What to do post-run to maximize your results

first_imgRELATED STORY:Tabal delivers first gold medal for PH, rules women’s marathonSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next As well as staying hydrated during a run in order to prevent injuries, cramping, and early fatigue, it is also important to rehydrate after you have finished, as well as maintaining your fluid intake throughout the rest of the day. If you are training for a marathon this is even more important; marathon runners can lose up to 5 percent of their total body weight during the race, or around four to five liters of fluids on average.To avoid dehydration and help the body replenish its reserves, be sure to drink plenty of fluids in the hours after your run, whether you prefer water, fruit juice or sports recovery drinks. You should also avoid alcohol if you really want to reach peak performance. Not only will it dehydrate you, but celebrity trainer David Kirsch also adds that “during a wellness program there is no room for hangovers. You need to be fresh, focused, and on top of your game to achieve the desired results.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogGet a good night’s sleepDr. Andrew Murray, who works predominantly with runners but also swimmers and cyclists, says that the one thing they all have in common is they are “world class sleepers.” He recommends at least seven hours a night to reduce the risk of infection and stay healthy, plus a good night’s sleep is possibly the best way for your body to repair itself after exercise. Kirsch also adds that skimping on sleep “will sabotage your hard-earned workout gains,” so to get the most out of your run, as well as reach your true running potential in your next one, make sure you prioritize sleep. Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Image: Geber86/Istock.com via AFP RelaxnewsWith the Chicago Marathon taking place this Sunday, Oct. 8, many may be feeling inspired by the World Marathon Major to start their own running regime. Whether you’re a beginner or a marathon expert, here we round up some of the key things to do post-run to look after your body and maximize your performance.Drink upADVERTISEMENT Mos Burger to open in Manila; teases with a pop-up DAY6 is for everybody MOST READ TNT import Rice ejected early in Game 4 How to help the Taal evacuees In ‘Jojo Rabbit,’ Comedy and Drama Collide Refuel your musclesDalton Wong, trainer to Hollywood star Jennifer Lawrence and founder of TwentyTwo Training advises a post-run combination of protein to repair, fat to help you feel full, and carbs to fuel the body. He recommends a protein smoothie or a proper meal between one hour to 90 minutes after your run, and nuts, seeds, and/or an apple as good options for snack until you can eat a real meal. Dr. Murray agrees, also recommending a ratio of three portions of carbs to one portion of protein within the hour after your run. Pasta or a baked potato with tuna, a chicken sandwich, eggs or pulses are all good choices.Stretch it outAlthough Dr. Murray says you don’t need to do a specific warm-up, just something to get you moving a little and ready for running, he does recommend a cool down, especially when you have done a more intense, longer run. Cooling down and stretching is a key step in any running plan to aid recovery, reduce muscle soreness and prevent injuries.Foam rolling can also be useful, not only straight after your run but also the day after and days following if you’re still feeling sore. It can also be particularly helpful when combined with stretching because it helps break up adhesions, which allows for a better and deeper stretch. JBADVERTISEMENT Nueva Ecija warehouse making fake cigarettes raided, 29 Chinese workers nabbed It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:02‘Bata’ Reyes bows to Vietnamese foe for another SEA Games bronze02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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Newcastle v QPR: Barton and Onuoha start

first_imgNedum Onuoha and former Newcastle man Joey Barton return to the QPR starting line-up for the game at St James’ Park, while Bobby Zamora and Charlie Austin both start up front.Rangers are without Eduardo Vargas following the birth of the Chilean’s baby daughter.Newcastle are without captain Fabricio Coloccini, Steven Taylor, Rolando Aarons, Cheick Tiote and Mehdi Abeid.Ryan Taylor, who has been steadily returning to full fitness after long-term injury, makes his first start for the Magpies since March 2012 Newcastle: Krul; Janmaat, Williamson, Dummett, Haidara; R.Taylor, Sissoko Colback; Cabella, Perez, Ameobi.Subs: Elliot, Streete, Anita, Gouffran, Armstrong, Ferreyra, Cisse. QPR: Green, Onuoha, Caulker, Dunne, Yun, Barton, Henry, Sandro, Fer, Zamora, Austin.Subs: McCarthy, Traore, Phillips, Isla, Mutch, Kranjcar, Hoilett.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Warriors mailbag: Explaining Stephen Curry’s staggered minutes

first_img* * *Subscribe to the Mercury News and East Bay Times for $40 a year and receive a free Warriors championship coffee table book* * *OAKLAND – Another week means another mailbag in which Warriors fans express angst about the team’s lack of consistent dominance. Another theme has emerged, though. What is the deal with Stephen Curry’s new role?Why is Warriors coach Steve Kerr staggering Curry’s minutes with the second unit? Why is Curry sitting during significant portions of the fourth quarter? …last_img read more

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Philosophy Roundup

first_imgPhilosophy of science is a broad discipline incorporating many sub-disciplines such as intellectual history, sociology, ethics, rhetoric, logic, demarcation of science from pseudoscience, classification, discovery, verification, explanation and more.  A dozen recent news stories discussed some of these topics.Medical ethics:  PhysOrg reproduced an AP story about medical research on humans in the US in the 1940s to 1960s.  The details are quite shocking and were “unusually unethical, even at the time.”  They included giving diseases to prisoners and the disabled.  The news media largely ignored these stories, the article said.  This entry touches on the need to set ethical limitations on scientific inquiry.Futurism, ethics, and health:  Should genetic interventions be used to create healthy babies?  This sensitive question, behind which lurks the ghost of positive eugenics, was discussed cheerfully in Science Magazine (25 February 2011: DOI: 10.1126/science.1204088) on the 10th anniversary of the Human Genome Project.    “Genetics is a way of thinking.  Genomics is a set of tools,” Mary-Claire King wrote, glossing over the potential for abuse of thinking and tools.  “If we think rigorously about genetics and use these tools well,” she said, “the resolution of inherited disorders on behalf of our patients will be bounded only by our imaginations.  One healthy infant at a time is not a bad way to begin.”    But how will babies born without genetic intervention be treated by society?  King assumed universal agreement on the meaning of well and spoke of rigor, good and bad as if bounded only by human imagination.  A quick look back at the 20th century shows some not-so-cheerful ways our predecessors applied their imaginations using thinking and tools.Philosophy of discovery:  A story on PhysOrg exemplified how, in the philosophy of science, discovery is distinct from explanation.  Some mathematicians at Emory University were on a nature hike when a “Eureka!” moment hit them.  “So what is an ‘aha’ moment?” the article asked.  “The way I see it, it’s not something that happens to you instantly,” said Ken Ono.  “It just happens to be the moment that you realize the fruits of all your hard work.”  Article includes a video clip of Ono telling his story on the trail.Paradigms and models:  Some European philosophers have tried to put Thomas Kuhn on a chip.  In “Emergence and Decline of Scientific Paradigms” described on PhysOrg, they produced a mathematical model showing how scientific paradigms rise and fall.  “Although many factors influence the emergence and decline of such scientific paradigms,” the article said, “a new model has captured how these ideas spread, providing a better understanding of paradigm shifts and the culture of innovation.”    Like some meta-theory on theories, or observation of observers, their mathematical model had all the coldness of monitoring bacteria in a Petri dish.  Paradigms mentioned included “climate change, nanotechnology and chaos theory”.  Not apparent was how their model intersected any conception of validation, verification, or truth.History of science:  An article at PhysOrg might be enough to make a modern scientist scream.  Dr. Lawrence Principe, historian of science at Johns Hopkins, is defending alchemy as legitimate research for its time.  In “Why many historians no longer see alchemy as an occult practice,” Phillip Schewe wrote that “the scholars who write the history of science and technology no longer lump alchemy in with witchcraft as a pseudo-science.”  Instead they view it as a precursor to chemistry.    Alchemists, they said, should not be dismissed solely for failing their main mission to turn base metals into gold; “Alchemists … were active in assaying metals, refining salts, making dyes and pigments, making glass and ceramics, artificial fertilizers, perfumes, and cosmetics” – i.e., skills useful for the emerging science of chemistry.  Famous practitioners of alchemy included Robert Boyle and Isaac Newton.Design detection:  “How nature’s patterns form” was the headline of a short article on PhysOrg.  With an image of a Fibonacci spiral pattern leading the story, the article mentioned how many universal patterns, seen in sunflowers, galaxies, animal coloration or sand dunes are the result of “some kind of stress, applied stress.”  Alan Newell at the University of Arizona was telling a meeting of the AAAS that “biological forms are controlled more by the laws of physics than by evolution,” i.e., “the products of physical forces, rather than evolutionary ones.”    Further, “Patterns arise when the symmetry of a system is broken, Newell said.  The similarity in patterns from system to system occur when the systems have similar symmetry, rather than because the systems are made from the same materials.”  Newell believes patterns are impressed on nature mechanically, but as “a consequence of biochemically and mechanically induced pattern-forming instabilities” that can be described in mathematical models.    The short article did not address why natural laws and instabilities should be symmetric, or finely tuned to reproduce a Fibonacci series, or why the human mind finds these patterns beautiful.  Newell did end, though, on a poetic note: “Mathematics is like a good poem, which separates the superfluous from the essentials and fuses the essentials into a kernel of truth.”Verification and falsification:  Nature News reported that the Apex Chert in western Australia, thought to be evidence for the oldest life on the planet, may have formed by inorganic processes.  This incident touches on several areas in philosophy of science: verification, interpretation of evidence, ethics, and history of science: “Twenty years ago the palaeontological community gasped as geoscientists revealed evidence for the oldest bacterial fossils on the planet,” the article said.  “Now, a report in Nature Geoscience shows that the filament structures that were so important in the fossil descriptions are not remnants of ancient life, but instead composed of inorganic material.”    This appears to be a case of scientists who “wanted to find life so badly that they ignored the obvious,” the article said.  Olcutt Marshall opened some philosophical cans of worms with his remark, “There is a willful blindness about these structures that sometimes has more to do with local politics than global truth.”  See also the PhysOrg write-up.Paradigm backlash:  As successful as Newtonian mechanical philosophy was in the 17th and 18th centuries, it produced a backlash, wrote George Rousseau in a book review in Nature (24 Feb 2011, doi:10.1038/470462a).  Commenting on Stephen Gaukroger’s new book The Collapse of Mechanism and the Rise of Sensibility: Science and the Shaping of Modernity 1680�1760, Rousseau noted that while most scientists are aware of Newton’s achievement, “Less familiar is the philosophical phase that followed – sensibility, the view of humans as organic creatures, incapable of reduction to the sum of their mechanical parts, especially in the affective, moral and political realms.”  Accordingly, “Stephen Gaukroger explains how the philosophies of mechanism collapsed over eight decades, to be replaced by a more sensory view of nature.”    The review warned of simplistic views of mechanical philosophy (sometimes abbreviated mechanism): “Mechanism was never a single set of principles about machine-like systems,” he said.  “It comprised an array of disparate beliefs, experiences and practices that were followed in far-flung places and presided over by its principal architects: Ren� Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke and Newton.”    Sensibility, likewise, “is a vague term,” he said.  According to Gaukroger, sensibility “allows connections to be made between natural-philosophical and moral, political, and psychological theories in a new way, shaping a new field of the moral sciences.”  While a strict mechanist or 20th-century positivist might take issue with that phrase as an oxymoron, the definition points out the necessity of philosophical judgments on the nature of science.    The 1760s, the review said, was a watershed decade and the start of the so-called Romantic era with roots in sensibility stretching back a century or more:Imaginative literature, later codified as ‘Romantic’, also drove nails into mechanism’s coffin by postulating that matter was more complex than the mechanical natural philosophers thought.  A human is not a mere machine; a fly is much harder to study than a pebble.  By focusing on human nature rather than physical matter, the language of the new literature helped to alter the way scientists conceived their models, and enabled modernity to commence its work.It is ironic that the reviewer shares a surname with Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778), an icon of Romanticism.Search for extra-terrestrial science:  Can scientists justify their work based on what they expect to find, rather than what they have found?  Rowan Hooper on New Scientist recouped the latest scoop on planet counts from the Kepler spacecraft, then launched into some philosophy: “Exoplanet findings spark philosophical debate,” he titled his article, noting that “What were once speculative and philosophical questions are now being tackled with real data, generated by NASA’s planet-hunting space telescope, Kepler.”  The word data is a philosophically-loaded question.  To what extent does data about extrasolar planets apply to the question of extraterrestrial intelligence?    Hooper heard two speakers at the recent AAAS meeting discuss how Christians and Muslims might respond positively to detection of aliens.  “Both their arguments amounted to the (to my mind) rather dubious claim that the discovery of extraterrestrial life would pose no challenge or crisis to terrestrial religion.”    Then he heard talks about the possibility of life detection by a pessimist, Howard Smith [Harvard-Smithsonian Institute for Astrophysics] and an optimist, Seth Shostak [SETI Institute].  Worried that it might take 100 generations to get in touch with aliens, Smith coined a new phrase: “the misanthropic principle says that intelligent life is so unlikely to evolve that we might as well accept that we’ll never know if we are unique or not.”  Hooper seemed to prefer Shostak’s enthusiastic prediction of successful detection within 24 years, even though it was couched in a philosophical statement, “Believing there aren’t ETs is believing in miracles.”Demarcation:  According to Research Professional John Beddington, the President’s science advisor, made waves by calling for scientists to be “grossly intolerant” of what he perceives as pseudoscience.  As for what constitutes pseudoscience, Beddington referred to “the building up of what purports to be science by the cherry-picking of the facts and the failure to use scientific evidence and the failure to use scientific method.”  Particularly, he had in mind “politically or morally or religiously motivated nonsense.”    Beddington apparently does not realize that the demarcation problem and the scientific method are issues that loom large in philosophy of science.  The assumption that science can be reduced to a bias-free method apparently motivated his sermon for scientists to be as grossly intolerant of that sort of thing as they are of racism or “homophobia.”  He views religious or political influence as “pernicious,” but he left begging the question of whether secular consensus science itself is free of such influences.    Sensing a little unease with his own moral plea, Beddington told his audience, “I’d urge you, and this is a kind of strange message to go out, but go out and be much more intolerant”  That is clearly a moral judgment, not a scientific finding.  Beddington also did not distinguish “morally … motivated nonsense” from his own moral judgments.  Whether or not one agrees with his opinions, the story illustrates how science is inextricable from moral values.Sociology of OOL:  As a reporter at a recent conference of origin-of-life researchers, Dennis Overbye, writing for the New York Times, seemed amused by the curious sociology of his subjects:Two dozen chemists, geologists, biologists, planetary scientists and physicists gathered here recently to ponder where and what Eden might have been.  Over a long weekend they plastered the screen in their conference room with intricate chemical diagrams through which electrons bounced in a series of interactions like marbles rattling up and down and over bridges through one of those child’s toys, transferring energy, taking care of the business of nascent life.  The names of elements and molecules tripped off chemists’ tongues as if they were the eccentric relatives who show up at Thanksgiving every year.While not unkind to their ramblings, Overbye found plenty of confusion, disagreement, and ignorance to showcase.  His last quip was about Craig Venter’s intelligent design project to create synthetic life: “And so his genome is now in the process of acquiring its first, non-Darwinian mutation.”Science and Meaning  What does science mean?  In the New York Review of Books, Freeman Dyson discussed information theory and the history of science under the headline, “How We Know.”  In the body of his book review of The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood by James Gleick, Dyson, while trying to clear up some misinformation, exposed some embarrassments in science that call into question not only how we know, but what we know:The public has a distorted view of science, because children are taught in school that science is a collection of firmly established truths.  In fact, science is not a collection of truths.  It is a continuing exploration of mysteries.  Wherever we go exploring in the world around us, we find mysteries.  Our planet is covered by continents and oceans whose origin we cannot explain.  Our atmosphere is constantly stirred by poorly understood disturbances that we call weather and climate.  The visible matter in the universe is outweighed by a much larger quantity of dark invisible matter that we do not understand at all.  The origin of life is a total mystery, and so is the existence of human consciousness.  We have no clear idea how the electrical discharges occurring in nerve cells in our brains are connected with our feelings and desires and actions.    Even physics, the most exact and most firmly established branch of science, is still full of mysteries….Scientists get a kick out of the endless quest: “The vision of the future as an infinite playground, with an unending sequence of mysteries to be understood by an unending sequence of players exploring an unending supply of information, is a glorious vision for scientists,” he said, but not to artists, writers, and ordinary people.  Dyson worried about the flood of information around us being separated from meaning.  “Now we can pass a piece of human DNA through a machine and rapidly read out the genetic information,” Dyson noted, “but we cannot read out the meaning of the information.  We shall not fully understand the information until we understand in detail the processes of embryonic development that the DNA orchestrated to make us what we are.”    Claude Shannon, who felt “Meaning is irrelevant” to his information theory, started a “flood of information in which we are drowning,” Dyson said.  Is our fate to look out upon, as Jorge Luis Borges portrayed the universe in 1941, a “library, with an infinite array of books and shelves and mirrors,” never knowing what it all means?  “It is our task as humans to bring meaning back into this wasteland,” Dyson concluded.  “As finite creatures who think and feel, we can create islands of meaning in the sea of information.”    While Dyson examined the definition of information in detail in his review, he left dangling an even more important definition: the meaning of meaning.  Is meaning defined by the individual artist, writer, or ordinary person?  Who decides when something is meaningful?  Are islands of meaning grounded on a continent of truth, or are they adrift in an infinite sea of meaningless information?For a look at some of these issues from proponents of intelligent design, see an examination of Freeman Dyson’s article by Denyse O’Leary on Uncommon Descent, another O’Leary article on Uncommon Descent about origin-of-life science, a treatment of Beddington’s outrage against pseudoscience on the blog Darwin’s God by Cornelius Hunter and O’Leary.  In a subsequent post on Uncommon Descent, O’Leary quoted Frank Furedi who views Beddington’s intolerance as a fast-backward to the Middle Ages.    There’s a new anthology of essays by creationists that calls into question the objectivity of science.  The description of Sacred Cows In Science: No Objectivity Allowed, Norbert Smith (ed.) on Amazon.com states,Science was at one time defined by its method.  Carefully controlled experiments, provisional conclusions, and considered debate once defined the field.  But those days have passed.  Today, science is defined by public policy statements, consensus, and a set of metaphysical assumptions that cannot be directly tested.  Students are told that science is in conflict with “faith” or, worse yet, that faith operates in a different “magisterial” [sic]with no real application to the world we inhabit.Chapters include material on life sciences, physical sciences, and behavioral sciences.  The first reviewer agreed, “Science should be a discipline based on dissent, but as more and more science becomes publicly funded, ideas become entrenched, and outside ideas are no longer heard.”This is all interesting material with too much to comment on in each article.  Readers are encouraged to become knowledgeable about these controversies with the Baloney Detector in good working order and refine their philosophy of science in light of these real-world issues.  Science is what scientists do – unless they can defend aspiring to an unattainable goal.    One overriding theme in all the above is how science and philosophy are both human enterprises, subject to all the biases, assumptions, limitations, mistakes, and changes of mind connected with any other human activity.  One can hope to approach limitations with more clarity in a systematic way, but they are still limitations.    One thing we need more than science or philosophy is wisdom.  The writer of Psalm 119 offered a way up: “I have more understanding than all my teachers, for your testimonies are my meditation.” (verse 99).  Indeed, the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom (Proverbs 9:10), and of knowledge (Proverbs 1:7).    Why is the fear of the Lord essential?  Why is it the beginning of wisdom and knowledge?  Because without it, science is impossible.  The Lord is the source of the morality, integrity, and wisdom needed to even hope for a clear scientific understanding about any subject – or a philosophy of anything.    Atheists may do science, but they cannot justify what they do.  When they assume the world is rational, approachable, and understandable, they plagiarize Judeo-Christian presuppositions about the nature of reality and the moral need to seek the truth.    As an exercise, try generating a philosophy of science from hydrogen coming out of the big bang.  It cannot be done.  It’s impossible even in principle, because philosophy and science presuppose concepts that are not composed of particles and forces.  They refer to ideas that must be true, universal, necessary and certain.    It’s time science gets back to the beginning of wisdom.  You can help by rapping a scientist’s knuckles every time he steals from the Christian smorgasbord of presuppositions.  While bandaging his knuckles, encourage him with the upside of a scientific revolution based on the Bible: it makes genuine scientific knowledge, if not exhaustive, at least possible.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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15 Things Blogging Venture Capitalists Love in 2011

first_imgVenture Capitalists have a big impact on the software that hits the web and the rest of us have been fortunate to get a good look into many of their minds thanks to the recent rise of the blogging VC. Some VCs love to share how they think about various technology issues on their blogs – but what do they really love?VC Larry Cheng posted his 4th annual Venture Capitalist Blog Index today, listing and ranking 155 blogs written by venture capitalists. I discovered it when a feed we have in our team RSS reader tracking comments posted around the web by VC Fred Wilson delivered the link. I put the list into ITA Software’s Needlebase, scraped a list of all the blogs, then put them in a Blekko custom search engine. I searched for the word “love” (as I always do in any new search opportunity) and found that these 155 blogging VCs have used the word love in exactly 15 blog posts so far this year. What do they love? Read on for an amusing survey of 15 things blogging VCs love in 2011. Mark Suster loves info graphics. He said so in a comment on his post How to Handle a VC Presentation with No Deck.Chris Dixon says that people love horse races like NYC vs Silcon Valley, Facebook vs Twitter, IPO markets vs private exchanges, the valuation of some startup vs some other startup. But he says that “these questions are all footnotes that will be forgotten in a few years,” in his wide-eyed and awesome blog post PREDICTING THE FUTURE OF THE INTERNET IS EASY: ANYTHING IT HASN’T YET DRAMATICALLY TRANSFORMED, IT WILL.Brad Feld loves working with entrepreneurs and helping create new companies. It’s all about doing what you love, he writes in a reflection post titled Snow in Seattle.Jeff Bussgang says that if you love running your business, that’s one of the factors that can make it wise to walk away from large sums of money. He’s sat with two portfolio companies that have made that decision recently and wrote about it in a post titled Walking Away From Liquidity.Charlie O’Donnell is excited about the new API for Q&A site Quora he says he’d love a Quora column in Tweetdeck and a Quora Feedera email digest in his inbox. He’s looking for a way to “monitor the important conversations without having to sit in it all day.” Hey Charlie, this isn’t as cool as a Tweetdeck column, but did you know that Quora provides RSS feeds (ReadWriteWeb asked them to and they did!) including for Answers posted by username? And the URL structure is really simple. (My answers are at http://www.quora.com/Marshall-Kirkpatrick/answers/rss) If you’ve got a list of people you find compelling, it’s not hard to build an OPML file of all the questions they answer. (I put their names in a text file, find and replace to turn those into feed URLs, then use a plain-text-to-OPML web service, save the file locally and import into a reader of your choice.) Primo signal-to-noise there, too. Will an API propel Quora into the mainstream… and will that suck?Rob Day loves the funny looking dogs that win the Westminster Kennel Dog Show. “Be polarizing,” he urges entrepreneurs raising money. “The winner always seems to be some funny-looking dog, often a variety of dog you’ve never heard of even if the general category is familiar, and probably a dog that some people roll their eyes at and some people love. That’s what you want your pitch to be.” How to raise venture capital for a cleantech startup in 2011Brad Feld loves the web design firm Slice of Lime.Albert Wenger loves being told that his idea for a namespace for people is completely crazy.Mark Suster loved getting to see the White House. How Twitter Got Me into The White House & Saved My Son’s BirthdayAlbert Wenger again, in a prior conversation about his namespace for people idea, said he’d “love to hear from folks whether they think these are real problems with the current de facto solution and how services should deal with them (ideally with examples of good or bad implementations).”Charlie Daniels would love to do an experiment with the students in his college class to test his theory that socioeconomic background is a primary determinate of a person’s comfort meeting new people.Brad Feld loves starting off the year with CES.Fred Wilson hands his blog over to guest poster Charlie Crystal, who points out that startup founders love to take risks – including stupid ones when it’s with their own money. M&A Case Study: ChiliSoftJeff Bussgang loves five apps he found in 2010 (Flipboard, Instapaper, Disqus, Foursquare and Tweetdeck) He wonders if they will blow up as businesses in 2011.Fred Wilson kicked off 2011 with the awesome statement that he loves “doing random stuff on the web which takes me to new places and new ideas.” Cheers to that, Fred! GlobalizationImage from Hikingartist.com marshall kirkpatrick Tags:#humor#web Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

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UFC strips Jones, reinstates Cormier as 205-pound champion

first_imgFILE – In this Jan. 3, 2015, file photo, Jon Jones, right, kicks Daniel Cormier during their light heavyweight title mixed martial arts bout at UFC 182 in Las Vegas. Jones has threatened to show up at WWE’s SummerSlam event and scout potential rival Brock Lesnar. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)LOS ANGELES— The UFC has stripped its light heavyweight title from Jon Jones for a third time and reinstated Daniel Cormier as the 205-pound champion after Jones’ latest failed doping test.The mixed martial arts promotion announced its decision Wednesday after the California State Athletic Commission changed the result of Jones’ victory over Cormier on July 29 to a no-contest.ADVERTISEMENT Jones has a lengthy history of misbehavior. After avoiding serious punishment in previous incidents involving cocaine use and a drunk-driving conviction, he was stripped of his title in 2015 after his involvement in a hit-and-run accident that left a pregnant woman with a broken arm.He returned to the octagon several months later and reclaimed an interim title while Cormier was injured, but Jones’ belt was stripped again in November 2016, four months after he was pulled from a rematch with Cormier at UFC 200 for failing a pre-fight doping test.Jones served a one-year suspension before returning in July, pronouncing himself wiser and more mature.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES MOST READ Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Read Next BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMCcenter_img Cormier lost the belt to Jones in a third-round stoppage at UFC 214 in Anaheim, California. Last month, USADA announced Jones had violated the UFC’s doping policy with a second positive test.The California commission made its no-contest ruling after Jones’ backup sample also failed a U.S. Anti-Doping Agency test for the same substance, the banned steroid Turinabol.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutCormier (19-1) has never lost to any opponent except Jones (22-1), the troubled UFC star. Cormier held the light heavyweight title for most of the previous two years while Jones was largely sidelined by disciplinary issues.The 30-year-old Jones could face a four-year suspension from the California commission for his second failed test, but his representatives have indicated he is expected to appeal the result by arguing that it resulted from a contaminated nutritional supplement, a defense that has worked in previous MMA doping cases. Hontiveros wants NBP doctor stripped of license for giving hospital passes PLAY LIST 01:19Hontiveros wants NBP doctor stripped of license for giving hospital passes00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  40-year-old Stephon Marbury ‘working on’ return to NBA Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding View commentslast_img read more

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Reward Your Junior MVP’s Thanks To Red Rooster

first_imgWhether you want to honour your best and fairest or lifetime members, the new Red Rooster Trophy Room allows you greater flexibility to configure your clubs Trophy Room.Remember the people who have made your sporting club what it is today. Available to all SportingPulse website administrators, look for the Trophy Room icon in the ‘Administrator Control Panel’ to start creating your Award Wall and Honour Board. Dear SportingPulse is glad to announce an exciting new enhancement for your club membersbrought to you by Red Rooster. Put a smile on the face of your best and most hardworking junior players each week with a Red Rooster Junior MVP Award.The newly enhanced system gives junior team managers and coaches the ability to register their details and reward three of the most valuable junior players each week with a voucher for a free cheeseburger which they can exchange at their local Red Rooster Restaurant.center_img Please see below for further information. last_img read more

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10 months agoMan Utd legend van Nistelrooy: I shouted at Ferguson & then made reconciliation

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Man Utd legend van Nistelrooy: I shouted at Ferguson & then made reconciliationby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveRuud van Nistelrooy says he still regrets leaving Manchester United in controversial fashion 13 years ago. The Dutchman enjoyed great success at Old Trafford, before a falling out with Sir Alex Ferguson resulted in him joining Real Madrid in 2006.And the striker admitted he took the first steps to mend their broken relationship.”It was very harsh, both ways,” he told Eleven Sports.”Especially after five years of having such a strong bond. I learned so much from him, and in all modesty: he from me too.”And yet the end was ruthless.”He added: “It was me who took the first step to make it okay again. I called him. A few times a year I felt bad about what I had done to him and the names I called him when he kept me on the bench the entire match in the League Cup final in Cardiff. In a blind rage I shouted at him.”I called him something. I called him a number of things in a blind rage. Cocky and stubborn as I was, I couldn’t snap out of that for some time after. That’s how it all crashed.”It was just really disrespectful, there were lots of other people there. It wasn’t all that outrageous in terms of words but it was completely out of order. Not done.”I wasn’t proud of it, still am not.” last_img read more

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a month agoWatford boss Quique Sanchez Flores: The result today damages me a lot

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Watford boss Quique Sanchez Flores: The result today damages me a lotby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveWatford boss Quique Sanchez Flores fears for his players after their 8-0 thrashing by Manchester City.He apologised numerous times to the club’s supporters following the thumping loss, but claims that the nature of the performance makes his position as coach more difficult.”We know how tough is the Premier League and every single match,” said Sanchez Flores.”When we accepted the invitation of the club to come here, to lead the team, we knew we were going to play against Arsenal and we were going to play against Manchester City.”It’s not about the margin you have when you come or not. Pep said yesterday in his press conference we know it’s not about you as a coach, it’s about the results.”So, of course, the result today it damages a lot myself, but one week ago, the results supported me. “We can see more than one week, we can see longer than one next match. It’s like this, so we need to live with this kind of consequence. It’s like this, it’s our work.”First we have to say sorry to the fans because they came to the stadium waiting for a good performance from the team and it was very difficult to be on the pitch today.”After 30 seconds we realised it would be very tough and then after 15 minutes it was impossible to play like this.” last_img read more

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Project to Protect Hope and Yallahs River Watersheds gets $119 Million

first_img A sum of $119 million has been set aside in the 2019/20 Estimates of Expenditure to carry out this and other tasks under the Integrated Management of the Yallahs/Hope River Watershed Area project. Approximately 120 farmers in the Yallahs and Hope River watershed areas of the Blue Mountains will be trained in land husbandry best practices in the upcoming fiscal year.A sum of $119 million has been set aside in the 2019/20 Estimates of Expenditure to carry out this and other tasks under the Integrated Management of the Yallahs/Hope River Watershed Area project.The project seeks to reduce pressure on natural resources in the watershed areas by increasing the practice of sustainable land use, resulting in improved management of biological diversity and enhanced flow of ecosystem services that sustain local livelihoods.The money will also be used to strengthen the activities of four community groups, conduct a knowledge exchange tour, improve agricultural practices in two communities, and implement a communication plan.Other imperatives for the fiscal year are completion of the review for the watershed area management mechanism, designing a Payment for Ecosystem Services Scheme, as well as implementation of the Global Information System (GIS) Decision Support System.The project got under way in September 2012 and some of the achievements to date include the training of 167 farmers in land husbandry best practices, and six communities trained in forest fire management.Also, 26 hectares of reforested land have been maintained, a farmer field-school graduation held for 167 farmers, and a watershed policy drafted and submitted to the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation.The project is being implemented by the National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA) with funding support from the Government and the Global Environmental Facility (GEF).It is slated to end in November 2019. Story Highlights The project seeks to reduce pressure on natural resources in the watershed areas by increasing the practice of sustainable land use, resulting in improved management of biological diversity and enhanced flow of ecosystem services that sustain local livelihoods. Approximately 120 farmers in the Yallahs and Hope River watershed areas of the Blue Mountains will be trained in land husbandry best practices in the upcoming fiscal year.last_img read more

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