Cassava Bacteria Blight Disease (CBB)

first_imgCassava Bacterial Blight disease (CBB) is caused by a bacteria called Xanothomas axonopodis pv. manihotis.It infests the internal parts of cassava leaves and stems beginning at the tiny lesions formed in-between the leaf veins.CBB resemble small roundish water-soaked dead spots that usually start as scattered dots with angular edges. The lesions or spots later merged into larger patches completely killing the cassava leaf.MODE OF TRANSMISSION AND CONTROLThe main source of CBB is cassava plants already infested. This bacterium enters cassava plants through wounds and scratches sustained on stems and leaves. When multiply into large colonies it spreads to other cassava crops.If the crop is not destroy after root harvest, dead cassava stems and leaves with the bacterium serve as reservoir for the disease. The disease is spread naturally by raindrops which splash the bacterium from infected plants onto healthy plants. When insects for example grasshoppersfeed on disease cassava plant they become contaminated with the bacterium and spread it to healthy cassava plants as well.Farm tools that are used to cut infected cassava plants should be cleaned after use to prevent the bacterium spreading to other plants.All plants suspected of the CBB should be rogued and completely destroyed.SYMPTOMSVisible signs of CBB start from the leaf blade and migrate toward the petiole making the leaves brownish when severed. Othersigns of CBB includes the appearance of brown gum stains on the leafs, petioles and stems of infested cassava plants.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Former Observer Bassa Correspondent is Dead

first_imgA former Grand Bassa County correspondent of the Daily Observer newspaper, John Gibson has died in the port city of Buchanan on June 8.He was 74.Gibson worked for the Liberia News Agency (LINA), Mercy Corps, National Bank of Liberia, now Central Bank of Liberia (CBL) and a correspondent of Talking Drum Studio (TDS).According to Lee P. Gibson, son of the deceased, John Gibson graduated from the St. John’s Episcopal School in Bassa with several certificates and diplomas from vocational institutions around the country.The late Gibson was born on February 24, 1941. She is survived by his wife, Sunday-May Gibson and 15 children.The children include: Lee P. Gibson, James M. Gibson, Janjay Gibson (USA), Junior Gibson, Hawa Gibson, Naytay Gibson, Margba Gibson (USA), Almilton Gibson, Martee Gibson, Narsah Gibson, Paygar Gibson and Brumskine Gibson.Lee P. Gibson told the Daily Observer yesterday that his father worked for a few years with the Observer as a correspondent and did not have any other job before his death. “My father died from high blood pressure, which he suffered from for the last 2 years,” Lee said.The body of John Gibson body is currently at the Bedell Funeral home in Buchanan. Lee said his late father spent his life in Montserrado and Grand Bassa counties and was a member of St. Mary Central Church of Buchanan, Grand Bassa County.“My father played a major role in the church. The wake keeping will be held on Thursday, June 18 and the funeral will take place on Friday,” Lee explained.The late John Gibson was also a member of the Press Union of Liberia (PUL). Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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