Giants hitting coach Alonzo Powell discusses offense’s struggles, adjusting to AT&T Park

first_imgST. LOUIS–There were days when the Giants’ offense looked like it was destined for improvement.After the club finished dead last in the major leagues in home runs and 29th in runs scored a season ago, the Giants showed early signs that things may be different this year.Brandon Belt was poised for a career year. Brandon Crawford was the best hitter in the National League for a six-week stretch. High-profile offseason acquisitions Andrew McCutchen and Evan Longoria started to turn their seasons …last_img read more

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Ask government for help: Motlanthe

first_img27 February 2012Members of households with no income, students seeking bursaries, job-seekers looking to be re-skilled … Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe has called on South Africans who need help from the government to come forward so they can be assisted.“We are keen to help those who need help,” Motlanthe said during a visit to government War on Poverty projects in Krugersdorp, Gauteng province on Friday.Motlanthe encouraged those who needed assistance to seek help at their local municipal offices.“When people are assisted, they must make a meaningful contribution to the economy,” he added, emphasising that the government was willing to help by re-skilling individuals who had the potential to steer their households out of poverty – calling such individuals “change agents”.The government’s War on Poverty campaign, launched in August 2008, targets the most deprived communities in the country, seeking to reach people with limited or no access to any of the services or programmes offered by the government.Motlanthe was visiting one of these projects, in the form of a food bank set up by the Gauteng provincial government to provide relief to households in distress. The food bank currently supplies food and other essentials to around 60 000 individuals.Motlanthe also visited a small-scale farm in Dunkod which produces herbs and a range of vegetables and supplies to various retailers. The Gauteng government handed over a pack house to the farm as part of government’s programme to assist emerging and small-scale farmers.Motlanthe noted that one of the best ways to win the war on poverty was for people to start growing their own vegetables.Motlanthe was accompanied on his Krugersdorp visit by Gauteng Premier Nomvula Mokonyane, Minister in the Presidency for Performance Monitoring and Evaluation, Collins Chabane, MECs and senior provincial government officials.Other dignitaries included Energy Minister Dipuo Peters, Water and Environmental Affairs Minister Edna Molewa, Rural Development and Land Reform Minister Gugile Nkwinti, and Deputy Human Settlements Minister Zou Kota-Frederics.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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Looking for a Reason to Jailbreak? How about Spotify and Google Voice?

first_imgYesterday, Swedish music service Spotifyannounced their application’s submission to Apple iTunes App Store. Spotify, which already boasts over 6 million users in Europe, is somewhat of an iTunes alternative – albeit with streaming tracks instead of downloads. However, the similarity between the two services leads some to believe that Apple, notorious for booting apps that duplicate iTunes functionality, won’t approve the new Spotify iPhone application. And in another example of Apple’s totalitarianism, the company also just pulled Google Voice and other third-party Google Voice applications from the App Store. Luckily for jailbreakers, problems like those above are less of an issue. There’s currently an open source Spotify client app available for download and the third-party GV Mobile app for Google Voice is coming soon. Spotify for iPhone JailbreakersLike the official Spotify iPhone client, the third party client app called Spot, available from Cydia, also requires a Premium account in order to work. Also like the official app, Spot lets you search for songs and build playlists. However, where the official client will let you cache playlists to listen to when the AT&T network fails or you lose your connection, the Spot application has yet to implement this type of feature according to a forum posting. That’s a big drawback, unfortunately, since the caching ability is precisely what makes Spotify feel less like a streaming service and more like a real iTunes alternative. There’s also another major issue for jailbreakers here in the U.S. looking to get on board with Spotify – the premium account. In order to run Spot, you need a premium account to sign into the app. However, in order to get a premium account, you have to sign up at Spotify.com, a site which currently prevents you from doing so because Spotify is not available in this country yet. So what good is an open source app if you don’t have a premium account, right? Fortunately, there are a few workarounds for this issue. For one, you could access the Spotify web site using a UK-based (or other European country-based) proxy server. A quick Google search presented us with several options for doing so, although we won’t point to any exact resources since this isn’t exactly the most legal way of going about things. Let’s just say this: we got to the sign up page and it was only a matter of putting in our name and account details. Another option is to purchase an account from an overseas friend who has access to the service in their country. Have them purchase the account and you pay them back after they give you the username/password. (Obviously, you’d want to go with a real friend you trust here, not some random stranger from the internet.)Either way, getting access to Spotify via Spot is a bit more difficult than we hoped it would be, but it’s not impossible if you’re really motivated. GV Mobile Coming to Cydia Although there aren’t any Google Voice alternatives available just yet, we hear that one in particular is coming soon. The third-party client application GV Mobile was among the Google Voice apps just pulled from the App Store. According to a tweet from the developer Sean Kovacs, he plans to upload the latest version of the application to Cydia (“or similar”…perhaps referring to Icy) soon. You may want to follow his Twitter account for more details as to when that occurs.For more details on jailbreaking, check out our how-to guide here. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market sarah perez A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts Tags:#Apple#How To#news#web last_img read more

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Technology Trumps Dogma, And Other Open Source Insights

first_imgMassive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Related Posts Matt Asay 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now IT + Project Management: A Love Affaircenter_img Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Tags:#Marten Mickos#Open Source#strategy A few weeks back I asked Marten Mickos (@martenmickos), CEO of Eucalyptus Systems, to comment on the changing face of open source. He did, and with the usual Mickos style. Unfortunately, a whole lot of great commentary had to be cut for space reasons.Given the brilliant insights Mickos offered, I wanted to share his comments in their entirety here. Mickos helped make MySQL arguably the most popular database on the planet, and is trying to achieve similar success with an open source cloud offering.With a string of successes—and failures—under his belt, Mickos had multiple pearls of open source wisdom to share. For instance while open-source developers have long eschewed corporate influence on open-source projects, Mickos starts by reminds us that money is critical for funding development, not to mention marketing, documentation, etc. The myth of a peace-loving, cashless open source existence is just that: a myth.On the importance of money to open source…Without money, open source will die.On the foundational principle behind open source business strategy…Some people will spend any amount of time to save money. Some will spend money to save time.On the changing face of the open source developer…Back then it seemed that open source developers were true cowboys—out on their own, following their own individual paths, valuing their nearly unlimited freedom. Today, many open source developers are happy to be salaried employees of companies that don’t really stand for open source on a corporate level (Google, HP, IBM, Oracle, etc.). When they make public presentations, they have to state that what they say is their own opinion and not necessarily an official statement of the company they represent. There is a voluntary submissiveness today that wasn’t as common before.On the role of copyleft licensing and governance…The purpose of the FOSS license and the governance model is not really to enable like-minded people to collaborate, although that’s a benefit too. It’s about enabling unlike-minded people to collaborate. The beauty of open source is that people who dislike each other can produce code for the same product.On leadership…Even in a meritocracy, even in peer-production models, people look for leaders.On critical feedback…If you, on a sustaining basis, can truly love harsh feedback and if you can truly show enthusiasm and appreciation for contributions of whatever magnitude and type, you can be wonderfully successful in open source.When people complain about your open source project, you need to hear them as saying “I would love to love you, but right now I cannot.”If nobody is opposed to your open source product/project, you are not really being popular. [This jibes well with my own observations of haters being a leading indicator of success.]On the role of branding…More than a question of licensing, it’s a question of branding. Red Hat took their open source brand “Red Hat” and made it commercial only. Then they established Fedora as the non-commercial brand. MySQL and JBoss did the opposite: they kept one unified brand for both community and commercial use. When you fork, you must use a different name, because branding is not included in the open source licenses.On apparent inconsistencies in open source “theology”…Open source people can be dogmatic, especially about others. They will eagerly demand that some project behave in this or that way for reasons of orthodoxy and purity. But they will at the same time merrily use closed systems such as iBooks because they admire those products. Technology trumps dogma. Coolness is key. All of this I say not as a complaint, but as an observation. To succeed in open source, you must learn to live with it and make the most of it.On changes to open source in the past 10 years…People didn’t know what it was, how it worked, why people did it, how it could produce great software, why it wouldn’t self-die, etc. That’s why the LAMP stack made it onto the front page of Fortune Magazine—it was so new and intriguing. Today people know open source and they know it’s an essential part of the software world.Incumbents fought it. Now they embrace it (or at least pretend to).Those who did open source just did it. There were very few people blogging about the meaning of open source, thinking about the business models, etc. Today you have those who code, those who lead communities, those who test, those who use, those who make money, those who write about it, etc.Licensing was a big issue then, for good reasons. Now it’s much less of a topic.Back then it was relatively few projects with relatively few people in them. Today there are probably 100-1000X the number of projects.Back then the infrastructure didn’t exist. Today we have Wiki, Github, Jira and other services that make it obvious how to run and govern an open source project.Ten years ago people would download distributions. Now they upload images (to the cloud).On what hasn’t changed in open source over the past 10 years…Still a lot of unbridled enthusiasm, often bordering on naïveté—with all the amazing upsides and inevitable downsides that this will bring.Open source still attracts outstanding talent.The most successful open source projects are those that target developers. Products that are supposed to be used by consumers or other non-technical people generally don’t do as well. But there are notable exceptions, as always, such as Firefox, Android and perhaps OpenOffice.last_img read more

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How the lack of interoperability standards could be killing IoT

first_imgSmall Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to… Dr. Shipeng Li Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Related Posts We are experiencing unprecedented levels of innovation in the Internet of Things (IoT), with research firm Gartner estimates that 5.5 million new things will get connected every day this year.Despite its promise, a big obstacle still stands – interoperability – the key to the viability and long-term growth of the entire ecosystem, especially consumer IoT. It is the biggest hurdle facing the industry and hindering its acceleration. McKinsey & Co. estimates that “interoperability is required for 40 percent of the potential value that IoT can provide.”See also: Wi-Fi standards needed to fuel IoT growthIoT, as it stands today, is still in its simplest stage. Basically, we have a myriad of devices that are connected to the Internet that we can control remotely and we receive notifications from. As it moves to the next level, now is the time to act. Interoperability has many layers. We’ve already solved key issues on the physical connectivity level such as wireless standards, in making sure that devices can communicate with each other within a system.However, the areas we now need to focus on are in data, human machine interfaces (HMIs), knowledge and service interoperability.Brands don’t always work well togetherCurrently, devices from different brands or even from one single brand, models and generations are incompatible at the data layer. Today you can’t transfer your data from an older version of an IoT device or different device from another manufacturer, for example, if you are using an Apple Watch and transferring to a Microsoft Band.As a result, you lose data continuity. And at the HMI level, what controls capabilities are necessary on all devices for services to flourish? For instance, specific recognition capabilities such as voice or gesture for consistency in IoT applications.On the service level, can devices talk to each other and share information to offer higher level offerings? Think of the smart home where you might have connected things – lighting, home security, refrigerator, washing machine, entertainment system, and more – from different manufacturers and systems, working together to bring greater energy efficiency, comfort, or convenience.In addition, at the knowledge level what information like user preferences can be shared between ecosystems so that consumers aren’t always having to rebuild their profiles? And finally, at the end of the day, who owns the data?These are the questions that need to be answered, and the responsibility lies with all stakeholders – companies, associations, governments and the public.Some countries are taking charge. For instance, a new industry alliance is forming to set up standards and protocols in areas of data, HMI, knowledge and service interoperability in China. But there needs to be a global response because these issues on interoperability are the same in every market. Standards, industry and consumer organizations can all play a role in defining these protocols.Consumers need to be more awareThere needs to be a higher level of awareness for consumers about their stake in IoT and much needed participation in these conversations, especially regarding their data and privacy. Governments must set directives and guidance regarding these issues. Companies from startups to global corporations also must align efforts with each other regarding policies around sharing information and technologies.My hope for IoT is for an open platform compatible with different systems and devices, easily supporting the interchanges of services, knowledge, data and communications, and where there is end-to-end protection for user data and IoT devices. Most importantly, in my opinion, allow end-users to decide who can store and use their data.Allow me to use electricity as an analogy: no one has to worry about standards for voltage and frequency. Plug in your device or appliance and you get power. Imagine if that was the case with IoT and how many devices and services will flourish. But first, we have to set the standards.center_img Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Follow the Puck Tags:#China#Internet of Things#IoT#standards last_img read more

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Amit Shah meets RSS leaders in Nagpur

first_imgBJP president Amit Shah visited the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) headquarters here on Wednesday and held a closed-door meeting with the outfit’s top brass and senior Vishwa Hindu Parishad (VHP) leaders.“Mr. Shah arrived at the Nagpur airport around noon, along with the RSS Sah-Sarkaryawaha [deputy general secretary] Krishnagopal. He directly went to the RSS headquarters in Mahal and met Mohan Bhagwat [RSS chief] and Bhaiyyaji Joshi [RSS general secretary],” said Chandan Goswami, in-charge of the BJP’s publicity wing in the city.According to sources, the newly appointed president of the VHP, Vishnu Sadashiv Kokje, some other VHP leaders, and Union Minister Uma Bharati were present at the meeting.It was not clear what discussions the BJP president had with the top RSS and VHP leaders, However, RSS sources said the Karnataka Assembly elections and outbursts of former VHP working president Pravin Togadia could have been discussed.“The Karnataka election is crucial for everyone. The outcome of this election will decide if the Lok Sabha election will take place as scheduled or earlier. Also, it is a difficult election for the BJP. The BJP president may have briefed the RSS bosses about the situation there,” an RSS member from Nagpur said on condition of anonymity.Mr. Shah came out of the RSS headquarters around 4.30 p.m. and left by an evening flight. Ms. Bharati had, however, left the meeting at 1 p.m.last_img read more

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Hanjin Shipping Officially Declared Bankrupt

first_imgImage Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license The former South Korean shipping giant Hanjin Shipping was officially declared bankrupt by the Seoul Central District Court on February 17, less than six months after it first filed for court receivership.With this move, made after a two-week period for appeal expired, the company, established in 1977, has ended its 40-year business.A bankruptcy trustee will now be appointed for the sale of Hanjin Shipping’s assets to pay off debts to its creditors, who have a deadline to report their right to claim debts until May 1, according to Yonhap News Agency.At the beginning of February, the Seoul court informed that it would end the company’s rehabilitation process as most of its key assets had been sold. The company’s remaining assets are now set to be distributed among its creditors.The company succumbed to the prolonged depression in the shipping market and filed for court receivership in late August 2016 after its creditors, led by the state-run Korea Development Bank (KDB), said they would not provide additional financial support to Hanjin starting from September 4.Since then, Hanjin Shipping started selling its assets, including its entire Asia to US route network and operations on the routes, a number of containerships, as well as its overseas businesses.Hanjin’s latest sales include its 54 percent stake in Total Terminals International (TTI), the operator of two facilities in Long Beach and Seattle, which was sold to Swiss-based Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC) and South Korean Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM).Earlier this month, the company’s creditor KDB launched sales proceedings for ten Hanjin ships, including two container vessels and eight bulk carriers.The potential buyers have until February 21 to submit their bids.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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