Guyana ranked 2nd to Russia for most oil finds in 2019

first_img– found millions more barrels of oil than Norway, UK & USBy Jarryl BryanOil and gas companies throughout the world have discovered over seven billion barrels of oil equivalent for the year 2019, but of this amount, Guyana has the second most discoveries so far in the year.Diagram showing the extent of oil discoveries, and by which companies, for the yearThis is according to Norwegian research company Rystad Energy, which compiled a report on all the discoveries of oil around the world and came up with a list of the top 10 countries. Russia is in the lead, with over 1.5 billion barrels of oil found in its Dinkov and Nyarmeyskoye oil fields.Russia is followed closely by Guyana, where oil was found in the Liza 1 field in the Stabroek block by United States (US) based ExxonMobil and in the Orinduik block by British oil firm Tullow. These companies are not finished drilling, as further projects are being undertaken.A distant third is the middle eastern country of Cyprus. They are followed by South Africa, Malaysia, Norway, Angola and Indonesia. The United Kingdom (UK) and the US bring up the rear on the top 10 oil finds list.Commenting on the steep rise in oil drilling in the Caribbean, the report noted that in 2013, only seven offshore wells were drilled in the region. Now, the report noted, 23 new exploration wells are expected for 2019.“Rystad Energy expects the Guyana-Suriname basin will continue to occupy headlines with a few planned wells in both Guyana and Suriname. The basin is pinned as one of the most prospective, underexplored basins in the world and will definitely get a facelift from its current assigned volumes if hydrocarbons are established towards the east,” a statement from the company says.So far, Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited (EEPGL, Exxon’s local subsidiary) has made 14 oil finds in the Stabroek block over 100 miles offshore Guyana, including four for this year.Last year, the company made five discoveries. These discoveries have pushed the total estimated recoverable barrels of oil equivalent to over six billion. In addition, Exxon is moving ahead with its Liza Phase Two project, which will contain approximately 30 wells.The Liza Destiny, Guyana’s first Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel, arrived in Guyana’s waters at the end of August. The vessel will play a key role in oil production, scheduled to begin in the first quarter of next year.Meanwhile, Tullow has made at least two oil finds in its Jethro and Joe wells. On September 16, the same day that ExxonMobil announced its 14th oil find, Tullow also revealed that it had made its second oil find in just a matter of weeks – the discovery of 14 metres of oil reservoirs at the Joe well.After the find, Tullow’s Exploration Director, Angus McCoss, had noted that the discovery increases the potential in the Orinduik block. He had also alluded to the block having multibillion-barrel potential.The Orinduik oil block is just a few kilometres from Exxon’s discoveries in the Liza and Payara fields. It is under the administration of Eco Guyana and Tullow, who signed a 10-year Petroleum Prospecting Licence and Production Sharing Agreement with Guyana in 2016. French firm Total E&P Activities Petrolieres entered the fray in 2017, partnering with Eco and getting a 25 per cent share in the block.last_img read more

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Automated meter reading systems make life easy for intruders

first_img Citation: Automated meter reading systems make life easy for intruders (2012, October 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-10-automated-meter-life-easy-intruders.html An aerial view of the neighborhood where the researchers performed their eavesdropping experiments. Each blue triangle or red star represents a group of four or five meters mounted in a cluster on an exterior wall. Using an LNA and a 5 dBi omnidirectional antenna, they were able to monitor all meters in the neighborhood. Some sniffed meters may be out of the scope of this view. Credit: Ishtiaq Rouf et al. More information: Research paper: www.winlab.rutgers.edu/~grutes … ers/fp023-roufPS.pdfvia Newscientist Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—Intruders of the break-in and snooping variety have their work cut out for them by just picking up wireless signals that are broadcast by utility meters, say researchers from the University of South Carolina at Columbia, IEEE and Rutgers. As with many other technological advances that bring new pathways for criminals, advances in meters have created concerns about intrusions. Millions of analogue meters to measure water, gas and electricity consumption have been replaced by automated meter reading (AMR) in the U.S. The newer method enables devices to broadcast readings by radio every 30 seconds for utility company employees to read as they walk or drive around with a receiver. Intruders can tune into the same information, however, according to Ishtiaq Rouf and his colleagues, authors of a paper that delivers a security analysis of AMR systems. More than 40 million meters in the United States have been equipped with AMR technology over the past years. The smart meters collect energy consumption data which could reveal sensitive personal information from homes, they said. Because energy usage often drops to near zero when a house is empty, the readings could be used to identify which owners are at work or traveling. Their work shows that currently deployed AMR systems are vulnerable to spoofing attacks and privacy breaches. The research was presented earlier this week at the 19th ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security, which ran from October 16 to 18 in Raleigh, North Carolina. The AMR meters that they studied make data publicly available over unsecured wireless transmissions. “They use a basic frequency hopping wireless communication protocol and show no evidence of attempting to ensure confidentiality, integrity, and authenticity of the data,” added the research team.They picked up transmissions from AMR meters operated by companies. They said that the communication protocol can be reverse-engineered with only a few days of effort. They made use of radio equipment and information available through online tutorials. They used software radio equipment publicly available for about $1,000 (GNU Radio with the Universal Software Radio Peripheral). “We were able to both eavesdrop on messages as well as spoof messages to falsify the reading captured by a commonly used ‘walk-by’ reader,” they said. Through wireless monitoring, they harvested consumption data from 485 meters within a 300m radius region.As remedies, the authors suggested alternative schemes based on defensive jamming, which they said may be easier to deploy than upgrading meters themselves. Jamming could protect against the leakage of legacy devices and requires no modification of the deployed meters. © 2012 Phys.org Google’s PowerMeter Will Help Reduce Energy Consumption (Video)last_img read more

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