Amu tells CJ this is Bangladesh not Pakistan

first_imgIn an oblique reference to chief justice’s remarks, industries minister Amir Hossain Amu on Sunday said Bangladesh did not emerge from any communal poison like Pakistan but through the sacrifices of three million people. “Such utterances are meaningless… this is not Pakistan…this is Bangladesh,” he said apparently venting angers at the chief justice’s remarks.Chief justice Surendra Kumar Sinha, as media reported on Sunday, said the judiciary is having enough patience. Amu said, “We’ve heard our chief justice asked to look at Pakistan. We had looked at Pakistan many days ago, not today.”Recently, Pakistan’s Supreme Court ousted its prime minister Nawaz Sharif over corruption claims.The Awami League leader said the judges came to the court set up for hanging Bangabandhu in the Agartala “conspiracy” case but the people of Bangladesh and Pakistan do not know how and when they (judges) fled. “We’ve had that experience. If such things need to be seen again here, then the people of the country are ready (to face it).”The industries minister said conspiracies are being hatched against Bangladesh to make it a failed state. “We’re seeing conspiracies from various fronts. Some are trying to catch fish in troubled waters. A vested group is conspiring to hamper the country’s security and halt its pace of development,” he said.Amu said Pakistan is now a failed sate and they cannot tolerate today’s progress of Bangladesh. “That’s why they’re conspiring to make Bangladesh a failed state.”The minister came up with the remarks at a discussion organised by the Ministry of Industries marking the 15 August.About Bangabandhu, he said the killers did not only kill the person Bangabandhu on the black day of 15 August but also tried to kill the spirit of the independence.last_img read more

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12 Russian intelligence officers indicted for hacking US Democrats

first_imgDeputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein speaks during a news conference at the Department of Justice, Friday, 13 July 2018, in Washington. Photo: APTwelve Russian intelligence officers were indicted by a US grand jury on Friday, just three days before president Donald Trump is scheduled to meet with Russian leader Vladimir Putin, for interfering in the 2016 presidential election.Announced by deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein, the charges were drawn up by special counsel Robert Mueller, the former FBI director who is looking into Russian interference in the November 2016 vote.Rosenstein told reporters the Russian military officers were accused of “conspiring to interfere with the 2016 presidential election,” including by hacking Democratic Party emails ahead of the vote.”Eleven of the defendants are charged with conspiring to hack into computers, steal documents, and release those documents with the intent to interfere in the election,” he said.”One of those defendants and a 12th Russian are charged with conspiring to infiltrate computers of organizations involved in administering elections.”Rosenstein said he had briefed Trump about the indictment before Friday’s announcement.Trump, who is currently visiting Britain, is scheduled to meet with Putin in Helsinki on Monday.last_img read more

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Uniontown Bar and Grill Brings Nightlife to Anacostia

first_imgWASHINGTON — It’s a frigid Friday night, and the entertainment centers of the city — Chinatown, U Street, Georgetown, H Street, Capitol Hill, Adams Morgan and Barracks Row — are flourishing with people crowded into bars and restaurants, eager to  warm their fingers and enjoy good food and interesting chatter.In the southeast neighborhood of Anacostia, however, the streets are dead. The only exception is a on the 2200 block of Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue.That is the home of Uniontown Bar and Grill, one of only two sit-down restaurants in the neighborhood.Anchoring the corner of King Avenue and W Street, Uniontown sits across for the neighborhood’s iconic Big Chair and the Big Chair Coffee and Grill, the only other sit-down restaurant. Like Uniontown, it also recently reopened after being closed.Uniontown is unassuming on the outside. The only indication that something is going on inside come from the few patrons standing outside have a smoke.Inside is a multi-aged crowd. People are buying drinks, chatting, laughing and dancing to deafening music as a disco ball shoots multicolored lights across the walls and floors.Now under new management following the conviction on drug charges of the previous owner, Uniontown has an authentic Washington feel.It offers themed drinks, like the Marion Barry, the Chuck Brown and the Ballou Knight, named after the mascot of nearby Ballou High School. On the second level patrons, listen and dance to  go-go, a form of music that which originated in Washington, and enjoy hookah.Tonight, Jackie Maddox and her daughter, Christine Montgomery collect entrance fee at the front door and give out wristbands for re-entry. They both frequent the bar throughout the week.“The people draw me here,” said Montgomery, a meeting planner who lives in the neighborhood. “It’s a family atmosphere.”Montgomery is  greeted by almost every customer with a hug and a promise to meet later. ,The restaurant opens everyday at 11 a.m. closes at midnight, with the except of Sundays when they open at 1 p.m. and Fridays and Saturdays when they stay open until 2:30 in the morning. Happy hour is Monday through Friday from four to eight, and each night is a new attraction— comedy nights on Wednesdays, motorcycle night on Mondays.“On the weekdays, it’s a mature crowd and everyone comes after work to unwind,” Maddox, 54, said. “They have karaoke and jazz here. It’s really nice atmosphere.”In 2012, the restaurant closed after being open for about a year after the owner pled guilty to selling cocaine.Aftermath, which plays R&B, Pop and Go Go, have been playing at Uniontown for three weeks.Female vocalist Tiny lives in Ward 8 and was coming to the bar well before her band started playing there.“It’s a decent bar,” she said.. “It’s in the community so you can get something to eat, watch the game. It’s a nice stop.”Dmaz, 39, is a native Californian, but he said feels completely immersed in the culture whenever he’s at Uniontown.“Pure and uncut” are how the Howard University graduate  describe Uniontown.“I’m not from D.C.,” lumukanda said.  “But I love a unique authentic experience and this is it. It doesn’t get more D.C. than this.”Ayenubizu Yimenu, the owner of The Big Chair Coffee N’ Grill across the street at 2122 King Ave. says that people come eat at her restaurant, then head over to Uniontown for dancing.The Big Chair Coffee N’ Grill was one of the first sit down restaurants in the neighborhood, and similar to Uniontown was shut down for a brief stint of time due to some legal issues.Since it first opened in 2010, Yimenu has had trouble getting an entertainment license so she can get a DJ as well but she isn’t fretting over lost business.“People still come in here,” she said. “They like my food.”last_img read more

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Rousseff reelected on call to save Brazils social gains

first_imgIn a campaign that featured ‘change’ as the buzzword for both sides, the incumbent argued that Neves’s economic proposals would produce recession and erase gains for 36 million Brazilians who have risen from extreme poverty under her party’s rule. Rousseff in her victory speech pledged to engage in dialog as she vows to stimulate economic growth and fight corruption. ‘Some times in history, narrow results produced much stronger changes than very wide victories,’ she said in Brasilia. ‘From now on in Brazil we will have a debate of ideas, clash of positions that may produce areas of consensus capable of moving our society along the paths of change that we so badly need. My first words are a call for peace and unity.’ Neves said in his concession speech that he phoned Rousseff to casking to unite the country.last_img read more

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