wrote Thursday, “almost makes it look as if it had to be hidden, or as if it was shameful.”He called the issue “symptomatic of the confrontation between two ways of thinking: The conservative, traditionalist way and the modern, progressive way.”ADVERTISEMENT Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew FILE – In this Aug. 31, 2018, file photo, Serena Williams walks on a practice court with her coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, during the third round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament, in New York. Serena Williams’ coach says in-match coaching should be allowed in tennis to help the sport’s popularity. Mouratoglou, who admitted he used banned hand signals to try to help Williams during her loss in the U.S. Open final, wrote Thursday, Oct. 18, 2018, in a posting on Twitter that legalizing coaching and making it part of the spectacle would let “viewers enjoy it as a show.”(AP Photo/Adam Hunger, File)Serena Williams’ coach says in-match coaching should be allowed in tennis to help the sport’s popularity.Patrick Mouratoglou, who admitted he used banned hand signals to try to help Williams during her loss in the U.S. Open final, wrote Thursday in a posting on Twitter that making coaching part of the spectacle would let “viewers enjoy it as a show” and “ensure that it remains pivotal in the sport.”ADVERTISEMENT Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum LATEST STORIES Mouratoglou also pointed to what he called a “hypocrisy” — players currently are getting coached at tournaments that ban coaching.And he pointed out that all sorts of individual sports — boxing, golf, cycling — permit athletes to consult someone during competition.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back Chriss“I have never understood why tennis is just about the only sport in which coaching during matches is not allowed,” Mouratoglou wrote.Quite a bit of debate about the topic of on-court coaching was sparked when chair umpire Carlos Ramos gave Williams a code violation after Mouratoglou gestured in her direction early in the second set of Naomi Osaka’s 6-2, 6-4 victory over the American for the title at Flushing Meadows last month. Besides, Mouratoglou said, “It is a very basic truth that the vast majority of tennis coaches are actually coaching on court, despite the rules. Look at how many times players look towards their boxes during a match. Some do it after every single point.”That is true.Those who argue against in-match coaching — and believe rules against it should be enforced more rigidly — say that lessens the individual, go-it-alone nature of tennis.Mouratoglou thinks part of the appeal of allowing coaching is that it would help get viewers “emotionally involved.”“You want spectators and TV viewers to have opinions about the players — and the coaches — and to know who they like and don’t like. Watching the interactions between players and coaches is a very good way of achieving this,” he wrote.Mouratoglou added: “Moreover, emotions run high when coaches talk to their players during matches. Sometimes the players don’t like to hear what their coaches are saying, but this all adds to the drama, which creates engagement on social media.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Pacman: Broner first, Mayweather later Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READlast_img read more

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