a month agoWatford boss Quique Sanchez Flores: The result today damages me a lot

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Watford boss Quique Sanchez Flores: The result today damages me a lotby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveWatford boss Quique Sanchez Flores fears for his players after their 8-0 thrashing by Manchester City.He apologised numerous times to the club’s supporters following the thumping loss, but claims that the nature of the performance makes his position as coach more difficult.”We know how tough is the Premier League and every single match,” said Sanchez Flores.”When we accepted the invitation of the club to come here, to lead the team, we knew we were going to play against Arsenal and we were going to play against Manchester City.”It’s not about the margin you have when you come or not. Pep said yesterday in his press conference we know it’s not about you as a coach, it’s about the results.”So, of course, the result today it damages a lot myself, but one week ago, the results supported me. “We can see more than one week, we can see longer than one next match. It’s like this, so we need to live with this kind of consequence. It’s like this, it’s our work.”First we have to say sorry to the fans because they came to the stadium waiting for a good performance from the team and it was very difficult to be on the pitch today.”After 30 seconds we realised it would be very tough and then after 15 minutes it was impossible to play like this.” last_img read more

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Gov’t Awaits Environmental Study on Goat Islands

first_imgStory Highlights CHEC has indicated Goat Islands as its first choice for a trans-shipment port Minister of Transport, Works and Housing, Dr. the Hon. Omar Davies, said that the Government would not be making any decisions on the development of Goat Islands until a study commissioned by the Port Authority of Jamaica on the environmental impact is completed and assessed.CHEC has indicated Goat Islands as its first choice for the proposed development of the trans-shipment port and economic zone under the Global Logistics Hub Initiative.Addressing Jamaica House press briefing at the Office of the Prime Minister on September 11, Dr. Davies said the proposed development would make Goat Islands the most significant project executed under the logistics hub.“Depending on…receipt of a formal proposal and a final decision, this would perhaps be the most significant initiative because you would have both a trans-shipment port as well as an economic zone,” the Minister said.The proposed investment of approximately US$1.5 billion by China Harbour Engineering Company (CHEC) would represent a key development milestone for Jamaica and could have a significant positive impact on the country’s development agenda.The study is expected to be completed by the end of September.Through the Global Logistics Hub Initiative, the Government intends to take advantage of the anticipated increase in maritime activities from the expansion of the Panama Canal, scheduled to be completed in 2016.The aim is to create a range of special economic zones throughout Jamaica, including industrial parks, urban business districts, and technology parks. Multi-national companies will be invited to set up operations to provide value-added activities geared towards the international community.Other key elements of the initiative include development of the Caymanas Economic Zone; dredging of the Kingston Harbour; establishing a Dry Dock facility at Jackson Bay, Clarendon; establishing a trans-shipment commodity port facility near Yallahs, St. Thomas; and developing an air cargo and passenger facility at Vernamfield, in Clarendon. The proposed investment is approximately US$1.5 billion GOJ would not be making any decisions on Goat Islands until the study is completelast_img read more

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Flimsy fences ferocious dogs Canadas top pot expert on weeds path to

first_imgTORONTO – Even though Ernest Small was the biggest legal grower of legal marijuana in North America back in the 1970s and is the federal government’s foremost pot expert, the Canadian researcher is in disbelief that the country is on the cusp of legalizing the drug’s recreational use.The principal research scientist for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, who was recently named to the Order of Canada last week for his vast body of work, says the atmosphere around marijuana in government and law enforcement circles was “repressive and conservative” for decades.“I would never have predicted that we would come to this. … There was not the slightest suggestion that one day, marijuana could be a legal commodity,” he said in an interview. “It just didn’t seem possible.”Now, there are more than 80 licensed producers of cannabis in the country, all of whom are ramping up production to be ready for the July 2018 deadline for the legalization of recreational marijuana across the country, while pot company stocks have been on fire for months.But looking back, Small had to aggressively plead his case with the government to allow him to begin researching weed, when he joined as a researcher in 1969.At the time, the now 77-year-old had just finished his doctorate in plant evolution from the University of California. Before landing in the Golden State, he said he had “no idea what drugs were, no idea what hippies were.”“It was just a total culture shock. And nevertheless, I did become quite interested in the cannabis plant because that was the thing that students, and even my professors were doing. And I was interested as a botanist in studying it as a plant.”Small said he convinced the government to allow him to study what was “basically verboten” by focusing on pot’s risks and how research could help law enforcement depress its use. He was eventually able to convince Health Canada to give him the green light, he said.The government also wanted, at the time, a standard supply of marijuana for experimental purposes. And in turn, Small was involved in establishing a two-acre pot crop at the Central Experimental Farm in Ottawa, at Health Canada’s request.“I actually grew several tonnes of marijuana, and at that time more legal cannabis anybody in the world, at least in North America,” Small said.However, the outdoor plot only lasted for one summer in 1971, after being “raided frequently.”Small describes a “very flimsy fence” around the plot, as well as guards and “very ferocious dogs” on hand to protect it.“It very quickly became apparent that teenagers were doing a lot of the raiding. And we could not expose them to these dogs, so the dogs were kept chained up, ” he said. “We didn’t have searchlights… so the whole plot was a sitting duck.”After one summer, the operation was later moved indoors until roughly 1980, when the department of Agriculture decided it didn’t want to grow cannabis on the premises, he said.Subsequently, Small said he grew legal cannabis in association with the private sector, on private land.Small was also closely involved in selecting the strain of marijuana that is now the basis of all licensed medical marijuana in Canada.“It was a reasonable strain, easily producing 12 per cent THC,” he said.Today, Small noted, there are stronger strains with different balances of cannabinoids — chemical compounds secreted by cannabis flowers which give pot its medical and recreational properties.Still, Small believes that cannabis is now “on the verge of huge changes that are agriculturally significant, in terms of the productivity of this plant.”While most other crops have undergone the so-called Green Revolution, which has boosted agricultural production, cannabis has been left behind, he said.“The green revolution phase has totally been overlooked, because, of course, it’s been illegal most of the last century,” he said. “We are standing on the verge of huge changes that are agriculturally significant in terms of the productivity of this plant. It’s just a mind-boggling situation. There is no other crop but cannabis that is in this remarkable situation.”When asked whether his research, or recreation, has ever involved dabbling in pot himself, Small responded, “Hell, no.”He said if there is even the slightest odour of cannabis at a party, he immediately leaves. It’s an approach he intends to keep up with, even after July 2018.“I’m as pure as the driven snow,” Small said, adding that he does not drink alcohol or coffee either. “The simple fact is I’m entrusted with an enormous responsibility. And I am not going to, and have never, considered compromising that.”last_img read more

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Ohio State womens track and fields Khadevis Robinson ready for challenge

No current or former Ohio State track and field athletes qualified for the 2012 London Olympics, but the Buckeyes’ newest track and field coach did.Khadevis Robinson, who competed in the 800-meter run in London and also at the 2004 Athens Games, was announced as an assistant coach for OSU women’s track and field on Aug. 30. Robinson will lead the cross-country program and coach the track and field team’s distance runners.Before accepting the OSU position, Robinson had served in the same coaching capacity at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas for the men’s and women’s teams since January 2011. Under his guidance, junior Kelsey Williamson earned indoor and outdoor 800 meter Mountain West Conference indoor track and field championship titles, while senior Brett Zorich qualified for the NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships in the same event.OSU women’s track and field coach Karen Dennis said she was impressed by what Robinson achieved in his time at UNLV, and believes it will translate to success at OSU.“When I looked at what Khadevis had done at UNLV, he was really getting some solid performances out of some women who I didn’t think had the talent,” Dennis said. “I didn’t think they had the same talent and depth that we have. I thought we have good, better talent, but we just weren’t getting the performances.”Robinson said he is excited for his new opportunity.“I’ve coached at almost every level … but I hadn’t coached at a big university,” Robinson said. “I like challenges and this will be a great challenge for me.”Robinson’s accomplishments as a professional athlete include four U.S. indoor titles and four U.S. outdoor championships in the 800 meter.A graduate of Texas Christian University, Robinson was also the 1998 NCAA champion in the 800 meter. He failed to qualify out of the opening heats of the 800 meter in both of his trips to the Olympics, but at 36 years old, he was the oldest competitor in the event in London.Robinson explained how his success as a professional athlete on the track has helped him achieve success coaching.“What it comes down to is really being able to relate to the athletes,” Robinson said. “So if they’re going through something, you can say, ‘Well, I know how you feel because I’ve gone through this also.’”Dennis said that while Robinson’s athletic success increased his appeal as a candidate for the job, there were other factors as well.“Well, I think that any time you’ve got somebody that’s coming in from the Olympics, sure they’re attractive,” Dennis said. “But at the same time, that wasn’t the sole reason. I would’ve still considered him as a strong candidate because I’m looking for somebody that showed results. I felt like he’s a good motivator, he’s very articulate …. and I felt like that’s what our kids needed.”Dennis said there were “probably 80 applicants,” and about 30 of them were what she would consider “strong, qualified applicants.”But Robinson stood out.“When it came to interviewing and bringing people on campus, he just proved himself. He just moved to the top of the pack,” Dennis said.An athletic spokesman stated that Robinson’s annual salary is $60,000.An Olympic runner on the track and a Division I coach on the sidelines, Robinson has had to learn how to balance two challenging jobs. He described the balance as “very, very, very, very, very difficult.”“If I was just running and not trying to be top 10 in the world, or making the Olympic team, it wouldn’t be as difficult because competing at the highest level is extremely difficult,” Robinson said. “On the other hand, some of the same things I tell my athletes, I can hear myself saying it to myself when I’m competing. So it gives me accountability, because when I tell some of the athletes I’m coaching to be A, B, C and D, then it makes me be accountable to doing A, B, C and D when I’m competing also.”But Robinson said coaching is a way for him to fulfill what he believes to be his purpose in life.“I think everything in life has a purpose,” Robinson said. “I found out my purpose is to inspire, motivate and help others. That’s my purpose in life. It just so happened that God blessed me as an athlete to be able to get my message out.” read more

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SAINTS have been awarded Category 1 Academy status

first_imgSAINTS have been awarded Category 1 Academy status following a detailed assessment of their performance and structure.The club has been rated as ‘outstanding’ in recognition of the excellence of their junior development programmes from age 12 upwards.Under the accreditation process, clubs are assessed in three key areas:Quality of leadership and management – the strategy and vision of the Academy and progress made;How well Academies meet the needs of players – the welfare, education and safeguarding that is in place;Delivery of player development system – the approaches used to optimise the development of players through to first grade and England. Saints joined Hull FC, Leeds Rhinos, Warrington Wolves, Widnes Vikings and Wigan Warriors in being rated as outstanding.Five other clubs – Bradford Bulls, Huddersfield Giants, Hull Kingston Rovers, Wakefield Trinity Wildcats and Catalans Dragons – were rated as ‘good’ after making significant improvements over the last 12 months.Castleford Tigers were rated as ‘requires improvement’ but the assessment recognised the strides the club has made since last year.London Broncos and Salford Red Devils did not reach the required standards for Category 1 standard.Saints Academy has been rated as outstanding every year since the grading process began.last_img read more

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Uber Plans to Fight 13 Million Fine in France

first_img Uber Plans to Fight $1.3 Million Fine in France Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business 3 min read Legal Image credit: Shutterstock Add to Queue –shares David Meyercenter_img Next Article Uber’s entertaining week in France continues with a €1.2 million ($1.3 million) fine from a Paris court for making “ambiguous” recommendations to its drivers. The U.S. firm is appealing, claiming the underlying law is invalid.The Wednesday fine stemmed from a suit lodged by a national taxi union back at the end of 2014, over Uber’s alleged contravention of a law from that year that banned several Uber-like practices.One of those rules states that drivers from such services cannot wait on a public road between fares, but must instead return to a parking area until their next pre-booked appointment begins. The idea is to stop them from behaving like, well, taxis.The taxi union complained that Uber’s driver-training videos were less than explicit about this point, and the Paris commercial court agreed that the videos encouraged drivers to go to areas with high demand, and to accept fares from people even when they did not fall into the legally mandated scenario.The court told Uber to cut it out, but the union noticed that some of the training videos stayed up on YouTube during the first quarter of 2015. Hence the fine, which goes to the union, and which Uber is appealing along with the original ruling.Uber’s take on this is that the underlying law itself is null and void, as it does not comply with European legislation. The firm points out that the French government failed to notify the European Commission about the so-called Thévenoud law, which also bans private-hire drivers from using software to find clients, before passing it.This matters because Uber claims to be an “information-society service” rather than a taxi firm, and EU countries are supposed to tell the Commission about any new laws targeting information-society services before putting them into practice.“The merits of the case on which today’s decision was based are already under appeal. Clearly we will appeal this particular outcome too. There is a question mark over the very law itself, which the European Commission is investigating,” Uber said.Uber’s service was one of the subjects of protests this week in Paris, with taxi drivers blocking traffic and burning tires in outrage over the practices of the firm and others like it. They say the authorities have not properly enforced the Thévenoud law and their revenues have recently fallen by 20-40% — which is particularly tough when they have to pay around €200,000 for a license to operate a taxi and their new-fangled rivals do not.France’s constitutional court has already ruled that drivers can work for both traditional cab companies and services such as Uber, and Uber said last week that it wants to open up its platform to taxi drivers. A taxi syndicate representative told The Verge this was a “provocation.” This story originally appeared on Fortune Magazine Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. January 28, 2016 Register Now »last_img read more

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Nintendos Market Cap Doubles to 42 Billion Since Pokemon GO Launch

first_img 2 min read Enroll Now for $5 Shares of Japan’s Nintendo Co. soared another 14 percent on Tuesday, more than doubling the firm’s market capitalization to 4.5 trillion yen ($42.5 billion) in just seven sessions since the mobile game Pokemon GO was launched in the United States.The phenomenal success of Pokemon GO — now available in 35 countries, the majority in Europe, and most recently in Canada — has triggered massive buying in Nintendo shares, surprising even some seasoned market players.”I’ve never seen the trend of such a big company’s shares changing so quickly in such a short period of time,” said Takashi Oba, senior strategist at Okasan Securities.Nintendo shares ended Tuesday up 14.4 percent at 31,770 yen, bringing its gains to more than 100 percent since the launch of the game on July 6.Turnover in Nintendo shares hit 703.6 billion yen, surpassing the record for trading turnover in individual shares it set on Friday, of 476 billion yen.Trading in Nintendo shares roughly accounted for a quarter of the entire trading on the Tokyo Stock Exchange’s main board.The success of Pokemon GO, unforeseen even by its creators, has boosted hopes that Nintendo could capitalize on a line-up of popular characters ranging from Zelda to Super Mario to strengthen its new foray into augmented reality.”Virtual reality and augmented reality have been a focus of the market but hardly anyone was expecting Nintendo in this area. Suddenly Nintendo has become an AR-related stock,” said a fund manager at a Japanese asset management firm, who declined to be named as he is not allowed to discuss individual shares.The fund manager said the big gains were justifiable considering the likely boost to Nintendo’s bottom line.”Under my rough estimate, the sales from Pokemon GO and upcoming related gadgets will boost net profits by 50 billion yen. Based on that assumption, Nintendo is traded at 30 times profits, which is not unreasonable,” he said.The popularity of Pokemon GO is producing an unexpected boom in some shares that have a scant link to the game.Shares in First Baking Co., a bakery firm with annual sales of 25 billion yen, saw its shares rise 18 percent on Tuesday as the firm sells “Pokemon Bread” among other breads wrapped with character-decorated bags.(Additional reporting by Daiki Iga; Editing by Himani Sarkar) Add to Queue Reuters This story originally appeared on Reuters Next Article July 19, 2016center_img Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Image credit: Reuters | Chris Helgren 55shares Nintendo Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Nintendo’s Market Cap Doubles to $42 Billion Since Pokemon GO Launchlast_img read more

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Jeff Bezos Unveils New Rocket to Compete With SpaceX

first_img Apply Now » Jeff Bezos on Monday unveiled a heavy-lift reusable rocket expected to compete against Elon Musk’s SpaceX and other companies for commercial satellite launches before the end of the decade.Bezos’ Kent, Washington-based Blue Origin space company is designing two versions of the rocket, named New Glenn, a nod to John Glenn, the first American to orbit Earth and the last surviving member of NASA’s original Mercury Seven astronauts.“New Glenn is designed to launch commercial satellites and to fly humans into space,” Bezos, also the founder and chief executive of Amazon.com Inc., said in a statement emailed to Reuters on Monday.Both versions of New Glenn will use a first stage powered by seven methane-burning BE-4 engines. The company is building a launch site and test facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, and a rocket manufacturing plant at NASA’s adjacent Kennedy Space Center.Blue Origin also intends to sell the BE-4 to United Launch Alliance for its new Vulcan rocket. ULA is a partnership of Lockheed Martin Corp. and Boeing Co.Blue Origin intends to fly New Glenn’s first stage back to a landing pad so it can be refurbished and reflown, an approach that fellow tech billionaire entrepreneur Musk is taking with his Falcon rockets. SpaceX so far has successfully landed rockets six times, twice on the ground and four times on a platform floating in the ocean.SpaceX had expected to try a seventh landing on Sept. 3, but its rocket was destroyed during a routine prelaunch test two days before liftoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.The cause of the accident, which destroyed a $200 million Space Communication Ltd. satellite, is under investigation.Blue Origin has been testing a smaller, reusable rocket and spaceship called New Shepard, which is intended to fly paying passengers to an altitude of about 62 miles (100 km) so they can experience a few minutes of microgravity and see the limb of Earth set against the blackness of space.Blue Origin has not yet started selling tickets for rides. If test flights continue as expected, Blue Origin pilots could begin flying next year, with paying passengers to follow in 2018, Bezos told Reuters during an interview earlier this year.(Reporting by Irene Klotz; Editing by Phil Berlowitz) September 12, 2016 This story originally appeared on Reuters Space Travel 2 min read Image credit: Reuters | Mike Blake Jeff Bezos Reuters center_img 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Next Article 55shares Add to Queue The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Jeff Bezos Unveils New Rocket to Compete With SpaceX Bezos’s Kent, Wash.-based Blue Origin space company is designing two versions of the rocket, named New Glenn, a nod to John Glenn.last_img read more

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Cocktail of chemicals in the mother inhibits child growth

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Feb 25 2019For the first time, researchers have shown that a combination of perfluorinated substances in the mother significantly inhibits child growth.They make many everyday things easier, such as keeping children’s feet dry in waterproofed boots, stopping the meat balls sticking to the frying pan and making it easier to clean the carpet.But these environmental chemicals, the perfluorinated substances, have a wide range of damaging effects, with the most recent turning out to be reduced growth in fetuses.This is shown by a new study in which researchers from Aarhus University have examined the cocktail effect of the chemicals, leading to findings which are both significant and alarming according to Professor Eva Cecilie Bonefeld-Joergensen from the Department of Public Health.”The perfluorinated substances can mimic the hormone estrogen and can therefore disrupt the body’s natural hormonal processes including the development of the fetus. We can see that the complex mix of perfluorinated substances in the mother impairs fetal growth and length,” she says.Researchers had previously only studied the individual impact of the substances on the fetus, and these results had not been entirely clear-cut.Eva Cecilie Bonefeld-Joergensen and her research colleagues have developed a new method for extracting and isolating the contents of the substances from the blood and then subsequently determining the combined endocrine disrupting effect of the substances – popularly called the cocktail effect – on the development of the fetus.”When it comes to the overall effect, the calculation is not 1+1=2, but rather 1+1=3. Low birth weight can lead to a number of diseases later in life, but we still lack specific knowledge about how the children who are exposed to the substances subsequently develop,” says Bonefeld-Joergensen of the results which have been published in the scientific journal Environmental Health Perspectives.Related StoriesPuzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeShe is currently waiting for an answer to an application for a foundation grant to carry out the necessary follow-up studies on the ongoing development of these children.The researchers have examined blood samples from 702 pregnant Danish women who were registered in the database “Aarhus Children’s Biobank”. Such thorough studies of the concentration of perfluorinated substances and their biological effect in pregnant woman have not been done previously, but the study is nevertheless in line with previous research in the area. The substances have furthermore been associated with a range of issues including breast cancer, fertility problems, ADHD, the risk of asthma, a weakened immune system and the reduced effect of vaccines.The harmful environmental chemicals accumulate in the body and are not easily degradable. They are fat and water repellent and are found in our food, in the air we breathe, in dust and water and in a wide range of everyday products such as e.g. waterproof clothing, food packaging, furniture textiles and make-up. Only a few of the almost one thousand different perfluorinated substances are presently regulated by law, and there is no product labeling requirement.”As a consumer, you have to ask in the store. Products with these toxic substances are popular, but we pay the price with our children’s and our own health if we don’t avoid these products,” says the researcher.The area is regulated by the EU, but the Minister for Environment and Food, Jakob Ellemann-Jensen (the Danish Liberal Party), has recently announced that he will explore the possibility of a national ban on the substances in cardboard and paper for food packaging.The new study is part of Aarhus University’s Fetotox project, which studies the impact of perfluorinated substances on women and children. Source:http://www.au.dk/last_img read more

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Premature babies also have protective antiviral antibodies

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 18 2019Even premature babies carry anti-viral antibodies transferred from the mother, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a paper on maternal antibodies in newborns, published in the journal Nature Medicine. The results should change our approach to infection sensitivity in newborns, they say.Antibodies are transferred from the mother’s blood to the fetus that give the newborn passive defence against infection. Since most of this process takes place during the third trimester of the pregnancy, doctors have regarded very premature babies as being unprotected by such maternal antibodies.However, now that the total repertoire of maternal anti-viral antibodies has been analyzed in neonates by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, another picture is emerging.”We saw that babies born as early as in week 24 also have maternal antibodies, which surprised us,” says corresponding author Dr Petter Brodin, physician and researcher at the Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab) and the Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet.The study comprised 78 mother-child pairs. 32 of the babies were very premature (born before week 30) and 46 were full-term. The analysis show that the repertoire of maternal antibodies was the same in both groups.”I hope that this makes us question some preconceived ideas about the neonate immune system and infection sensitivity so that we can take even better care of newborns,” says Dr Brodin. “Premature babies can be especially sensitive to infection, but that is not because they lack maternal antibodies. We should concentrate more on other possible causes, maybe like their having underdeveloped lung function or weaker skin barriers.”Related StoriesNew research offers hints to origins of systemic lupus erythematosusNovel vaccine against bee sting allergy successfully testedBio-Rad launches new isotype-specific secondary antibodiesThe study was conducted using a newly developed method for simultaneously analysing the presence of antibodies against all the viruses that can infect humans (with the exception of the Zika virus, which was identified later). The method is developed by US researchers and is based on a so-called bacteriophage display, a technique awarded with the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.Briefly, it is based on the ability to make viral particles called bacteriophages display a specific surface protein. In this case, all in all the bacteriophage library displayed over 93,000 different peptides, short-chain proteins, from over 206 species of virus and over 1 000 different strains. The library is mixed with the blood plasma to be tested. Any antibodies in the plasma sample bind with the bacteriophages and can then be detected by the researchers.The analysis was conducted on samples taken at birth and during the newborns’ first, fourth and twelfth week. The researchers found that the protection offered by the antibodies lasted different durations depending on the virus. This can suggest that their transfer during the fetal stage is regulated rather than random, a possibility the group is now examining further.The study also shows which parts of the virus proteins that antibodies target, information that is important in the development of vaccines, notes Dr Brodin.”If all maternal antibodies target a specific part of a virus protein, that is important to know because then it is that part a vaccine should be based on,” he says. “I hope that our results can be used by others to develop better vaccines, such as against the RS virus that causes so much distress for babies every winter.” Source:https://ki.se/en/research/protective-antibodies-also-found-in-premature-babieslast_img read more

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Novel models and strategies for TB detection elimination and care

first_imgCredit: GDJ, Pixabay and NIAID, FlickrAn estimated 10 million people developed tuberculosis (TB) and 1.6 million died of TB globally in 2017, making it the number one cause of death from a single infectious agent. Last year the United Nations held a High Level Meeting on TB, where heads of state pledged to eliminate the disease by 2030.The Special Issue opens with publication of two original research articles:In the first article, Radojka M. Savic, of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues, develop a model for estimating the distribution of TB drugs in patients’ lung lesions. They used data on 329 plasma- and 1,362 tissue-specific drug concentrations from 9 distinct lung lesion types obtained from 15 patients (10 men, 5 women) undergoing lung resection surgery, to develop and evaluate a site-of-action mechanistic pharmacokinetic model for 7 major TB drugs (rifampin [RIF], isoniazid [INH], linezolid [LZD], moxifloxacin [MFX], clofazimine[CFZ], pyrazinamide [PZA], and kanamycin [KAN]). The researchers found that patients receiving standard doses of RIF and INH, who are at the lower range of exposure distribution, spent substantial periods (>12 h/d) below effective concentrations in hard-to-treat lesions, such as caseous lesions and cavities. Standard doses of INH (300 mg) and KAN (1,000 mg) did not reach therapeutic thresholds in most lesions for a majority of the patient population. The investigators also found that the majority of TB drugs showed poor penetration into the cavitary lesions, leading to inadequate drug levels at the site of disease and increased risk of developing drug resistance. The authors note that this was a small group of patients from a unique population of TB patients who failed treatment and underwent lung resection surgery. Still, the authors note that the finding that TB drugs do not penetrate equally in different tissues suggests that a patient-focused approach to optimize drug regimen to the disease extent, lesion type, and individual drug-susceptibility profiles may eventually be useful to guide selection of tailored drug regimens with improved outcomes. They provide a web-based tool to further explore this model and results at http://saviclab.org/tb-lesion/.Related StoriesTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyIn the second article, Ankur Gupta-Wright, of London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and colleagues develop a clinical risk score for identifying HIV-positive patients diagnosed with TB with an increased chance of dying within 2 months. The risk score includes 6 factors that can be measured upon hospital admission, including a urine TB diagnostic test to detect the protein lipoarabinomannan [LAM], age, sex, previous experience on antiretroviral treatment, anaemia, and ability to walk unaided. The score was derived in a cohort of 315 patients from the STAMP TB screening trial in Malawi and South Africa, and externally validated in 644 patients from 2 other studies done in South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, and Kenya. For patients identified by the score as high-risk, the odds of dying within 2 months were about 5 times greater (odds ratio 5.3, 95% confidence interval 2.2–9.5) compared to patients classified as low-risk in the validation cohort. The authors note that this risk score depends on access to urine LAM testing, does not measure all potential predictors of mortality (e.g., TB drug resistance), and further validation in larger and diverse cohorts is necessary. However, this risk score may be able to identify patients who could benefit from enhanced clinical care, follow-up, and/or adjunctive interventions.In addition to the research articles this week, the Special Issue includes a blog on Speaking of Medicine featuring the stories of six survivors of TB, discussing their experiences with different aspects of the TB care cascade, and how it led them to advocate at a local and global level to improve TB care.The Special Issue will continue with further research and discussion articles appearing over the next several weeks. Apr 8 2019This week, publication of a special issue on tuberculosis (TB) begins in PLOS Medicine, advised by guest editors Richard Chaisson of Johns Hopkins University, Claudia Denkinger of the University of Heidelberg, and Mark Hatherill of the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Institute. Source:https://www.plos.orglast_img read more

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Muted mention of health belies needs of the critical sectorMuted mention of

first_imgThe deaths of children due to encephalitis in Bihar’s Muzzafarpur and the nationwide doctors’ strike has sparked concerns over state of healthcare in the country.The crisis has presented a strong case for the long-pending increase in the government’s healthcare spends.But Budget 2019 did not go down that road. The sparse mention of health in the Budget speech came as a surprise for healthcare workers, and representatives of the pharmaceutical and medical device industry — also a vital part of the healthcare landscape. Also, the Centre’s largely remained silent on flagship Ayushman Bharat programme that aimed to provide healthcare coverage to those with limited economic means.The government’s policy statement talks of spending 2.5 per cent of the GDP by 2025. But the present spending, though higher, is nowhere close to this target, said Sakthivel Selvaraj , health economist with the Public Health Foundation of India.And though the Centre may treat this Budget as “work in progress” on their larger vision, Ayushman Bharat in particular needed to see a larger financial commitment given its ambition to provide ₹5 lakh insurance to 10 crore families annually. The allocation at ₹6,400 crore falls short of the fund required for the programme, he added.“It is appalling that since last three years , it is the first budget with zero mention of healthcare, not even higher allocation for Ayushman Bharat,” said Rajiv Nath with the Association for Indian Medical Device Industry. Nath also expressed dismay over not finding measures to “stem the tsunami of (medical device) imports” that has increased by 24 per cent at ₹38,800 crore and is “crushing Indian manufacturing system”.Pharma industryPharmaceutical industry, too, remained disappointed due tothe absence of strong measures to support them. Besides the expectation on tax sops and support for small and medium enterprises, the pharmaceutical industry was hoping for some direction on bulk drugs and Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients, which are used to make medicines. Presently, there is huge dependence on China for APIs. July 05, 2019 SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTS strike Bihar COMMENT SHARE Published onlast_img read more

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