64 rivers register rises 24 falls

first_img.Water levels in 64 river stations monitored by Flood Forecasting and Warning Centre (FFWC) have marked rises and 24 stations recorded falls, reports BSS.Among the 94 monitored water level stations, five are steady, a bulletin issued by FFWC said today.The Brahmaputra-Jamuna and Padma rivers are in steady state which may continue in next 24 hours.The Ganges river is in rising trend which may continue rising in next 72 hours.The major rivers of Upper Meghna basin in the North-Eastern region are in rising trend which may continue rising in the next 24 hours.A total of 250 mm rainfall was recorded during the last 24 hours ending at 6:00am today at Mohadevpur, 114mm at Lorergarh, 10 mm at Dinajpur, 95 mm at Narayanhat, 87 mm at Sunamganj and 75 mm at Moheshkhola, 72 mm at Teknaf, 68 mm at Barguna, 65 mm at Khulna and 59 mm at Jariajanjail.last_img read more

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Death toll in Banani fire climbs to 25

first_imgFirefighters recover a body from the blaze-hit Banani FR Tower, Dhaka, on 28 March. Photo: Abdus SalamAt least 25 people were killed so far and 73 people sustained injuries in Banani FR Tower fire in the capital city that broke out on Thursday afternoon.Dhaka Metropolitan Police (Gulshan Zone) deputy commissioner Mushtaq Hossain confirmed the death toll in a media briefing in front of the blaze-hit building on Friday morning.A helicopter carries water to drop on a burning office building as Bangladeshi firefighters on ladders work to extinguish the blaze in Dhaka on 28 March 2019. Photo: AFPMushtaq also said 24 bodies have already been handed over to the family members.A number of people jumped off the FR Tower to their deaths in a desperate bid to save their lives from the blaze as the devastating fire broke out at the 22-storey building at Kamal Ataturk Avenue in the capital’s Banani around 1:00pm on Thursday.last_img read more

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Whatever Happened To The Kids Whose Lead L

first_img by NPR News Susan Brink 8.29.19 12:28pm In January 2016, Goats & Soda reported on lead levels in the soil of neighborhoods near an abandoned smelter in Kabwe, Zambia — and in the blood of the children. For nearly 100 years, smoke from the smelter, which closed in 1994, had been releasing heavy metals, including lead, in the form of dust. Children have grown up playing in that dust, inhaling it — and being poisoned by it. How are the people of Kabwe faring 2 1/2 years later?To date, little has changed for the 76,000 people living in the most contaminated areas of Kabwe.In 2016, there was reason to hope for improvement. The World Bank lent the Zambian government $65.5 million for a five-year project to clean up lead-contaminated areas and treat the people affected by lead poisoning,But the title of a report from Human Rights Watch, released this month, is decidedly pessimistic: “We Have to be Worried: The Impact of Lead Contamination on Children’s Rights in Kabwe, Zambia.””It’s not getting any better,” agrees Richard Fuller, president of Pure Earth, an organization that identifies environmental toxins in poor communities and helps with cleanup. “I’ve been working on this town for 18 years. And when we looked at the place again recently, nothing has happened. It’s really upsetting.” Fuller is co-author of a book with a chapter focusing on Kabwe, The Brown Agenda: My Mission to Clean Up the World’s Most Life-Threatening Pollution.Past studies of Kabwe offered sobering statistics. To identify children with abnormally high lead levels, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention uses a reference level of 5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood. A deciliter is a metric measure equal to about one-tenth of a quart. The lowest blood level in the children measured in Kabwe was 13.6 micrograms per deciliter; the average was 48.3; and the highest couldn’t be measured because more than 25% of the children had levels higher than the 65 micrograms per deciliter the instruments could measure.Affected children can have short attention spans, behavioral problems and a host of health problems.A 2018 report in the journal Environmental Research re-analyzed data from three existing studies and estimated that more than 95% of children in those areas have elevated blood lead levels; about half of those children have levels high enough to require medical intervention.In November 2018 and April 2019, Human Rights Watch visited lead- contaminated areas to see if any progress had been made. They interviewed officials, teachers and community members, both adults and children.They found almost no encouraging signs. “A loan from the World Bank, launched in 2016 — and still no visible results on the ground,” says Joanna Naples-Mitchell, research fellow in the Children’s Rights Division of Human Rights Watch.Testing of blood levels in some children of Kabwe was done until 2016 when test kits ran out, according to the Human Rights Watch report. It also found that medicines for children with extremely high levels of lead have run out as well, so those children go untreated. Cleanup efforts of homes, schools, yards and fields are small and inconsistent, the report noted.The Human Rights Watch report found that the Kabwe cleanup and treatment project was still in the planning stages. In a June 2019 status report, the World Bank rated the Kabwe project “Moderately Unsatisfactory.” The Zambian government has responded by saying that it intends to begin cleanup of contaminated soil as well as testing and treatment of affected people before the end of 2019.There’s no clear-cut plan yet, but past pilot projects to address the problem consisted of cleaning up soil outside homes, schools and public areas, as well as ridding individual homes of dust using special vacuum cleaners, Fuller says.Dirt roads present a special challenge. In previous efforts to address lead contamination in other parts of the world, Pure Earth has found that existing dirt roads should be paved or tarred so that passing traffic doesn’t kick up contaminated dust. “But the government has said they don’t have enough money to do the roads,” says Naples-Mitchell. “If a home is cleaned but the road next to it is not, it’s only a matter of time before everything is recontaminated.”The World Bank loan is also intended to pay for diagnosis and treatment of children with lead poisoning. Naples-Mitchell says she hopes that efforts will be coordinated, or they will fail. For example, when a child is treated for lead poisoning — with nutrition or, in severe cases, with medical therapy — the child must go home to a lead-free environment or else could be recontaminated.Lead cleanup can work. “A success story is in Dong Mei in Vietnam,” says Jack Caravanos, a consultant on Pure Earth’s effort in this village of 3,000. The main industry was the informal recycling of lead acid batteries, Caravanos says. The result was highly contaminated soil — and children with blood lead levels five to 13 times higher than the CDC’s levels of concern, according to a case study by Pure Earth. During the year of the project, blood lead levels in 206 tested children dropped by 75%, according to Pure Earth’s summary of the project.But the lead contamination in Kabwe is even worse than in Dong Mei. “This is really a public health emergency that has never been treated with the urgency it deserves,” says Naples-Mitchell. “I’m hopeful that, given the attention to Kabwe right now from the World Bank project and this report, that we’ll see real change.”Fuller is not so much hopeful as just plain determined. “This is a massive human rights violation and disaster,” he says. “It has to get fixed. We have to keep pushing. We’ll find a way.”Susan Brink is a freelance writer who covers health and medicine. She is the author of The Fourth Trimester, and co-author of A Change of Heart.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR. Whatever Happened To … The Kids Whose Lead Levels Were… last_img read more

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Marquezs classic comes alive

first_imgFans of Gabriel Garcia Marquez can look forward to a rare performance of a play based on the iconic writer’s novella Chronicle of a Death Foretold in the national capital. A collaborative work by Manjari Kaul and Promona Sengupta, the performance is an unusual combination of the use of storytelling technique and characters’ first person accounts that are sometimes varying, some similar, some shaky, at times minutely detailed and some fading recollection of the murder of Santiago Nasar, the organisers said. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The adaptation of the play was organised by The Improper Fractions in association with Instituto Cervantes, Penguin Random House and India International Centre on April 30. Chronicle Of A Death Foretold, first published in 1981, speaks about the mysterious death of a young man, and chronologically retraces the situations that led to this baffling murder. The novella commences on the deceptively harmless morning of the day when Santiago Nasar was murdered. The story then retraces backwards, introducing Angela Vicario and Bayardo San Roman, a couple about to get married. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixIt is then disclosed, that on their wedding night, Roman discovers that Angela is not a virgin and returns her to her maiden house. Upon investigating, Angela’s twin brothers discover that Santiago Nasar is the man responsible for this disgraceful situation, and they set out to kill him. The day Nasar dies is the same day the Bishop comes to town to bless the newly wedded couple. In the chaos and excitement that accompany the anticipation of the Bishop’s arrival, a series of unheeded warnings and events unfold that ultimately lead to the Vicario brothers stabbing Nasar on his front door. The Vicario family leaves town, and the brothers are ultimately imprisoned for three years. Angela, who realized that she had fallen in love with Roman the night he returned her home, decides to write him letters every week. Chronicle Of A Death Foretold? was adapted into a Spanish film in 1987, and was later adapted into a Broadway musical in 1995. Marquez who also wrote Love in the Time of Cholera, No One Writes to the Colonel, The General in His Labyrinth, and The Autumn of the Patriarch besides his epic 1967 novel One Hundred Years of Solitude died at the age of 87.last_img read more

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IIMC Innovation Park ICC sign MoU to promote startups

first_imgKolkata: IIM Calcutta Innovation Park and Indian Chamber of Commerce(ICC) on Wednesday signed a MoU for energising the startup ecosystem in East and Northeast India. The MoU will bring incubator and industry together in a more formal way, IIMC Innovation Park CEO Subhrangshu Sanyal said. “We have certain strength while ICC has wide industry connect which will help us a lot to promote the startups whom we are incubating,” he said. ICC Director General Rajeev Singh said the eastern and northeastern region need greater attention in the startup growth story of the country and the chamber can offer a platform for market linkage for the startups and promote their products and services. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life”The start-ups would hugely benefit from the opportunities for mentoring and industry connect. We hope this initiative would be a game changer for the start-up movement in East and Northeast India,” he said. Singh said ICC is currently working on a new program that aims to offer all key services under a single roof at a very low cost for startups beginning from initial advisory, market linkage, fundraising and legal service. IIM Innovation Park is currently incubating 40 startups with almost half from Bengal, sources in it said.last_img read more

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