Thurston devastated by Origin withdrawal

first_imgFor the first time since Game Three, 2004 a State of Origin match will be played without Thurston after the champion five-eighth was officially withdrawn from the team, freeing the way for Anthony Milford to prepare for his Origin debut without any doubt.On Wednesday morning Thurston told the media that he remained hopeful of playing his 37th consecutive Origin match but some testing late on Wednesday afternoon and a subsequent scan early Thursday morning confirmed that his shoulder was in no fit state to take the field and the decision was made.The Maroons’ team doctor Matt Hislop advised Thurston that he shouldn’t play following the results of the tests they conducted on the shoulder on Wednesday but the man himself didn’t want to believe it was true until scans confirmed that it had not recovered sufficiently.”I did some testing yesterday and the results didn’t come back the way that I wanted,” a clearly devastated Thurston said. “I had a chat to the doc and physio last night and I didn’t want to believe it. “I wanted a scan to clarify that in my own mind that I’m not fit enough to play and that confirmed that this morning.”I didn’t want to believe it until this morning. I had the worst sleep last night. Once I got the scan done I had another chat to the doc.”I am relieved that the doc has taken it out of my hands because I was keen on playing.”It’s the best decision for the team moving forward and that’s the way it goes.”Confirming that the injury does not require surgery, Thurston has now targeted the Cowboys’ Round 14 clash with the Eels in Townsville to make his return. If he does make it back for that game it will be his only hit-out in six weeks prior to going into camp for Origin II.The 34-year-old has decided to step down from representative football at the end of the Kangaroos’ World Cup campaign and said this latest disappointment won’t tempt him into playing again for Queensland in 2018.”I am at peace with the decision I have made,” Thurston said.”If I don’t play another Origin game it will be devastating but I have a lot of memories that I will cherish from being part of this team.”Obviously I’m devastated. I love everything about the Origin campaign, the build-up, the final training run, the buzz around the city, the town and wherever you are.”It’s devastating not to be a part of it when that two-minute bell goes.”The withdrawal of Thurston gives Milford and Cooper Cronk four training sessions in which to bed down a new scrumbase combination, a combination Cronk admits he won’t know will work until after Game One is completed.”It’s devastating. Johnathan Thurston has been front and centre of everything that the Queensland Origin side has done for 30-odd games – he’s never missed one – but on Wednesday night he’s not going to be there,” Cronk said.”We have to pick up the slack, get the job done and there’ll be no excuses.”We’ve got a spine meeting later today and we’ll have a chat about how we want to play and use Milford’s skills but also getting him to buy into what we’ve done over a period of time because it has worked.”We can train and trial everything but we can’t answer that until about 9.30 next Wednesday night.”last_img read more

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Exclusive: Interview with Mike Inez, lead bassist of Alice in Chains

first_imgA: What’s the definition of success, you know? For me, it’s being happy and healthy, and consistent. I think that’s the whole key to this business. It’s not of 1 success and than you’re done with it, it’s about always moving the ball forward, as a team too, I think it’s very important. After all these years, we’re still best friends and we still want to keep moving the ball forward.Q: I would imagine that would be your motivation, just having a good time with friends?A: If it wasn’t for music I would have never scuba dived off the Great Barrier Reef, or just recently, I was standing in the Sistine Chapel, looking up at Michael Angelo’s art, or just meeting friends all over the world. Still to this day, I just really, really love it. It’s scary too because, especially here in America, they’re pulling back the funding on music programs. My biggest fear is that there is a young Kurt Cobain out there who is a great song writer that is not going to get into music because there’s no money in it. I hope people stay motivated to make music.Q: Is there a message you would like to send to that generation?A: Oh god, just make noise, make a lot of noise. I always break it down like that. We’re still just 4 guys in a room making noise. Whether it’s a very small rehearsal room or playing these big stadiums, it’s just 4 guys up there making a lot of racket. It’s just a beautiful feeling when you get with your friends and create something cool that you feel is special and take it out, play it live and see the reaction of people liking that, it’s just such a good experience.Advertisement Q: Can you tell me a little about your upcoming tour?A: This will be the last leg of this year, than well probably start again next year in the spring. We’ve been all over this plant, we’ve done the States a couple times, Canada with Monster Truck before, we did South America, all of South America; we did Australia, Singapore, Japan, we’ve been to Europe twice. We just got back from doing a bunch of stadium gigs with Metallica, Black Sabbath, and Iron Maiden in Europe. This will be the final 14 shows of this year, so we’re going to go out with a bang and leave it all out on the field.Q: This new album you have, ‘The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here’, seems to be getting great reviews. In fact, I understand it came close to number 1 on the billboard charts. How does that feel for you and the band members?- Advertisement -A: Over the years, we don’t really pay attention to those numbers anymore as much. I don’t think it means as much as it use to. Everybody downloads it, steals it, or gets it other ways… I don’t think those numbers are as significant as they used to be. It’s still a nice feeling, I’m not saying it’s a bad thing; it’s just not as good of thing as it use to be.Q: In the past, you’ve been honoured with 8 Grammy nominations…A: Even more than that. I’m not sure.Advertisement Q: How do you usually celebrate a successful concert?A: It’s funny; everybody thinks it’s a Saturday night, beautiful weather in Paris every night we play. But for every time there’s a nice night like that, there’s always a bad night like in Wichita, Kansas when you have the flu and have to play for a few hours in the middle of winter.Q: Why did you choose the lifestyle of a rock star? What made you take that route?A: I come from a long line of musicians and I always knew that I would be a musician. I didn’t know I would be in the Ozzy Osborne band at 23, which kind of just changed my life right there. I always wanted to be a musician, but I didn’t know what it actually entailed until I was in the Ozzy Osborne band…It’s been an amazing run for me; I got a lot of stories and it’s really fun to see it at that level at such a young age…I’m 48 years old now so I’ve been doing this for almost 25 years and I got to tell you, I still think it’s one of my favourite things in the whole planet. When (I’m) walking up the ramp and my base tech hands me my instrument. Just that moment before you walk out there to play, it’s so exhilarating and fun. After all these years, I still love it like a kid.Q: What do you owe your success to?Advertisement Q: Over the years I would imagine you start to loose count.A: It’s always a fun party every time we get nominated. You get to go there, fly to L.A. or New York and you get to hang out, go to these parties, and see people like Celine Dion and Michael Bolton in the flesh.Q: That must be a story for another day. Some great parties at the Grammy Awards, eh?A: Kind of boring, our parties are way better.Advertisement Q: Going back to your new album, ‘’The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here’, what can people expect?A: I think we have a new video coming pretty soon, I think (the album has) been out for well over a year now, I would imagine. It’s just been a long rush for us. We released it and than pretty much we’ve just been on the road for 18 months straight. We’ve been just working it and working it. I think we start in the spring again and we got some really good plans, so we’ll see how that develops. Like I said before, we just keep going forward. You can’t rest on your loyals in this business, especially in this day and age.Q: What would you say to people who may have never heard your work?A: Have a listen, come to our show, drink our beer, and eat our food. We’re very blessed…We can pretty much go anywhere and play, and people show up. For that, we’re very, very grateful and blessed. We don’t take that lightly at all; we just really love the people we meet while we’re out there. It’s always a good, collective experience when we all get together with our audience. Just come on by, it’s really easy. If you like our music, support it. Come by and see a show.Q: Before I let you go Mike, is there anything you would like to add that I didn’t touch on?A: I just can’t wait to get up there to B.C. Canada is actually my favourite country in the world. The people are fantastic, and the way the country works. I just can’t wait to get up there.Tickets are still available, and may be purchased online at tigerboxofficeplus.ca, by phone at 1-877-339-8499, or in person at the 2 Tiger Box Office Plus locations in the Encana Events Centre, and at Tiger Printing & Stationers.last_img read more

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