QPR did not bid for striker, says boss

first_imgBlackburn manager Steve Kean has confirmed that QPR did not make a bid for Yakubu last month.The Rovers striker was one of a host of forwards Rangers enquired about prior to Neil Warnock’s sacking as manager.And ahead of QPR’s match at Blackburn on Saturday, Yakubu claimed he had rejected a move to Loftus Road.But Kean said: “We had no bid from QPR for Yakubu. There was always going to be plenty of interest. There were many clubs that showed an interest.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Origin of Multicellularity: Back to the Drawing Board

first_imgMicro-RNAs have been found in green algae.  So?  What’s the big deal?  If you read the statements in Nature,1 it sounds like evolutionary biologists consider it a big, bad deal:The discovery, made independently by two labs, dismantles the popular theory that the regulatory role of microRNAs in gene expression is tied to the evolution of multicellularity.The finding is as startling as the discovery ten years ago that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has 19,000 genes, just 1,000 short of the human count…“People were shocked that the complexity of the genomes in these simpler creatures was similar to our own,” he [Gregory Hannon, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory] says.  Now it seems that the RNA in simple unicellular organisms could be as complex as that in higher creatures.This [lack of microRNA in algae], combined with the fact that RNA sequences differ between plants and animals, helped give rise to the idea that microRNAs evolved independently in plant and animal lineages as parts of complex regulatory mechanisms associated with multicellularity.  Now it seems that these molecules may predate that evolutionary development.“It shows how basing conclusions on studies of just one or two model organisms can really lead you astray in terms of how you think about evolutionary processes,” says Jim Umen from the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California.Nobody knows why such a simple organism needs microRNAs, nor how or when they first appeared.One thing was not under dispute, however: evolution.  “Whatever their role, their presence indicates that microRNAs could be much more ancient than previously thought; they might have persisted for more than a billion years.”1Lucy Odling-Smee, “Complex set of RNAs found in simple green algae: Single-celled organisms aren’t as basic as they seem,” Nature 447, 518 (31 May 2007) | doi:10.1038/447518b.See it again?  The incorrigibility of Darwinists (e.g., 05/10/2007 commentary).  No amount of contrary evidence has the power to release the vice-like grip of evolutionary thinking on their minds.  To shield the audience from these embarrassments, they just turn up the fogma machines (05/14/2007 commentary) and the show goes on.(Visited 25 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Awards honour four young SA creatives

first_img27 November 2014Four young South African artists were announced as winners of the 2014 Arts & Culture Trust awards at a ceremony in Johannesburg on Wednesday night.The ACT awards, now in their 20th year, recognise young professional creatives with promising futures ahead of them. The artists must be within five years of their professional careers. Finalists are nominated by the public, and adjudicated by a panel of judges.This year’s winners are Jade Bowers for theatre, Thabo Makhethe-Kwinana for design, Bevan de Wet for visual art, and Nomfundo Xaluva for music.Inspired“We never cease to be inspired by the ImpACT Award winners each year,” said Pieter Jacobs, the chief executive of the trust. “They follow in the footsteps of remarkable artists who have continued to soar to greater heights, not only locally but internationally as well.”The judging panel was headed by Caroline Smart, ACT Ambassador and creative professional. Other judges were visual artist David Koloane, arts education and heritage activist Nadia Virasamy, 2013 Standard Bank Young Artist for Theatre Prince Lamla, culture and craft mentor Eugenie Drakes, and jazz music legend Herbie Tsoaeli.“The judges look for impressive progress and excellence in both the individual and the impact that they have made in their communities,” Smart said. “ACT is committed to supporting their development path and ultimate success.”Previous winners of the award include Gloria Bosman, Arlin Bantam, Kamogelo Nche and Tankiso Mamabolo, all of whom performed at the ceremony on Wednesday.Lifetime achievementACT also honours those who have had a lifelong commitment to the arts. This year, a special award was given to Mandie van der Spuy for arts advocacy. Other lifetime achievement awards made this year include Sam Nzima for visual art, Richard Cock for music, Andre P Brink for literature and Richard Loring for theatre.The Arts & Culture Trust is a funding agency which aims to increase the amount of money available for arts and culture initiatives, and to apply these funds to innovative, sustainable projects that make a meaningful contribution to society.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Technology Trumps Dogma, And Other Open Source Insights

first_imgMassive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Related Posts Matt Asay 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now IT + Project Management: A Love Affaircenter_img Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Tags:#Marten Mickos#Open Source#strategy A few weeks back I asked Marten Mickos (@martenmickos), CEO of Eucalyptus Systems, to comment on the changing face of open source. He did, and with the usual Mickos style. Unfortunately, a whole lot of great commentary had to be cut for space reasons.Given the brilliant insights Mickos offered, I wanted to share his comments in their entirety here. Mickos helped make MySQL arguably the most popular database on the planet, and is trying to achieve similar success with an open source cloud offering.With a string of successes—and failures—under his belt, Mickos had multiple pearls of open source wisdom to share. For instance while open-source developers have long eschewed corporate influence on open-source projects, Mickos starts by reminds us that money is critical for funding development, not to mention marketing, documentation, etc. The myth of a peace-loving, cashless open source existence is just that: a myth.On the importance of money to open source…Without money, open source will die.On the foundational principle behind open source business strategy…Some people will spend any amount of time to save money. Some will spend money to save time.On the changing face of the open source developer…Back then it seemed that open source developers were true cowboys—out on their own, following their own individual paths, valuing their nearly unlimited freedom. Today, many open source developers are happy to be salaried employees of companies that don’t really stand for open source on a corporate level (Google, HP, IBM, Oracle, etc.). When they make public presentations, they have to state that what they say is their own opinion and not necessarily an official statement of the company they represent. There is a voluntary submissiveness today that wasn’t as common before.On the role of copyleft licensing and governance…The purpose of the FOSS license and the governance model is not really to enable like-minded people to collaborate, although that’s a benefit too. It’s about enabling unlike-minded people to collaborate. The beauty of open source is that people who dislike each other can produce code for the same product.On leadership…Even in a meritocracy, even in peer-production models, people look for leaders.On critical feedback…If you, on a sustaining basis, can truly love harsh feedback and if you can truly show enthusiasm and appreciation for contributions of whatever magnitude and type, you can be wonderfully successful in open source.When people complain about your open source project, you need to hear them as saying “I would love to love you, but right now I cannot.”If nobody is opposed to your open source product/project, you are not really being popular. [This jibes well with my own observations of haters being a leading indicator of success.]On the role of branding…More than a question of licensing, it’s a question of branding. Red Hat took their open source brand “Red Hat” and made it commercial only. Then they established Fedora as the non-commercial brand. MySQL and JBoss did the opposite: they kept one unified brand for both community and commercial use. When you fork, you must use a different name, because branding is not included in the open source licenses.On apparent inconsistencies in open source “theology”…Open source people can be dogmatic, especially about others. They will eagerly demand that some project behave in this or that way for reasons of orthodoxy and purity. But they will at the same time merrily use closed systems such as iBooks because they admire those products. Technology trumps dogma. Coolness is key. All of this I say not as a complaint, but as an observation. To succeed in open source, you must learn to live with it and make the most of it.On changes to open source in the past 10 years…People didn’t know what it was, how it worked, why people did it, how it could produce great software, why it wouldn’t self-die, etc. That’s why the LAMP stack made it onto the front page of Fortune Magazine—it was so new and intriguing. Today people know open source and they know it’s an essential part of the software world.Incumbents fought it. Now they embrace it (or at least pretend to).Those who did open source just did it. There were very few people blogging about the meaning of open source, thinking about the business models, etc. Today you have those who code, those who lead communities, those who test, those who use, those who make money, those who write about it, etc.Licensing was a big issue then, for good reasons. Now it’s much less of a topic.Back then it was relatively few projects with relatively few people in them. Today there are probably 100-1000X the number of projects.Back then the infrastructure didn’t exist. Today we have Wiki, Github, Jira and other services that make it obvious how to run and govern an open source project.Ten years ago people would download distributions. Now they upload images (to the cloud).On what hasn’t changed in open source over the past 10 years…Still a lot of unbridled enthusiasm, often bordering on naïveté—with all the amazing upsides and inevitable downsides that this will bring.Open source still attracts outstanding talent.The most successful open source projects are those that target developers. Products that are supposed to be used by consumers or other non-technical people generally don’t do as well. But there are notable exceptions, as always, such as Firefox, Android and perhaps OpenOffice.last_img read more

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I-T dept officials raid house, offices of Gupta brothers

first_imgIncome Tax officials raided the offices in Saharanpur and Dehradun belonging to the South Africa-based industrialists Gupta brothers. Searches were also conducted at the Guptas’ ancestral house in Ranibazar where the brothers, Ajay, Atul and Rajesh, grew up and lived till they left the country to become industrial tycoons in South Africa and close allies of the country’s former President Jacob Zuma. Mr. Zuma’s reported dealings with the brothers had rocked South African politics, leading to his resignation as President in mid-February. The Gupta brothers, however, have consistently denied any wrongdoing. “There was suspicion that the brothers were trying to bring illegal money into the country through various means. We intend to investigate if there is some basis for the suspicion,” said a senior IT department official involved with the raid. “Raids were conducted at the old Ranibazar house in Saharanpur, as well as their houses in Dehradun. We are also looking for bank accounts associated with them and properties they own,” the official said.Premise of a temple where the Gupta brothers were in the process of building a grand structure worth several crores were also raided, said the official.last_img read more

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BCCI urges ICC to appeal against ‘totally wrong’ Anderson verdict

first_imgJames Anderson was earlier a given a clean chit by Judicial Commissioner Gordon Lewis in the caseMiffed by the Judicial Commissioner’s verdict pronouncing England’s pace spearhead James Anderson not guilty in the altercation with Ravindra Jadeja, the BCCI wants the ICC to appeal against the ruling which it finds “totally wrong”.The Anderson-Jadeja Saga The BCCI was left red-faced after Judicial Commissioner Gordon Lewis found both Anderson and Jadeja not guilty of breaching ICC code of conduct during the Trent Bridge Test after a marathon six-hour hearing on August 1.BCCI secretary Sanjay Patel shot off a mail to ICC CEO David Richardson late last night asking him to appeal against the verdict.”I have written a letter last night to ICC CEO David Richardson to file an appeal against the verdict which all of us, including the team management, feel totally wrong and in violation of the particular process. Let’s see what happens,” Patel said.”We, in BCCI, cannot appeal against the verdict, only the ICC can and hence I have written the letter to Richardson and I am confident a decision will be taken within the next 48 hours,” Patel said.”How can he (Anderson) be pronounced not guilty after having admitted that he had pushed Jadeja. According to me so many laws in the ICC Code of Conduct had been violated in this particular process,” Patel added.There is, however, no video footage of the alleged physical altercation between the duo during lunch break of the Trent Bridge Test available to substantiate the Indians’ complaint.advertisementThe International Cricket Council, on its part, said it has received the Judicial Commissioner’s detailed report on the altercation and was considering its future course of action.”The ICC confirms that it has received and is considering the written decision of His Honor Gordon Lewis AM, the Judicial Commissioner, in respect of his findings thatEngland’s James Anderson and Ravindra Jadeja of India were not guilty of breaching the ICC Code of Conduct and Player Support Personnel, following an exhaustive disciplinary hearing which was held in Southampton on Friday,” the ICC said in a statement.As per Section 8.3.2 of the ICC Code of Conduct, ICC Chief Executive David Richardson has seven days – until Sunday, August 10 – to consider whether to lodge an appeal against the decision.”The ICC will make no further comment on this matter until the decision has been made,” the statement said. Richardson, who was on leave, has resumed his duties at the ICC headquarters in Dubai and is learnt to have consulted his legal team on the matter.In case Richardson appeals, a three-member panel will be formed from the members of the ICC Code of Ethics committee.The three-member panel might take upto 30 days (as per ICC constitution) to give a verdict which would allow Anderson to play the entire Test series.Anderson was accused of pushing and abusing Jadeja during the second day of the first Test at Trent Bridge on July 10. England had also pressed for a Level 2 charge against Jadeja as a counter move.Match referee David Boon, however, downgraded it to a level 1 offence and docked Jadeja 50 percent of his match fee. Although it is an non-appealable offence, the Indians appealed against the verdict and the ICC accepted the plea.last_img read more

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