Africa’s largest solar-plus-wind-plus-storage project proposed in Kenya

first_imgAfrica’s largest solar-plus-wind-plus-storage project proposed in Kenya FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Tech:Japanese developer Eurus Energy and Australian-headquartered wind developer Windlab have signed a deal with Kenyan authorities to develop an 80MW solar-plus-wind-plus-storage facility in central Kenya. The Meru County Energy Park is being hailed as “Africa’s first large-scale hybrid wind, solar PV and battery project.”According to news reports in The Standard and ESI-Africa, the US$150 million plant will comprise 20 wind turbines and 40,000 solar panels. The facility will be a public-private partnership, and the Meru County government will own part of the project once it is operational. Construction is due to start in 2021.A memorandum of understanding (MoU) was signed between Windlab East Africa, Eurus Energy, the Kenya Investment Authority and Meru County government on Thursday 29 August at the Tokyo International Conference on African Development.In June, a consortium of government and development financiers, including the World Bank and Dutch development institution SNV, unveiled a US$47 million pot for providers of off-grid domestic solar in rural Kenya.More: Africa’s ‘largest’ solar-plus-wind-plus-storage project unveiledlast_img read more

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FlyQuest becomes first esports partner for Fathead

first_imgFlyQuest, an esports organisation that competes in multiple titles, has entered a strategic partnership with Fathead, LLC, a company that sells licensed and custom decor. This is Fathead’s first venture into esports, and this deal will see the company offer licensed FlyQuest gear.Specifically, FlyQuest wall decals, wall murals, and big head cutouts will be made available through Fathead and its third party retailers. These items will be available on FlyQuest’s website and at events, too. Fathead predominantly deals in traditional sports, so FlyQuest becoming the first officially licensed esports organisation partnered with Fathead is a positive step for the scene.Scott Pogrow, Head of Business Development for FlyQuest discussed this partnership in a statement: “We are extremely excited to welcome Fathead into the FlyFam. Fathead is a market leader in creating life-size wall decals and big heads for major sports and entertainment properties, which now includes esports. Their vision aligns closely with ours of being leaders in providing fans the ability to show off their passion. Our partnership with Fathead allows us to do just that.”Robby Hogle, CEO of Fathead also had his say: “Fathead thrives on providing fans with opportunities to express their team pride in a BIG way, so we are thrilled to partner with FlyQuest, an outstanding organization that cares deeply about their fan base. We love FlyQuest’s approach to fan-inspired activations and feel we can further enhance the fan experience. Fathead is committed to the esports space and will continue to grow our presence, and we are excited to take our first step with FlyQuest.”FlyQuest has added Fathead as a partner alongside Snickers and 5-Hour Energy. Fathead is partnered with the likes of Quicken Loads, Amrock, Rock Ventures, and Cleveland Cavaliers, among many other companies.Esports Insider says: Seeing an esports organisation such as FlyQuest in the company of the NFL, NBA, MLB, and NHL is always welcome. Fathead’s offering is a tad out of the norm, we’re definitely looking forward to seeing some big head cutouts of the organisation’s players.last_img read more

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DHS Issues Hacking Alert to Small Plane Owners

first_imgThe Department of Homeland Security has issued a security alert for small plane owners, warning them that modern flight systems remain vulnerable to hacking if someone manages to gain physical access to an aircraft.An alert from the DHS critical infrastructure computer emergency response team recommends that plane owners restrict unauthorized physical access to their aircraft until the industry comes up with safeguards to address the issue, which was discovered by Boston-based cybersecurity company Rapid7.The agency adds there is no evidence that anyone has exploited the vulnerability at this point, but that officials had confirmed the security flaw and decided that it was necessary to issue the alert.Rapid7’s tests showed that an attacker could possibly disrupt electronic messages from being transmitted across a small plane’s network by attaching a small device to the aircraft’s wiring. Subsequently, engine readings, compass data, altitude and other readings “could all be manipulated to provide false measurements to the pilot,” states the DHS alert.Large aircraft typically use more complex systems and are required to meet additional security requirements. The DHS alert also does not apply to older small planes, which use mechanical control systems.Jeffrey Troy, president of the Aviation Information Sharing and Analysis Center, echoes the need to improve security in networked operating systems, but adds that hacking depends on being able to bypass physical security controls that are mandated by law. He concludes that with access, “you have hundreds of possibilities to disrupt any system or part of an aircraft.”The Federal Aviation Administration said in its own statement that a hacking scenario is unlikely, but that the Rapid7 report is “an important reminder to remain vigilant” regarding physical and cybersecurity aircraft procedures.last_img read more

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