Raiders’ pre-camp offensive depth chart

first_imgBubble: Mike GlennonLong shot: Nathan PetermanAnalysis: Nothing to see here except plenty of Carr going into a season which will determine whether he remains … NAPA — The Raiders are younger, faster and more talented on offense. When they begin full-squad practices Saturday, we’ll begin to see if that translates into being much better than the unit that ranked No. 23 in the NFL last season.A look at the offensive depth chart (*projected starter):Quarterbacks (3)Lock: *Derek Carrlast_img read more

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Free entry into SA national parks

first_imgStudents of the Southern African WildlifeCollege in Hoedspruit, Limpopo. It is hopedthat National Parks Week will encouragemore people to choose conservationas their career.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. Formore free photos, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Reynold Thakhuli Sanparks GM: Media, Events andStakeholder Relations+27 12 426 5170 or +27 83 552 2020Janine ErasmusSouth Africans visiting the country’s national parks will get in for free during National Parks Week, which runs from 14 to 20 September 2009.The promotion will kick off with a ceremony in the Kruger Park’s Mopani camp.There are certain entry conditions during this time: presentation of a valid South African identity document is compulsory, although schoolchildren and other youth under 16 will be allowed in for free without proof of identity.However, free access will not be granted to commercial ventures like tour operations. In addition, the free access only applies during the week i.e. until 18 September.It’s also worth noting that Boulders in the Table Mountain National Park is not part of the free access scheme and normal tariffs will apply to all visitors. Boulders is the picturesque home of the famous Jackass penguin colony and is one of only three areas, along with Silvermine and the Cape of Good Hope, in the largely open-access Table Mountain park that asks for a conservation fee.Conserving natural heritageSouth African National Parks (Sanparks) oversees the annual week-long awareness drive, which was launched in 2006 with the ongoing theme of Know Your National Parks.The initiative aims to promote national parks as affordable holiday destinations for local and international visitors, particularly those with families.Sanparks CE David Mabunda said the National Parks Week campaign encourages South Africans, especially those in nearby communities, to visit their parks. This will help to develop a greater sense of national pride in this precious natural heritage, which will translate to more appreciation and conservation of the areas, ensuring their survival for future generations.“Through this project we also aim at building stronger constituencies and ambassadors of conservation and the environment,” commented Mabunda.Besides the free access, Sanparks has planned a host of activities in all parks – including exhibitions; tree-planting; clean-up and conservation drives; interaction with schools, pensioners and other community groups; and walks and talks with game rangers, among others.“The survival of the South African national parks system and our natural and cultural heritage lies in the people of South Africa and this year we are focusing on involving young people and communities,” said Mabunda.Sanparks says it will continue to promote National Parks Week in recognition of the natural treasure under its protection.“National parks provide recreational tourism experiences, opportunities to learn and grow, and places of quiet refuge,” said the organisation in a statement. “Through this week’s celebration we want to positively influence and inculcate responsible behaviour towards national parks and the environment as a whole.”Saving ecosystemsSanparks was established in 1926 when the National Parks Bill was tabled in Parliament, replacing the previous game reserve system. The latter placed more emphasis on the protection of animals than the protection of ecosystems as a whole. Also in 1926 the Kruger National Park became the first in Sanparks’s stable and the inaugural Sanparks board was appointed.Today the organisation is responsible for the management of almost 4-million hectares of protected land in 22 national parks.These are West Coast, Table Mountain, Bontebok, Karoo and Agulhas, in the Western Cape province; Knysna, Wilderness, Tsitsikamma, Addo Elephant, Mountain Zebra and Camdeboo in the Eastern Cape; Namaqua, |Ai-|Ais/Richtersveld, Augrabies, Kgalagadi, Tankwa Karoo and Mokala in the Northern Cape; Golden Gate in the Free State; Marakele and Mapungubwe in Limpopo; Kruger in Mpumalanga; and Groenkloof in Gauteng.In recent years Sanparks has largely focused its efforts on making national parks more accessible to visitors to the country, so the tourist drawcards can continue contributing to the economy and help develop the rural areas surrounding them.Queries or comments? Contact Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.last_img read more

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Awards honour four young SA creatives

first_img27 November 2014Four young South African artists were announced as winners of the 2014 Arts & Culture Trust awards at a ceremony in Johannesburg on Wednesday night.The ACT awards, now in their 20th year, recognise young professional creatives with promising futures ahead of them. The artists must be within five years of their professional careers. Finalists are nominated by the public, and adjudicated by a panel of judges.This year’s winners are Jade Bowers for theatre, Thabo Makhethe-Kwinana for design, Bevan de Wet for visual art, and Nomfundo Xaluva for music.Inspired“We never cease to be inspired by the ImpACT Award winners each year,” said Pieter Jacobs, the chief executive of the trust. “They follow in the footsteps of remarkable artists who have continued to soar to greater heights, not only locally but internationally as well.”The judging panel was headed by Caroline Smart, ACT Ambassador and creative professional. Other judges were visual artist David Koloane, arts education and heritage activist Nadia Virasamy, 2013 Standard Bank Young Artist for Theatre Prince Lamla, culture and craft mentor Eugenie Drakes, and jazz music legend Herbie Tsoaeli.“The judges look for impressive progress and excellence in both the individual and the impact that they have made in their communities,” Smart said. “ACT is committed to supporting their development path and ultimate success.”Previous winners of the award include Gloria Bosman, Arlin Bantam, Kamogelo Nche and Tankiso Mamabolo, all of whom performed at the ceremony on Wednesday.Lifetime achievementACT also honours those who have had a lifelong commitment to the arts. This year, a special award was given to Mandie van der Spuy for arts advocacy. Other lifetime achievement awards made this year include Sam Nzima for visual art, Richard Cock for music, Andre P Brink for literature and Richard Loring for theatre.The Arts & Culture Trust is a funding agency which aims to increase the amount of money available for arts and culture initiatives, and to apply these funds to innovative, sustainable projects that make a meaningful contribution to society.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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How reliable will this year’s test plot data be?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio’s corn and soybean crops experienced exceptional growing conditions in 2015, including record rainfall in June and July followed by a drier than normal August conditions in many areas. The persistent rains saturated soils and caused localized ponding and flooding. These conditions resulted in root damage and N loss that led to uneven crop growth and development between and within fields. Agronomists often question the value of test plot data when adverse growing conditions severely limit yield potential.The validity of test plot results depends primarily on whether effects of the varied stress conditions are uniform across test plots. If not, test plot data may be questionable. To be certain that effects of stress were fairly uniform, it would be necessary to monitor test plots on a regular basis to determine crop response to the various stresses as they occurred; however, such monitoring was probably unlikely in many test plot fields.Another problem with test plot results is that the various yield limiting factors may accentuate the natural “variability” already existing in the field, and may thereby further “mask” the true treatment effects that are being compared. Stress conditions like the ponding and saturated soils this year coupled with slight differences in soil organic matter, drainage, weed control, etc. across a field may magnify differences in crop performance.If one assumes that the varied stress conditions affected test plots uniformly within a field, then interpretation of test plot data becomes an issue. This issue can be especially relevant when evaluating results of hybrid and cultivar performance trials affected by excessive soil moisture. Did a hybrid or cultivar yield well under saturated soils because it genuinely possessed some flooding tolerance or because it was planted in better drained areas of the field? This year we have more than a 100 bushels per acre difference in plot yield between hybrid entries planted at different locations within a field that are related to soil drainage and N loss. Usually there are striking visual differences between such plots associated with plant height and overall plant health but differences are not always pronounced.Test plot information this year can still be very useful but take precautions. Results from single on-farm strip tests should not be used to make a decision on adoption of a treatment or variety. Even replicated data from a single test site should be avoided, especially if the site was characterized by abnormal growing conditions. Use test plot data from multiple sites (and preferably from at least two years of testing) and inquire about the weather patterns and conditions associated with the results. Look for consistency in a product or cultivar’s performance across a range of environmental conditions.last_img read more

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