German government outlines $10 billion plan to boost green hydrogen

first_imgGerman government outlines $10 billion plan to boost green hydrogen FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Associated Press:The German government agreed Wednesday on a long-term strategy for increasing production and use of hydrogen as part of a plan to cut the country’s greenhouse gas emissions.While hydrogen is currently produced almost exclusively from fossil fuels, the government wants to encourage its production from excess electricity generated by renewable energy sources.Experts say this so-called green hydrogen could help smooth out the problem of solar and wind power’s fluctuating supply, and replace fossil fuels in industrial processes that require high temperatures such as steel making.The government plans to invest 9 billion euros ($10.2 billion) to promote hydrogen production and use, including 2 billion euros that will go toward projects in developing countries such as Morocco.It set a goal of building hydrogen production facilities in Germany with a capacity of up to five gigawatts by 2030.Germany’s industry lobby group BDI welcomed the government decision. “Only with hydrogen at competitive prices, from domestic sources and imports, can the goal of climate neutrality by 2050 be reached,” said BDI deputy head Holger Loesch.[Frank Jordans]More: German government agrees on national hydrogen strategylast_img read more

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Japan businesses reopen as govt eyes end to emergency measures in some regions

first_imgTopics : As Japan prepares to ease coronavirus restrictions in some parts of the country, a growing number of the country’s businesses are planning to resume operations despite concerns that isolation guidelines were being lifted too early.After a month-long shutdown brought economic activity to a grinding halt, Economy Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura said on Friday that the government was looking at ways to bring some parts of the country out of lockdown measures as the rate of infections has slowed in several outlying regions.”The number of new infections of the coronavirus is significantly falling,” he told reporters. “There are more prefectures with no new coronavirus cases, so lifting the state of emergency is within sight.” Japan this week extended its nationwide state of emergency but said it would reassess the situation on May 14 and possibly lift the measures earlier for some prefectures.Too early?So far, 27 of Japan’s 47 prefectures have lifted some or all requests for residents to remain indoors as much as possible, or are planning to do so in the coming days.About 15,500 coronavirus infections and 590 deaths have been confirmed in the country as of Friday.Businesses were permitted to reopen in Iwate Prefecture in the country’s northeast, which has yet to report any infections, but some local shop owners were wary of resuming normal operations.”It feels like it’s too early to reopen. People have done a good job of keeping infections in the prefecture at zero,” said Mana Takahashi, owner of Clammbon cafe in Morioka City in the prefecture, who has been relying on coffee bean sales for revenue since closing the cafe’s dining area in April.”It would be unfortunate for an infection to occur just as rules are being loosened,” she added, adding that the streets outside her shop have remained largely empty even after the shutdown request was lifted.Across town, sports clubs and karaoke bars were opening for the first time in weeks.”We’ve had a few groups of students, and also single customers have come in so far,” said an employee at a karaoke bar shortly after it reopened at noon on Friday, speaking on condition of anonymity as he was not permitted to speak with media. “We’re expecting our regulars back tonight.”center_img After lockdown measures led to a record contraction of Japan’s services sector last month, businesses including cafes, bars and sports clubs have been resuming operations even as the coronavirus epidemic has sapped demand.Casual clothing chain Uniqlo reopened 48 stores in Japan on Thursday, including several large stores in Tokyo and Osaka, said its owner, Fast Retailing, while Aeon Co, the region’s biggest supermarket operator, said it was reopening its Aeon Mall shopping centers.A queue of more than 100 people snaked in front of Tokyo’s famed Kinokuniya book store in the Shinjuku district when it reopened on Thursday for the first time in three weeks, local media reported, with most customers waiting to purchase the latest manual for the video game “Animal Crossing.”But Tokyo Disneyland operator Oriental Land on Friday said that the park, one of the country’s biggest tourist attractions, would remain closed through May amid the state of emergency in the city and neighboring Chiba Prefecture.last_img read more

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Coat drive underway in Franklin County

first_imgBrookville, In. The United Way of Franklin County is collecting winter coats for the less fortunate.Coats can be dropped off at Jim True Ford, George’s Pharmacy, First Financial Bank, Franklin County Middle School and the Brookville Elementary School. Preferred sizes are 5 through 16.last_img

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Homicides in Chicago up 51% as Lightfoot Feuds with Trump

first_imgThe war of words between Mayor Lightfoot and President Trump continues over violence in Chicago. Lightfoot blasted Trump yesterday for blaming local leaders for the city’s violent crime. Lightfoot said that Trump is just trying to shift the narrative from his disastrous handling of the coronavirus to violence in Democrat-run cities.https://www.850wftl.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/15-shot-Chicago-funeral.mp3Meanwhile 15 mourners were shot at a funeral Tuesday night.Compared with this time in 2019, shootings in the city are up 47%, going to 1,637 now from 1,110 in 2019, according to Chicago Police Department data.Homicides have increased by 51%, spiking to 414 as of Sunday from 275 at this time in 2019.The Tuesday night shooting was Chicago’s worst in recent years.The mayor added that Trump has been on a campaign against Democratic mayors across the country.The president criticized Chicago’s local leadership while announcing his deployment of federal agents to the Windy City.At a later news conference, Trump called Chicago a disaster and said Lightfoot was making a big mistake by telling the federal government to stay out of the city.last_img read more

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